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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
From Our Abecedarian Blog . . .

Today — September 1, 2015

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to a lyric in "Esperantolando" by Ken Clinger and Herr Purpur (from the album KCollab.01): "Speaking with a carrot, the carrot answers 'no.'"  Our illustration appears in Vegetable Verselets for Humorous Vegetarians by Margaret Hays, 1911.  (See our previous precursor to this lyric here.)  


. . . read more from Precursors . . .


Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)

We're pleased that one retail store is offering our wide-awake dreaming card deck (deeply rooted in Mystery traditions so as to instantly illuminate any question) for fully 60% off, taking the price down from $100 to $40.  The deck won't be signed or numbered, but it will be boxed and will include a printed booklet revealing secrets about each card.  Here's the link:

https://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/self-intuiting-polarity-cards

One of our favorite reactions so far:

"I'm nearing the point of obsession.  I can't look away, and don't want to -- like Tarot cards, but with built-in illumination, and much more fun.  Brilliant, says I!"  —Jeff Hawkins



* Historians must reconstruct the past out of hazy memory.  "Once upon a time" requires "second sight."  The "third eye" of intuition can break the "fourth wall" of conventional perspectives.  Instead of "pleading the fifth," historians can take advantage of the "sixth sense" and be in "seventh heaven."  All with the power of hindpsych, the "eighth wonder of the world."  It has been said that those who forget the past are condemned to repeat it.  Therein lies the importance of Tarot readings for antiquity.  When we confirm what has already occurred, we break the shackles of the past, freeing ourselves to chart new courses into the future.
. . . read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)

"It bears repeating that chess is 1400 years old and that our ancestors were some pretty clever people."
aren9745

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How to Believe in Your Elf (permalink)


* There is a vast world of reality into which science can no more enter than an elf can be Santa Claus.  We regret to observe that rather than face it, and confess its inability to measure it, science turns its back upon it.  Life is not always every-day life, and the insolvable mysteries are correlated not to formal rules but to spirit and inspiration.  Are bits of wisdom liable to dwarf the subject?  Indeed — and rightly!  James Howell described the ingredients of a good proverb to be "sense, shortness, and salt."  May Howell's cry resound through this present collection of maxims on believing in one's elf.

. . . read more from How to Believe in Your Elf . . .


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)


*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
. . . read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)

It occurs to us that the jester and his marotte came into existence circa the 14th century, but the Tibetan and his phurba trace back to the 8th century, so the marotte is (to our own satisfaction, at least) a great-grandchild of the phurba; the phurba's mundane origin as a tent peg and its mystical purpose "to transfix" both make it an obvious tool to be handed down through the ages to the medieval clowns.

Meanwhile, here's a jester's marotte in its natural state ("shabby chic"?), before its leaves and twigs are removed and it is sanded, stained, and varnished (poor devil).  We find this wild marotte in Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry by William Carleton (undated, but that's right because Irish lore is timeless).



. . . read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's a creature of habit from Blasts from The Ram's Horn, 1902


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Is Today The Day? (permalink)
1
September 2015

“Today is the day to wallpaper a room or wall in your house to create the look that you want.”

—Jim Davis, 1,000 Marbles, 2001

From the outrageous to the inspirational to the hilarious, here’s a daily reminder to break out of the old grind and do something unexpected, for the fun, the challenge, or the heck of it.

If today simply isn’t your day, click here to have a different day.


Music Box Moment (permalink)
Do you deserve a nostalgic breather?  Through the delicate workings of the music box, even the most dramatic compositions seem to play only for you.  You’ll hear even a very familiar piece in a whole new way.  Courtesy of home recording pioneer Ken Clinger, here’s today’s music box selection.  It will sound surprisingly good even through built-in computer speakers, and it will cut through the ambient noise of the office without being distracting.

Featured in Today’s Music Box:
Etude #1 (Carcassi)
performed by Ken Clinger
If you could use another Music Box Moment, choose a piece:


There’s a Signpost Up Ahead (permalink)
One's life path is marked by crossroads and signposts.  If you are confronted with making a choice today, perhaps the signpost displayed here will help to characterize your situation and guide you to make a decision.  If you need more guidance, refresh this page for another symbol.  If both signs are the same, perhaps any choice will lead to the same outcome.

The signs are inspired by a system of symbols entitled "Spiritual Diagnosis," developed by Dr. Robert McNary of Montana.  Dr. McNary actually creates nine-faceted mandala charts for people and interprets the symbols with uncanny accuracy.  Dr. McNary's web site is RockyMountainAstrologer.com.
> view a larger version of your signpost . . .
Yesterday — August 31, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

From The Revelations of a Sprite, written and illustrated by Auber Melville Jackson, 1897.



[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

Capital M has four legs with extraordinarily well-developed calves, from The Oxford Thackeray.



[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

A class in mesmerism?  From Stories in Rhyme for Holiday Time, written by Edward Jewitt Wheeler and illustrated by Walter Satterlee, 1884.



[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .



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