CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.

Select Creations
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

SPOGG
Magic Words
Monkeys 1, Typewriters 0
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Tonya Harding Shot JFK.com
Lord Whimsy
Phantasmaphile
Crystalpunk
BibliOdyssey
April Winchell
DJ Misc
Grow-a-brain
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
J-Walk Blog
Ironic Sans
Ursi's Blog
Brian Sibley's Blog
Omegaword
World of Wonder
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
May 31, 2007

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the ages . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 4
• 8-letter words: 1

One 7-letter word refers to pastoral creatures.

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .

May 30, 2007

The Right Word (permalink)
Nameless characters, anathema to critics, lend some fun irony when they get tagged from the get-go:

"When a nameless man (Siffredi) prevents a nameless woman (Casar) from committing suicide, she pays him to visit her at her deserted house and watch her 'where she's unwatchable.'" [source]

"Romantic rumblings start when a nameless man (Aaron Eckhart) meets a nameless woman (Bonham Carter) at his sister's wedding." [source]

"After his wife dies, the rough-cut and intentionally nameless 'man' (Jozsef Madaras) eventually coerces the 'woman' (Julianna Nyako) into doing his housework for a small remuneration." [source]

"We follow a nameless man (Nayef Fahoum Daher), content with his coffee and cigarettes, who tries to keep order in a rancorous neighborhood." [source]

"A nameless man (Alejandro Ferretis) travels from the city deep into the Mexican countryside, looking for a place to die." [source]

"One evening she meets a nameless man (Sam Neill) who, after coming back to her place, takes her hostage on his yacht." [source]

"A nameless woman (Kim Novak) plays a Madeleine Elster possessed by her ancestor." [source]

"This time, the action – well, inaction: our hero is at his most animated when rolling cigarettes – centres on a nameless man (Markku Peltola) who, having been beaten senseless, wakes up and finds himself among the homeless in Helsinki harbour." [source]

"Fight Club starts out, interestingly enough, about a nameless man (the Narrator, played by Edward Norton) who is a relatively successful employee of 'a major automobile manufacturer.'" [source]

"The film's opening credits flash with a frantic, dramatic score, and we are introduced to a nameless woman (Vanessa Redgrave) unable to sleep in a dingy third-world hotel." [source]

"This nameless man is played by Jean-Pierre Léaud." [source]

"Hope (Nadja Brand) and her young daughter are abducted and brought to a remote, terrifying forest by a mysterious and nameless man (Eric Colvin)." [source]

"So Laure lets a nameless man (Vincent Lindon) into her car to give him a lift." [source]

When an actor's name is unavailable, it's tempting to fill in the blank with a famous name ...

"At the door is a guy who shall remain nameless, so I will call him KEITH RICHARDS for the sake of naming him something other than 'nameless man.'" [source]

... or a deliberately mundane one:

"The Narrator is a nameless man in the story (so let’s call him Jack)" [source]

Even when a nameless character is named "Nameless," naming him is still irresistible:

"The movie begins with a nameless man (named Nameless — played by Jet Li) being delivered to a meeting with the king who is going to reward our hero for successfully killing the three people in his land who have been trying to assassinate the king for the length of his reign." [source]

Sometimes, even a scriptwriter can't resist naming a nameless character:

"Tuco and the nameless man, who is called 'Blondie' throughout the film, are two con artists in cahoots." [source]

___________

Jonathan wrote:

This brings to mind that hard-cussing French film star, Nom de Nom.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


The Right Word (permalink)

A third award for One-Letter Words: A Dictionary

Along with the award is my favorite description to date:

STEP INSIDE DESIGN MAGAZINE, Annual 2007 issue:

by Taylor Stapleton

Author Craig Conley has a literary mind and a designer's reverence for individual letters, a secular devotion made manifest in Mucca Design's work for his One Letter Words: A Dictionary. The pristine white volume has the proportions and gold foil embellishment of a child's first Bible, while its uncoated jacket paper offers the tactile richness of leather.

