CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Select Creations
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

SPOGG
Magic Words
Monkeys 1, Typewriters 0
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Tonya Harding Shot JFK.com
Lord Whimsy
Phantasmaphile
Crystalpunk
BibliOdyssey
April Winchell
DJ Misc
Grow-a-brain
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
J-Walk Blog
Ironic Sans
Ursi's Blog
Brian Sibley's Blog
Omegaword
World of Wonder
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
September 30, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
If Rainbows Were Architecture

What happens when an eccentric architect has the soul of a painter? He drafts a technicolor blueprint and creates elaborate canvasses out of brick and mortar. Portmeirion, the celebrated Italianate village on the west coast of Wales, and famous location of the 60’s cult television series "The Prisoner,” was built by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis as a retirement project.

The fairy-tale hamlet he created (30 years before Disneyland) is like a three-dimensional picture postcard exhibiting an unparalleled array of colors. Portmeirion is often cited as an example of "picturesque architecture.” Picturesque simply means that something is proper to be pictured. In the picture that is Portmeirion, foreground and background are the real ground of a rainbow we can walk through.

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at Colourlovers.com.]


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Finally, someone has taken all the awkwardness out of spontaneous picnics!


 A festive meal wherever you are!  This prototype was conceived by Reddish Studio.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 10
• 8-letter words: 4

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused. One of the 7-letter words is rather invigorating.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .

September 29, 2007

Peace Symbols to Color (permalink)


> read more from Peace Symbols to Color . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 28, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The origin of pointillism?


Tim Knowles, Tree Drawing, Greek Pine on easel #1, Hydra, Greece, 2005.  Full-size image available at rokebygallery.com.  Via ffffound.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Partygoer: What do you do?

Magician: I'm a struggling escape artist.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

September 27, 2007

Peace Symbols to Color (permalink)


> read more from Peace Symbols to Color . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of guidance . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Switch the Blame

—Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged (1957)
> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

September 26, 2007

Staring at the Sun (permalink)
From the nonist: This image is "a color composite I created combining 6 hand drawn black and white images, each by a different astronomer, of a total solar eclipse which occurred on July 18th 1860. Although photography already existed at the time of this eclipse it was nowhere near precise enough to make truly useful astronomical observations. The astronomers who recorded it continued on with the method of hand drawing observations, which they’d employed long before the invention of the telescope, let alone the upstart photography. This particular eclipse was special in that the drawings are now thought to be the first known representations of a coronal mass ejection."  See the fascinating full story and collected images here.


> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 25, 2007

The Right Word (permalink)
Lively Emptings: "The yeast sediment in the bottom of a beer barrel.  Used in place of eggs in some recipes."

(From Chef2Chef.net, via Jonathan.)
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Suitcase with No Bottom

The suitcase with no bottom was the oldest trick in the world.
—Paul Franson, “Valley Residents Relate Vacation Tales of Fear and Loathing,” Napa News (2001)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

September 24, 2007

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed I met the mischievous fairy Puck.  He hadn't read A Midsummer Night's Dream but was delighted to know that Shakespeare had written about him.  I learned that his real name, in Welsh, is Pwca.  I mispronounced it "pica," which was perfectly understandable given my typesetting background.  He pronounced his name "Pooka."  His physical resemblance to me was uncanny.  It was like looking in a mirror.

[Illustration based upon a coal drawing of Pwca by a Welsh peasant in the 1880s.]


> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the great paradox . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

September 23, 2007

Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 22, 2007

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)

Photo from the Concrete Wolf Poetry Chapbook Series.  Full size version here
From a web ad for a wildlife fund:

"How many wolves have to die?" 

I hate to bear (no pun intended) bad news, but the mortal answer is:

"All of them."
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 30
• 8-letter words: 7
• 9-letter words: 2
• 10-letter words: 1

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused. The 10-letter word is a compound word meaning very silent.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .

September 21, 2007

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
My friend Ken coined a word while discussing the frantic pace of his office: hectnicity.  Here's the pun it inspired:

hectnicity: the heritage of one's rat race
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

September 20, 2007

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the grandfather clock . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 19, 2007

The Right Word (permalink)
A gossip report quoted a source who "sounds like a teenage girl when she breathlessly relates (with all kinds of implied exclamation points and italic) that" so-and-so is inseparable from so-and-so.  As if the idea of an "implied exclamation point" weren't delicious enough, there's mention of "all kinds" of implied exclamation points!  My inner eye is feasting over an entire chart of implied explanation points, each variety clearly distinguished!  As there was also mention of implied italic, perhaps each kind of implied exclamation point has an oblique variant.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Sudden Soft Tones

The snare will hit hard, and the whole band will suddenly drop back to piano; it’s very dramatic—and the oldest trick in the book.
—Ed Friedland, Bass Grooves (2004)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

September 18, 2007

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Estate planning puns:

• Henry Ford had four wills.

• Vincent van Gogh had one heir.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Puzzles and Games :: D-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: D-ictionary . . .

September 17, 2007

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the Grail . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 16, 2007

Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 23
• 8-letter words: 1
• 9-letter words: 2

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused. The 8-letter word refers to ornamental shoulder pieces.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .

September 15, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

I finally tried to watch the film Perfume.  Perhaps I'd have liked it better had I worn one of these.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Star-Six-Seven (Telephone Number Blocking)

PL always star-six-sevens before he dials.  Oldest trick in the book.  
—Laurie Faria Stolarz, Blue is for Nightmares (2003)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

September 14, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
A cartoon on the value of fairy tales, from the Jan. 8, 1919 issue of Punch.  The caption reads:

Poor Old Woman (to youth, who has given her a gratuity and relieved her of her load of wood):
"I PRESUME, MY KIND YOUNG FRIEND, THAT YOU ARE THE YOUNGEST OF THE THREE BROTHERS WHO ARE GOING OUT TO SEEK THEIR FORTUNES?"

