CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Featured Book
The Young Wizard's Hexopedia
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
How to Believe in Your Elf
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Answers, Questioned
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
Yearbook Weirdness
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

Magic Words
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
Martha Brockenbrough
Gordon Meyer
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Phantasmaphile
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
Ironic Sans
Brian Sibley's Blog
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
Yesterday — May 26, 2016

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Andiron Tales by John Kendrick Bangs and illustrated by Clare Victor Dwiggins, 1906.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Chimney-Pot Papers by Charles Brooks, 1919.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's a rare depiction of a gnome hatchling, from The Black Aunt by Clara Volkmann Fechner, 1848.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Grafters of America by Clifton Wooldridge, 1906.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
"You don't have to be a psychic to sell oriental rugs.  You only have to be a psychic to buy them."  From Raymond Chandler's "Killer in the Rain," 1964.

> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Reineke Fuchs by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1857.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)

   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Le Diable Amoureux, Roman Fantastique by Jacques Cazotte, 1845.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

May 25, 2016

Rhetorical Answers, Questioned (permalink)

Q: Do you ever wish you could read Harry Potter again for the very first time?

A: Yes, and here's how to do it.  There's both a physical and a mental (self-hypnosis-type) component to the technique.  We'll explain how the physical component facilitates the mental.  Acquire from another nation a copy of whichever Harry Potter novel you wish to read again; for example, if you first read an American edition and wish to stick with English, seek a copy of the book that was printed in the U.K., Australia, Canada, or so on.  This new copy will look and feel different from the one you first read, and that's crucial for truthfully telling your subconscious mind that you have never read this particular book.  Indeed, to read Harry Potter again for the first time will require a sly bit of auto-hypnosis, and it's far easier to begin by not lying to yourself but rather affirming that you truly never before have opened the book you are now holding.  Sitting comfortably with eyes half-closed, gaze upon the closed book in your lap and concentrate upon the "fact" that you have heard of Harry Potter but have never read any of the books.  Your willpower, focused for half an hour at a time, will lead your mind to believe that you are new to the Harry Potter saga.  Interestingly, there's a strong argument that authors like J. K. Rowling write their books in a state of self-hypnosis, due to the combination of intense concentration and the need to conquer the authorial ego so as to get in touch with the personalities of the story's characters.  "Every author knows the difficulty--in some cases impossibility--of dropping a story until it is finished.  He is under control of the idea, and can remove the obsession only by finishing the story.  Then he awakens, or partly awakes, for a time--until the next idea comes along" (Morgan Robertson, "The Self-Hypnosis of Authors," The Critic, 1906).  And so, like J. K. Rowling as she originally wrote her stories, you must concentrate and conquer the ego that believes it knows how it all turns out.  When Rowling was first inspired to write the original Harry Potter story, she had an outline in mind for how the events would unfold, yet when it came time to pen the very first word, to communicate the story properly she had to think like her future readers, unknowledgeable of how it would all turn out.  She had to approach the story in her head with what the Zen Buddhists call a beginner's mind.  If she could do this as the author of her own novels, you can do this as the reader.  You were once brand new to Harry Potter, and that mental state yet exists in your memory.  Make a concerted effort to reclaim that state of mind.  Tell yourself again, again, and again that you are a newcomer, until you're ready to open that new book.


> read more from Rhetorical Answers, Questioned . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Right Word (permalink)
"Dancey's [to this very day] a fairy word for gay."  Date uncertain.  Scan courtesy of Aimée Wheaton.

> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Postcard Transformations (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click to bring on the night.

Collins Ave. looking south from 17th St., Miami Beach, Florida
> read more from Postcard Transformations . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's the Queen of the 25 of Spades, c. 1905, scanned by the National Library of Ireland.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest



Page 2 of 1272



Original Content Copyright © 2016 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.