Where Conley has unearthed the letters' literary meanings, art director Matteo Bologna's Decora and Infidelity typefaces showcase their forms with all the sensual flourish of an illuminated manuscript. The latter typeface's name suggests sinful indulgence, and indeed the book's design is not as pure as its sacred allusions suggest. Conley opens with the notion of "an entire alphabet of scarlet letters," and Mucca's color scheme is accordingly flush with the rosy hues of flesh. Designer Cristina Ottolini claims she simply set out to create "a handsome volume that would appeal to bibliophiles, the sort of person interested in the rarefied topic of one-letter words." The result is sure to please even the most zealous lover of language.
> read more from The Right Word . . .

May 29, 2007

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)

"If a unicorn frolics in the forest with no one to hear it, then is the unicorn imaginary?"  Not necessarily!

Expert unicorn spotters can “see” more unicorns with their eyelids shut than the average person can see with eyes wide open.  That’s because they are intimate with the sounds unicorns make.  A Field Guide to Identifying Unicorns by Sound (presented in an eco-friendly, low-wattage palette) will help you to identify the various calls of the mysterious unicorn as it frolicks in its natural environment.  Along the way, you will become better acquainted with unicorns’ habits, eccentricities, antics, attitudes, and manners.  Before you know it, encountering unicorns will become second nature.  Hearing is believing!
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
Jonathan writes:

A family member gave us a package of Hungarian noodles, which [my wife] Hilary and I were studying the other night, with an eye to figuring out how we might eventually prepare them.

On the back of the package was a recipe, in Hungarian.  Though the alphabet is Roman, we found that neither of us could recognize or induce the meaning of a single word--unlike when we see something in, say, Swedish.  And yet the structure of the text was completely familiar. Here was the list of ingredients, and there was the narrative that explained what to do with them.  I realized that this visible recipe with invisible elements was, in effect, a blank map!
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

May 28, 2007

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of adversity . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"Gobbledygook" in recent news:

Chinese translation systems (New Yorker)
Self-conscious dialog (Riverfront Times)
Radical leftist ideology (Human Events)
The "foreign" language of mathematics (MarketWatch)
Conspiracy theories about the Illuminati secret society in "Tomb Raider" (Ottowa Citizen)
Baby talk (Science Now)
The Bible as seen by secularists (Post Chronicle)
Pseudo-science (Blogger News Network)
Postmodernism (Town Hall)
"The Gobbledygook Manifesto" viral marketing campaign (eMediaWire)
Lawyer mumbo jumbo (MarketWatch)
Impenetrable Congressional legislation (Small Gov Times)
Alan Greenspan rhetoric (MarketWatch)
Federal programs loaded with bureaucratic jargon (Gwinnett Daily Post)
Marxist-Leninist lingo (Journal of Turkish Weekly)
Phony mysticism (Malaysia Star)
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Playing on Vulnerabilities

—Mlisse R. Lafrance, “Colonizing the Feminine,” Sport and Postmodern Times (1998)
> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

May 27, 2007

Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

May 26, 2007

Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

May 25, 2007

Strange Dreams (permalink)

"Many Moons More," a painting in oil and epoxy resin by Erin Parish, 2005.
I dreamed about seeing multiple moons in the sky and knowing that extraterrestrial visitation was imminent.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Piquing Interest and Then Walking Away

Gods above, it was the oldest trick in the book.
—Rosalind Miles, The Maid of the White Hands (2003)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

May 24, 2007

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of abundance . . .


 


* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

May 23, 2007

Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 7
• 8-letter words: 2

One 7-letter word refers to having eaten sumptuously, and another refers to one's figure after such banqueting.

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .

