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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
From Our Abecedarian Blog . . .

Today — August 22, 2014

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We're pleased to offer an Internet first, having painstakingly transcribed a subtitle track for the brilliant absurdist comedy film One-Way Pendulum by N. F. Simpson.  The film is not currently available on DVD, though gray market copies are available.  (The YouTube upload of the film does not feature subtitles.)  If you procure a gray market DVD, play it on your computer via VLC or Plex and put the .srt file in the same folder with the same name as the video file.

. . . read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

A Retroactive Lifetime Goal*: we've been dubbed "the patron saint of 'going with it'"!

*The phrase "Retroactive Lifetime Goal" appears courtesy of Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.



Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
. . . read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
"Sally looked out across the world," from Sebastiani's Secret by S. E. Waller, 1897.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From 1674, reproduced in Monographien zur deutschen Kulturgeschichte by Georg Steinhausen, 1899.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from When William IV Was King by John Ashton (1896).


*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
. . . read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Bogey-Owl": an illustration from The Young Pretenders by Edith Fowler (1895).


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Gulliver's Travels.  The caption reads: "Squeezing my legs together, he wedged them into the marrow-bone."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Is Today The Day? (permalink)
22
August 2014

“Today is the day for your bow-tie.”

—Patrick Boyle, Like Any Other Man, 1966

From the outrageous to the inspirational to the hilarious, here’s a daily reminder to break out of the old grind and do something unexpected, for the fun, the challenge, or the heck of it.

If today simply isn’t your day, click here to have a different day.


Music Box Moment (permalink)
Do you deserve a nostalgic breather?  Through the delicate workings of the music box, even the most dramatic compositions seem to play only for you.  You’ll hear even a very familiar piece in a whole new way.  Courtesy of home recording pioneer Ken Clinger, here’s today’s music box selection.  It will sound surprisingly good even through built-in computer speakers, and it will cut through the ambient noise of the office without being distracting.

Featured in Today’s Music Box:
Dance of the Blessed Spirits (Gluck)
performed by Ken Clinger
If you could use another Music Box Moment, choose a piece:


There’s a Signpost Up Ahead (permalink)
One's life path is marked by crossroads and signposts.  If you are confronted with making a choice today, perhaps the signpost displayed here will help to characterize your situation and guide you to make a decision.  If you need more guidance, refresh this page for another symbol.  If both signs are the same, perhaps any choice will lead to the same outcome.

The signs are inspired by a system of symbols entitled "Spiritual Diagnosis," developed by Dr. Robert McNary of Montana.  Dr. McNary actually creates nine-faceted mandala charts for people and interprets the symbols with uncanny accuracy.  Dr. McNary's web site is RockyMountainAstrologer.com.
> view a larger version of your signpost . . .
Yesterday — August 21, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Oracle of Baal by J. Provand Webster and illustrated by Warwick Goble, 1896.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Novels of Captain Marryat (1896).


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
. . . read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the "Name that Kitchen Utensil" game, from 1895.  The caption reads: "'Butter cooler,' I observe."


. . . read more from Precursors . . .



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Copyright © 2014 Craig Conley