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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
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Today — August 27, 2015

Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"On through the night and the storm!'  From St. Nicholas magazine, 1900.


*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Here is explained why we should behave as unreally as possible:
"We must accept the so-called reality around us, the woodlouse in the cellar no less than the evening star.  It's only we ourselves who are unreal—partly just because we are aware of the fact.  And as a result we contradict ourselves.  Would you try to build a house of sand?  You wouldn't move a finger to do so.  Because you know that the house would collapse at once.  And all that we do here is equally pointless.  It drifts away like writing in the sky.  We come from the unknown, linger a lifetime, and drift away again.  Better not to act as if we were real.  We should behave as unreally as it is possible to behave in reality. ... [I]t is we on earth who are really on the Other Side.  Because we are still on the wrong side of reality, even though it surrounds us.  That means that fundamentally we are capable of everything except being real." —Ernst Kreuder, The Attic Pretenders
. . . read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
As if in anticipation of the birth of the interrobang (‽), the exclamation point/question mark combo was laid to rest in 1836, as we learn in Prose and Verse by William James Linton.


. . . read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

"At least, sir, spare yourself for the present."  From By Proxy by James Payne and illustrated by A. Hopkins, 1878.



[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

"This hat" speaks for itself.  From London and Paris through Indian Spectacles, 1897.



[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

From The Chronicles of a Garden by Henrietta Wilson, 1864.



[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

From St. Nicholas magazine, 1903.



[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Is Today The Day? (permalink)
27
August 2015

“Today is the day for you to learn the fundamentals of how to conduct yourself.”

—Eugenia Price, New Moon Rising, 1991

From the outrageous to the inspirational to the hilarious, here’s a daily reminder to break out of the old grind and do something unexpected, for the fun, the challenge, or the heck of it.

If today simply isn’t your day, click here to have a different day.


Music Box Moment (permalink)
Do you deserve a nostalgic breather?  Through the delicate workings of the music box, even the most dramatic compositions seem to play only for you.  You’ll hear even a very familiar piece in a whole new way.  Courtesy of home recording pioneer Ken Clinger, here’s today’s music box selection.  It will sound surprisingly good even through built-in computer speakers, and it will cut through the ambient noise of the office without being distracting.

Featured in Today’s Music Box:
Piano Sonata #1: movement #4 (Beethoven)
performed by Ken Clinger
If you could use another Music Box Moment, choose a piece:


There’s a Signpost Up Ahead (permalink)
One's life path is marked by crossroads and signposts.  If you are confronted with making a choice today, perhaps the signpost displayed here will help to characterize your situation and guide you to make a decision.  If you need more guidance, refresh this page for another symbol.  If both signs are the same, perhaps any choice will lead to the same outcome.

The signs are inspired by a system of symbols entitled "Spiritual Diagnosis," developed by Dr. Robert McNary of Montana.  Dr. McNary actually creates nine-faceted mandala charts for people and interprets the symbols with uncanny accuracy.  Dr. McNary's web site is RockyMountainAstrologer.com.
> view a larger version of your signpost . . .
Yesterday — August 26, 2015

Precursors (permalink)


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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the Dial-A-Joke telephone service phenomenon.  From Athens Female College's Oracle yearbook, 1912.  (For some unbelievably weird yearbook imagery, see our How to Hoodoo Hack a Yearbook.)


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Copyright © 2015 Craig Conley