May 22, 2007

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Phony Wallet

Didn’t have any money?  Man, that’s the oldest trick in the books.  Everybody carries a fake wallet for robberies — sometimes two or even three.
—Robert Sheckley, “A Ticket to Tranai,” The Mammoth Book of Science Fiction (2002)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

May 21, 2007

Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
You're (Literally) the Top
(inspired by Cole Porter, of course)

You're the top;
you're the peak of Dante;
You're the top—
blue-chip picante.
You're the jewel in the crown of a dinner gown by Klein.
You're Dorsey's trombone,
you're Kheops' capstone,
you're altar wine.
You're the top—
as in "hat," on Fred's head.
You're the quip
dear old Oscar Wilde said.
I'm an inarticulate voiceless glottal stop.
But if, baby, I'm the bottom you're the top!

You're the top;
you're the head of Acme
(placed there
by imperial decree).
You're the high point of a fairy tale by Grimm.
You're lemon zest,
you're Arthur's crest,
you're the Battle Hymn.
You're the top—
you're the Everest summit.
You ascend
where others plummet.
Compared to me John Falstaff is a fop.
But if, baby, I'm the bottom you're the top!
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

May 20, 2007

Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

May 19, 2007

Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

May 18, 2007

Puzzles and Games (permalink)
Can you guess the nature of this diagram?

Highlight this black bar to reveal answer: It's the pattern of a crop circle in Great Britain.


Diagram from this website.
> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Paying Yourself First

It’s called Paying Yourself First (also known as The Oldest Trick In The Book).
—Jean Chatsky, Talking Money (2002)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

May 17, 2007

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed I was dying.*

*"The semicolon is indeed a dying punctuation mark." —The Disposable Chronicles
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

May 16, 2007

Puzzles and Games :: Constellations (permalink)
A numberless connect-the-dots (top left), with a variety of possible answers.


Collage sources and other excellent possible answers:
joemorris.mystarband.net/images/Orion%20Constellation.jpg
www.novaspace.com/ORIG/Tucc/Orion.jpeg
pweb.jps.net/~sangreal/orion.jpg
www.etoile-des-enfants.ch/dessins/constellations/images/ph_constellation_orion_fanny.jpg
students.ou.edu/L/John.C.Luce-1/Orion.jpeg
hubblesource.stsci.edu/sources/illustrations/constellations/images/orion.png
victorian.fortunecity.com/plath/210/images/orionm.jpg
www.ianridpath.com/startales/image/Orion2.jpg
hsci.cas.ou.edu/images/jpg-100dpi-10in/19thCentury/Aspin/1825/Aspin-1825-Orion.jpg
www.fcps.edu/DIS/OHSICS/planet/constell/orion.htm
www.physics.csbsju.edu/astro/constellations/orion_l.html
www.opencourse.info/astronomy/introduction/02.motion_stars_sun/orion_taurus_figures.gif
www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Images/OrionUranometria.jpg
burro.case.edu/Academics/Astr201/Discovering/orionmyth.jpg
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Constellations . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 11
• 8-letter words: 4

One 8-letter word refers to angry scolding.

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .

May 15, 2007

Puzzles and Games :: D-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: D-ictionary . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The day I learned Eskimos don't have hundreds of words for "snow," the world seemed so much more ordinary.  Just don't tell me Pocahontas couldn't "paint with all the colors of the wind."
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

May 14, 2007

Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Passage of Time

Time continued to pass—the oldest trick in the world, and maybe  
the only one that really is magic.
Shawshank Redemption (1994)
> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

May 13, 2007

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
How can you tell dawn from dusk?  Easy—they're as different as night and day!
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

May 12, 2007

Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Santa Claus is an elf-described "miracle worker."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

May 11, 2007

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)

Q: What do you call it when California wine makers hire their own family members to stomp on the grapes? 

A: Napa-tism.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

May 10, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Q: What, precisely, is a first cousin?

A: The relative who sits closest to the conductor.

(Literary humorist Jonathan Caws-Elwitt's plays, stories, essays, letters, parodies, wordplay, witticisms and miscellaneous tomfoolery can be found at Monkeys 1, Typewriters 0.  Here you'll encounter frivolous, urbane writings about symbolic yams, pigs in bikinis, donut costumes, vacationing pikas, nonexistent movies, cross-continental peppermills, and other compelling subjects.)