Clever Youth: "NO, I'M THE ELDEST. BUT I'VE BEEN READING THE STORIES."


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 13, 2007

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Ever wondered what happens to the coins you throw into a wishing well?

Revealed for the first time: Frogs take the money and spend it unwisely. 


This evidence was collaged from photos found on Xenopus.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the Gnostics . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

September 12, 2007

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)

A possible book title: Piano Tuning: A Two-Pronged Approach
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Standing on a Toilet

“How’d the guy get in?”
    “He stood on a commode in the men’s room and no one saw him at closing.”
    Ruth waved her hand in disgust.  “That’s one of the oldest tricks on the books.”
—Jo Dereske, Miss Zukas and the Library Murders (1994)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

September 11, 2007

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)

Photo by David Friedman.  Thanks, David!
From Jonathan Caws-Elwitt:

"Did you hear that Puffs' claim to be softer than Kleenex turned out to be a tissue of lies?"

(Literary humorist Jonathan Caws-Elwitt's plays, stories, essays, letters, parodies, wordplay, witticisms and miscellaneous tomfoolery can be found at Monkeys 1, Typewriters 0.)

And from the Abecedarian archives:

This is what David, a photographer and visionary thinker, saw when he reached for the last tissue in the box. He calls it "Georgia O’Kleenex."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 10, 2007

Unicorns (permalink)
Raphael's "Lady With Unicorn."

A unicorn stepping stone.

A fancy Irish dress that celebrates unicorns.

Destroying the great desert unicorn art installation.

According to my research in A Field Guide to Identifying Unicorns by Sound, the captivating, lightsome voice of a unicorn may sound like:
  • a wondrous cascading
  • an exotic lullaby
  • something out of a fairy tale
  • a strange, melodic chuckling
  • a trickling flute
  • a comfort
  • a mourning dove
  • an angelic shower
  • a happy cooing
  • Ella Fitzgerald
  • spiritually-charged vibrations
  • burbling water
  • something from the future
  • peculiarly clear

Unicorn-themed color palettes from ColourLovers.com:


"Unicorn Night Light" by Hellbuny. The full palette description is here.


"Unicorn" by Farewelltransmission. The full palette description is here.


"Unicorn Tapestry" by MattyD. The full palette description is here.


From Punch, Aug. 14, 1841
> read more from Unicorns . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

September 9, 2007

Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 6
• 8-letter words: 4

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused. One of the 7-letter words is a type of kettledrum.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .

September 8, 2007

The Right Word (permalink)
Luke Metcalfe, creator of a charming online anagram dictionary, suggests that "to some small degree we've been subconsciously shaping our language to make nice anagrams."  He is referring to the huge number of anagrams that are surprisingly fitting, such as: eternity and entirety, backward and drawback, discern and rescind, demand and madden, comedian and demoniac, American and cinerama, aspirate and parasite, oldies and soiled, lust and slut.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 7, 2007

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of freedom . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Squeal of an Infant

The oldest trick in the world
is the squeal of an infant
—Anonymous, “Sweet Relief,” Adventus Christi (1972)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

September 6, 2007

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the four winds . . .


 


The Four Winds, via.
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

September 5, 2007

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)

Every time I write a rhetorical question, I wish there were a special question mark to signify my meaning.  Here's what I came up with.

The Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar writes:

Up until now, the only problem with them has been the clumsy punctuation we use.  If we use a traditional question mark, some yahoo might answer.  If we use a period, we sound like Eeyore, the donkey who needs Prozac.  So thank you, Craig Conley, for this, the rhetorical question symbol.  Why didn't we think of that? (Wait, don't answer -- it was rhetorical.)

----

Bruce Robb shares:

According to Wikipedia:

In the 1580s, English printer Henry Denham invented a "rhetorical question
mark" for use at the end of a rhetorical question; however, it died out of
use in the 1600s. It was the reverse of an ordinary question mark, so that
instead of the main opening pointing back into the sentence, it opened away
from it.[*]

* Truss, Lynne. Eats, Shoots & Leaves, 2003. p. 142.
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 4, 2007

The Right Word (permalink)
My site for all strange and unusual references (great and small) has undergone a major redesign.  Spread the words!


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

September 3, 2007

The Right Word (permalink)
Here's a kiss and hug (X and O, in the shorthand of love notes), by way of the  One Letter Words Quiz Deck by Pomegranate. 


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Unicorns (permalink)

The unicorn is described in this history of animals entitled Ontleding Des Menschelyken Lichaams from 1551.

A nifty unicorn puppet.

Do cats love unicorns?

Unicorn-themed color palettes from ColourLovers.com:


"Unicorns" by Xtoq. The full palette description is here.


"Unicorn" by Fidgety. The full palette description is here.


"Real Men Heart Unicorns" by Zkarcher. The full palette description is here.
> read more from Unicorns . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
“Snake!”

“Sss . . . snake!” George screamed.  God, thought Harry, one of Preacher’s snakes has escaped.  Harry jerked his head for a look.  And George stepped in and knocked him on his ass and kicked him full in the chest. . . . Goddam, [Harry] thought, I fell for the oldest trick in the book.
—Joe R. Lansdale, “The Pit,” The Mammoth Book of Pulp Action (2001)

> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

September 2, 2007

Uncharted Territories (permalink)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

September 1, 2007

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of forgotten dreams . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 14
• 8-letter words: 2

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused. One of the 7-letter words has to do with the itch mite.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .



Page of 809



Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.