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Today — October 20, 2017

Miscellanies of Mr. Jonathan (permalink)

Jonathan Caws-Elwitt

unearths some literary gems.

An Innes bit:

“***

"If I may say so,"” said Appleby, "“your district seems to be a hotbed of sexual immorality. The people are as promiscuous as old Amos Sturrock'’s goats."”

“"Amos Sturrock'’s goats are not promiscuous.”" Mutlow was suddenly indignant.

***

[A rhetorical question answered in Wodehouse]:

***

"How many times have I told you not to come in here without knocking?" he asked sternly.

The office-boy reflected.

"Seven," he replied.

***

[And more Wodehouse]:

***

"You don't need a hat to tax a man with stealing a pig," said the Hon. Galahad, who was well versed in the manners and rules of good society.

***

. . . read more from Miscellanies of Mr. Jonathan . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Fliegende Blätter, 1937.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


How to Believe in Your Elf (permalink)
Google incorrectly scanned these Greek letters as "elf," but -- and this may surprise you! -- the sentence reads correctly that way, too.  If you take an elf away, you deprive a word of its significant part.  From Lexilogus by Philipp Carl Buttmann, 1836.   Important: see How to Believe in Your Elf.
* There is a vast world of reality into which science can no more enter than an elf can be Santa Claus.  We regret to observe that rather than face it, and confess its inability to measure it, science turns its back upon it.  Life is not always every-day life, and the insolvable mysteries are correlated not to formal rules but to spirit and inspiration.  Are bits of wisdom liable to dwarf the subject?  Indeed — and rightly!  James Howell described the ingredients of a good proverb to be "sense, shortness, and salt."  May Howell's cry resound through this present collection of maxims on believing in one's elf.

. . . read more from How to Believe in Your Elf . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
You may have thought you need electricity, but in actuality electricity needs you.  This we learn in Popular Mechanics, 1923.
. . . read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Jugend, 1902.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Die Muskete, 1933.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The mirror was shattered into a hundred pieces."  From The Magic Mirror by William Gilbert and illustrated by John Menzies, 1907.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Shutting Agnes into the chest."  From The Old Fashioned Fairy Book by Mrs. Burton Harrison and illustrated by Rosina Emmet, 1887.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .



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