Illustration by Prof. Oddfellow
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Partnering

They always work in pairs.  It’s the oldest trick in the book.
—David Sedaris, Me Talk Pretty One Day (2001)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

May 9, 2007

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Which came first: the cock fight or the egg throwing contest?


Left, a detail of an illustration of cock fighting in Great Britain.  The full image is located here.  Right, a detail of a photo of guy getting egg on his face at an egg-throwing contest.  The full image and gallery are located here.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 14
• 8-letter words: 5

One 8-letter word means a brief, evocative description.

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .

May 8, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
I laughed when I came across this line in a review of the film Anazapta (a supernatural tale set in the Middle Ages):

Fearing the pox, the Devil, and the French (although not in that order) ...

That would make a fun test question: "Rank the following according to menace."  What would the correct answer be?  (Hint: The worst one of them leaves a burning sensation.)
 


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

May 7, 2007

The Right Word (permalink)

Andy Warhol portrait by André Koehne, courtesy Wikimedia Commons.
Andy Warhol famously predicted that in the future, everyone would be famous for fifteen minutes.  Now that the future is already here, there are those who beg to differ with Andy, and for a fascinating variety of reasons!

In his novel Rant (2007), Chuck Palahniuk suggests that "Andy Warhol was wrong.  In the future, people won't be famous for fifteen minutes.  No, in the future, everyone will sit next to someone famous for at least fifteen minutes."

Movie critic Frank Schneck posits that the word should be film, not fame: "Andy Warhol was wrong.  It's not just that everyone is going to have 15 minutes of fame.  In the not-so-distant future, every person on the planet is going to have a film made about him or her" (Hollywood Reporter, 2000).  Others seem to agree, in a roundabout way:

"Andy Warhol was wrong. Today it seems that anyone can parlay their 15 minutes of fame into 15 cable episodes, with an option for a second season."
—"It's Unreal How Easily Reality Shows Pop Up," Rocky Mountain Daily News, July 20, 2002

"Andy Warhol was wrong. Everyone's not going to be famous for 15 minutes; instead, we will all have our own talk shows."
—"Ex-Dancer, Ex-First Son Tries a New Career: Talk Show Host," Buffalo News, Aug. 16, 1991

Then there are those who argue that the 15 minutes are recurring:

"The couple who wrote and performed the theme to the 1970s TV series "Happy Days" are on a media blitz in Colorado Springs this weekend, proving that Andy Warhol was wrong. Not only will everyone in the world get 15 minutes of fame, they'll get another 15 minutes when the nostalgia factor kicks in a couple of decades later." 
—"These Days Are Happy for Couple," The Gazette, March 6, 1997

"Andy Warhol was wrong ... People don't want 15 minutes of fame in their lifetime. They want it every night."
—"Pseudo's Josh Harris," BusinessWeek, Jan. 26, 2000

"Andy Warhol was wrong. With the release of the film, Factory Girl, he and his 'superstars' are about to get another 15 minutes of fame."
—"Straight to the Point," Daily Mail, Sept. 27, 2006

"As it turns out, Andy Warhol was wrong: not everybody will be famous for 15 minutes. But with bad prospects and a good agent, those who once were can now extend the clock thanks to unprecedented TV demands for the vaguely familiar." 
—Vinay Menon, "More Dancing with Quasi-Celebs," Toronto Star, March 19, 2007

Not fame, but Hitler:

"Andy Warhol was wrong. In the future, everyone will be Hitler for 15 minutes."
—"Originality is the First Casualty of War," Austin American-Statesman, April 1, 1999

"Andy Warhol got it wrong. It's not fame everyone will have in the future; It's a chance to scream at someone else on TV."
—"Clinton Vs. Dole About Ratings, Not Discourse," Witicha Eagle, March 11, 2003

Not fame, but privacy:

"Andy Warhol was wrong. The wild-eyed artist boldly proclaimed that in the future everyone would have 15 minutes of fame.  Warhol's fortune-telling skills were nowhere as visionary as his art. Warhol should have predicted with the explosion of reality television that in the future everyone will have 15 minutes of privacy."
—"One Day, We'll Beg for Privacy," Fresno Bee, Aug. 3, 2000

