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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
From Our Abecedarian Blog . . .

Today — March 2, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Ballads of Bravery by George Melville Baker, 1877.  [For Gordon Meyer.]


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
"We're just ordinary people who don't have any supernatural powers ... and don't want any."  A still from William Castle's 13 Ghosts.


. . . read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)

Here's an illustration by Georges Roux, from Maître du Monde by Jules Verne, 1902.



   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
. . . read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Come in; I'm expecting ye," from God's Winepress by Arthur Jenkinson, 1896.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Dancing Dervishes": an illustration from Across the Channel by James Crowther (1888).


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Is Today The Day? (permalink)
2
March 2015

“Today is the day for me.”

—Aubrey Malphurs, A Contemporary Handbook for Weddings & Funerals and Other Occasions, 2003

From the outrageous to the inspirational to the hilarious, here’s a daily reminder to break out of the old grind and do something unexpected, for the fun, the challenge, or the heck of it.

If today simply isn’t your day, click here to have a different day.


Music Box Moment (permalink)
Do you deserve a nostalgic breather?  Through the delicate workings of the music box, even the most dramatic compositions seem to play only for you.  You’ll hear even a very familiar piece in a whole new way.  Courtesy of home recording pioneer Ken Clinger, here’s today’s music box selection.  It will sound surprisingly good even through built-in computer speakers, and it will cut through the ambient noise of the office without being distracting.

Featured in Today’s Music Box:
Cantate Domino Canticum (Schutz)
performed by Ken Clinger
If you could use another Music Box Moment, choose a piece:


There’s a Signpost Up Ahead (permalink)
One's life path is marked by crossroads and signposts.  If you are confronted with making a choice today, perhaps the signpost displayed here will help to characterize your situation and guide you to make a decision.  If you need more guidance, refresh this page for another symbol.  If both signs are the same, perhaps any choice will lead to the same outcome.

The signs are inspired by a system of symbols entitled "Spiritual Diagnosis," developed by Dr. Robert McNary of Montana.  Dr. McNary actually creates nine-faceted mandala charts for people and interprets the symbols with uncanny accuracy.  Dr. McNary's web site is RockyMountainAstrologer.com.
> view a larger version of your signpost . . .
Yesterday — March 1, 2015

The Right Word (permalink)

The Dictionary of American Slang trances "disco" back to the 1960s, but here's the "entrance to the music hall, disco" from 1887's The Sea: Its Stirring Story of Adventure, Peril & Heroism by Frederick Whymper.



. . . read more from The Right Word . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

Here's the patron saint of slippery slopes, from Lead, Kindly Light by John Henry Newman and illustrated by Frank Dadd, 1887.



Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
. . . read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


It's Really Happening (permalink)
"It's actually happening as opposed to not actually happening, which is not nearly as useless as it sounds."


The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.  The background is courtesy of Jes.
. . . read more from It's Really Happening . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"Dash it, don't you mean a hurdy-gurdy?"  From The Works of William Makepeace Thackeray, 1869


. . . read more from The Right Word . . .



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