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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
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Today — January 23, 2017

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Die Bühne, 1925.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Die Muskete, 1938.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Meanwhile at the Round Table, from English Illustrated, 1907.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Under the clock."  From Fun magazine, 1885.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
Can one hear the ocean in a seashell?  Yes!  The tides are at play in the inner sanctum of the shell, pulled by the gravity of the full moon.  Waves of sound rush from the spiral of the shell into the cochlear spiral of the inner ear.  Inexplicably, seagulls are often heard as well.  Skeptics may claim that the sound one hears is the rushing of one’s blood.  Yet "it has long been established that the makeup of human blood bears a haunting resemblance to that of sea water” (Larry Gedney, Alaska Science Forum).  (Previously, we found vintage proof that the ocean one hears in a seashell is the shore at Atlantic City.)



Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
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Postcard Transformations (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click to re-light the scene.

Horseshoe Falls, Niagara Falls, Canada
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Class-Book of Botany by Alphonso Wood, 1881.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Cuba Review, 1908.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This is the heading to an article about how to analyze the penmanship of "abnormal types" (the insane, criminals, forgers, those suffering from "cerebral mischief" or "nervous incompactness or attentuatedness").  One thing we learn is that in cases of delusional insanity, we find numerous capital letters where none are required, many words strongly underlined, and frequent use of ominous-looking crosses, stars or dagger-shaped signs and emblems.  In other samples of insane chirography, we find "the insanity of the penman staring at us, as it were, from every loophole and in every curve and stroke of the writing."  Yet persons of mental imbalance can trick us with their handwriting, and the article offers an example notable for its high degree of caligraphic finish and neatness, evidences of mental skill and dexterity of the penman, total absence of mental disbalance, and a "marked rememblance to the handwriting of one of the noblest and sanest men known to this or any other age, viz. Mr. Gladstone."  And so we learn that abnormal handwriting can deviate into the very picture of sanity.  Tricky!  From Cassell's, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Carl Sandburg's Potato Face Blind Man from Rootabaga Stories.  It's "A potato faced man," 1886.
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