Not fame, but Colorado citizenship:

"Andy Warhol was wrong. It turned out we were all from Colorado."
—Barry Fagin, "Montel Williams and Me," Independence Institute, Nov. 1, 2000

Fame, yes, but in the past, not in the future:

"Andy Warhol was wrong. Everybody already has been famous––some time last week. It just depends on who’s telling it and who’s listening."
—"The Remembering Game," Depot Town Rag, Sept. 1990

Fame, yes, but not 15 minutes exactly:

"The culture-shock doctor explained that science had discovered that Andy Warhol was wrong about fame; He had the right idea, but his figures were off."
—"The Sting of Cable Backlash," Miami Herald, Oct. 9, 1983

"'Andy Warhol was wrong,' Neal Gabler said. 'He was right when he said everyone will be famous, but wrong about the 15 minutes.'"
—Marjorie Kaufman, "Seeking the Roots of a Celebrity Society," New York Times, Dec. 11, 1994

"Andy Warhol got it wrong by 12 minutes. People have three minutes of fame; long enough to walk down a catwalk and back."
—Guardian, July 7, 2002

"Warhol was wrong ... cos he was 10 minutes off; it's really five minutes now."
—"Meat Loaf Criticises Academic 'Laziness,'" TVNZ, March 9, 2010

Fame, yes, but for more like 15 seconds:

"Andy Warhol was wrong. Everyone can be famous these days, all right, but the renown lasts more like 15 seconds, not minutes."
—"Smile! You're Part of a Video Society," Greensboro News and Record, May 20, 1990

"Andy Warhol was wrong when he said that everyone would have 15 minutes of fame; extras can look forward to having only seconds of movie glory."
—"12 Hours' Extra Work for a Brief Moment of Glory," Derby Evening Telegraph, Nov. 9, 2006

"[A cuckoo clock bird speaking:] Andy Warhol was wrong; I only get 15 seconds of fame."
—Mike Peters, "Mother Goose and Grimm," July 27, 2005

"Andy Warhol was wrong. In my case, at least, fame clocked in at only 6:42 minutes, and that was before the final cut."
—Wilborn Hampton Lead, "Confessions of a Soap Opera Extra," New York Times, Dec. 31, 1989

"Andy Warhol was wrong when he said that everyone will enjoy their fifteen minutes of fame. The time frame he referred to might one day be measured in seconds."
—Warren Adler, "The Dividing Line," Aug. 10, 2009

Fame, yes, but for more than 15 minutes:

"Andy Warhol was wrong. You can be famous for a lot longer than 15 minutes, if you're clever enough."
—"Oliver's Brand of Revitalisation," Marketing Week, April 7, 2005

"'We were sure that Andy Warhol was wrong, that it would last more than 15 minutes,' says Hilary Jay.'"
—"Maximal Art and Its Rise from the Ashes," Philadelphia Inquirer, July 25, 1993

"When it comes to the Super Bowl, Andy Warhol was wrong. Its cast of characters has been famous for 25 years, and will be 25 years from now."
—"Simply the Best," Denver Post, Jan. 27, 1991

"Andy Warhol was wrong. Long after the buzzer sounded on Mark Fuhrman's 15 minutes of fame, he just won't go away."
—"Fuhrman Overstaying His Welcome," June 10, 2001

"Andy Warhol was wrong: sometimes you do get more than 15 minutes of fame, even if you're not Greg Louganis."
National Review, Dec. 10, 2004

"Andy Warhol was wrong. Not everyone gets 15 minutes of fame. Many people get more than that. Like Dr. Bernie Dahl."
The Nashua Telegraph, Dec. 3, 2000

"Andy Warhol was wrong. In the Ultimate universe we’ve got more than 15 minutes."
—"Hack Meets Hacker," Aspen Magazine, Midsummer 1996

"Andy Warhol was wrong … you can have 45 minutes of fame, not just 15!"
—"Invitation to Present at the OTM SIG Conference in June 2009," Dec. 22, 2008

"Andy Warhol was wrong in my case; my fifteen minutes of fame have been more like three hours."
—Ken Eichele, My Best Day in Golf: Celebrity Stories of the Game They Love, 2003

"Andy Warhol was wrong; I was a hero for at least fifteen hours." 
—Gene GeRue, "Tomato Madness," Dec. 17, 2006

"Andy Warhol was wrong.  People aren't famous for fifteen minutes; they're famous forever."
—Arthur Black, Black & White and Read All Over, 2004

Fame, yes, but "in" 15 minutes, not "for" 15 minutes:

"Andy Warhol was wrong, when he predicted that in the future, people would become famous for 15 minutes. This is the future. Now people become famous in 15 minutes. Take Duran Duran."
—Ethlie Ann Vare, "New Echoes of Duran Duran," New York Times, Nov. 24, 1985

Fame, yes, but without measure:

"Andy Warhol was wrong. In the future, everyone will not be famous for 15 minutes. Everyone will just be famous."
—"Cooking Up Celebrity Storm," Boston Globe, Jan. 21, 2000

"Andy Warhol was wrong. No one Is famous for just 15 minutes. These days you get to be famous whenever you feel like it.  Just like everyone else."
—"Now, Everyone is Famous! Who Knew?" Associated Press, July 16, 1999

"'Andy Warhol was wrong,' says Newman, who completed his trek in 1987. 'If I wanted to be boring, I could live on this for the rest of my life."
—"Book Lists Sometime-Dubious Firsts," Dallas Morning News, July 31, 1988

"Andy Warhol was wrong about one thing: His own 'fifteen minutes of fame' have never ended."
—Barnes & Noble, review of Andy Warhol Treasures, 2009

"In the internet age, bad headlines no longer go away and Andy Warhol was wrong about his fifteen minutes of fame. If you are infamous now, you are infamous forever."
—Peter Walsh, "Curtis Warren: the Celebrity Drug Baron," Telegraph, Oct. 7, 2009

The opposite of fame:

"Milwaukee futurist David Zach says Andy Warhol was wrong: We aren't going to get that 15 minutes of fame after all. 'It's just the opposite,' Zach says."
—Tim Nelson, "The Skinny," St. Paul Pioneer Press, Aug. 27, 1998

"I think Andy Warhol got it wrong: in the future, so many people are going to become famous that one day everybody will end up being anonymous for 15 minutes."
—Shepard Fairey, Swindle #8, 2006

"Andy Warhol was wrong. Most of us will never come close to being famous—even for 15 minutes."
—"Stepping into the Spotlight," Wall Street Journal, Nov. 8, 1999

Fifteen, yes, but not minutes:

"Andy Warhol was wrong: not everyone deserves 15 minutes of fame. Some people deserve 160 words of recognition ..."
—"Unsung Heroes," What Magazine, Jan. 1, 2004

"Andy Warhol was wrong: for 15 minutes, everybody gets to be a starting quarterback for The Saints."
—"Tyson Still Has Issues," Atlanta Journal, Oct. 16, 1998

"Andy Warhol was wrong: in the future, everyone won't be famous for 15 minutes, but everyone will have their own Web site."
—"Book Review: The Non-Designer's Web Book," Information Management Journal, July 1, 1999

"Andy Warhol was wrong. We've all had our 15 minutes, now we all want a mini-series!"
—"Boy First Believed On Runaway Balloon Found After Frantic Search," New York Post, Oct. 16, 2009

"Andy Warhol was wrong. Everyone won't just have 15 minutes of fame. One day—soon, I suspect—we all will have our very own talk shows."
—Linda L.S. Schulte, "Word's Worth," Baltimore Sun, Jan. 31, 1996

Fame, yes, but perhaps 30 minutes:

"There are times in life when you just hope that Andy Warhol was wrong and that a merciful God will grant you a second 15 minutes of fame."
—"Confessions of an Embarrassed Viagra Expert," University Wire, Sept. 24, 1998

Just plain wrong:

"The endless parade of disposable rock bands, special-effects movies, potboiler thriller novels and TV sitcoms makes me think that Andy Warhol was wrong."
—"Longtime Newsweek Art Critic Peter Plagens is Also a Painter," Newsweek, April 25, 2002

"A TV producer played by Joe Mantegna muses that Andy Warhol was wrong about everybody being famous for 15 minutes."
—"Allen's 'Celebrity' Witty, Wicked But Shallow," Wichita Eagle, Dec. 9, 1998

"Andy Warhol was wrong - everyone does NOT have their 15 minutes of fame and the overwhelming majority of You're a Star hopefuls would have told him that."
—"The Fame Game's Just Not Worth It," The Mirror, Aug. 25, 2006

"Andy Warhol was wrong. When you’re a Vanderbilt running back, you’re not famous for 15 minutes."
—Anthony Lane, Nashville City Paper, Nov. 5, 2004

"My main conclusion: Andy Warhol was wrong—we won't all get 15 minutes of fame."
—"Using the Internet to Examine Patterns of Foreign Coverage," Nieman Reports, Sept. 22, 2004

"Warhol was wrong! He neglected to factor in the 15 minutes of one's own alter-egos."
—"Warhol was Wrong," GenderFun.com, May 29, 2009

"Warhol was wrong. The message is clear: we do not want your 15 minutes of fame, you can shove it."
—Alix Sharkey, "Saturday Night: The Techno Ice-Cream Van is on its Way," The Independent, June 26, 1993
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
One Against the Other, Each Against Himself

For thus have I set them one against the other and each against himself.  It’s the oldest trick in the book.
—Norman Spinrad, “Riding the Torch,” The Mammoth Book of Fantastic Science Fiction (1992)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

May 6, 2007

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)

This "love bench" fit for a semicolon was found here.
I dreamed I was a bench-warmer.*

*"Semicolons are the bench-warmers of punctuation marks.  You only play them when you need to." —The Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar

---

The Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar (SPOGG) wrote:

SPOGG loves you and One Letter Words. Truly, madly, deeply, and with all imaginable punctuation marks.
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

May 5, 2007

The Right Word (permalink)
"Incredible and yet inevitable."  When I looked up these lyrics from a song, Google returned zero results.  In addition to feeling disappointed that the song lyrics weren't available online, I'm also feeling somewhat sad that nothing out there is considered "incredible and yet inevitable."  (Once Google spiders this webpage, it will finally return one result for "incredible and yet inevitable."  But that won't count.)
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

May 4, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
How to tell the difference between actors John Hurt and John Heard:

John Hurt was hurting when:
  • an alien burst through his chest in Alien
  • he was taken to the dreaded "Room 101" in 1984
  • Sir Thomas More wouldn't give him a job in A Man for All Seasons
  • when his elephantitis was exploited in The Elephant Man
John Heard was a good listener when:
  • his lover turned into a roaring leopard in Cat People
  • a guy in his bar was just trying to get back home in After Hours
  • he learned about the interdependence of all systems in Mindwalk
  • when his family adopted a wayward girl in Rambling Rose
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

May 3, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The first diagram is my recreation of "The Pickle Theory of Value."  (This is a serious theory about the perceived value of start up businesses, and it is explained here.  Between you and me, I think all graphs should feature vegetables instead of boring lines.)

The second diagram is my spin-off of the pickle theory.  I call it, "Ceci n'est pas une cornichon."
 



> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
"Is that it?"  No.  You ain't seen nothing yet.
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .

May 2, 2007

Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Offering Riches, Power, and Fame

He used the oldest trick in the book: offering riches, power, and fame for my soul.
—Andrew G. Hodges, Jesus: An Interview Across Time (2003)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

May 1, 2007

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 15
• 8-letter words: 3
• 9-letter words: 1

The 9-letter word refers to an unbelievably small unit of measure.

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .



Page of 708



Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.