CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
January 31, 2008

Puzzles and Games (permalink)

We're delighted to announce that the game of "Rock, Paper, Scissors" has been reincarnated into a Zen version: "Moon, Fish, Ocean."  Play online against the Blind Master (a.k.a. your humble server).  Every hand combination tells a Zen poem through sign language.  Then check out the book version, which whimsically explores the complete rules, scoring, history, and variations of the game.

We're honored that our game inspired the visual poet Geof Huth to create a poem-word (or "pwoermd," to be precise):

moonfishocean

Geof's poem then inspired a Finnish translation, by Karri Kokko:

kuukalameri

Geof explains that "'kuu' is 'moon,' 'kala' is 'fish,' and 'meri' (which appears to be a cognate of the French 'mer') means 'ocean.'"
> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
The author of an immensely exciting Surrealist Dictionary explains to us that "Words have begun to make up their own meanings, simply because they desire to be free and live their own lives, outside of normal human convention and assigned stereotypes."  Here is a selection of "E" entries to give you a flavor of what to expect:

EEL: The corners of a room where the walls meet the ceiling to form an escape route.

ELEVATOR: A soft, spongy mass that consumes its weight in gold.

EROS: A species of hunting dog with bright red feathers.

ESTROGEN: Wishbone used for rearranging constellations.

ETHER: Female reproductive organ.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed about my Aunt B last night.  But I've always been closest to L (just ask any typist).


A costume designed in a workshop in experimental typography at Konstfack, University Collage of Arts, Crafts and Design in Stockholm.  See this and others at RBG6.
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .

January 30, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Greg Ross, proprietor of Futility Closet, showcased this 1903 patent for chicken spectacles.

That's funny—I thought the inventor was doing it for a lark.


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
Artist Jon Sasaki modified a subwoofer to vibrate a Ouiji pointer over a Ouiji Board, "spelling out the sinister directives that have been encoded in all popular music as subliminal messages."  See a video of the device in action!


Via Vvork.
> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the petroglyphs . . .


 


Petroglyphs illustration by James Q. Jacobs.  Large version available here.
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 29, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

O.K. Corral sign photo by RileyOne.
A-OK

Every day, more people are making more things "okay." Consider the following examples:

The television character Adrian Monk made it okay to have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

The film Bonnie and Clyde made it okay to sympathize with murderers

The Cold War and space race made it "okay to be smart" in America

The actress and glamor model Pamela Anderson made it okay for a chick to be "wild, adventurous, reckless, kittenish"

The film Deliverance made it okay to make fun of rednecks, backwoodsmen, and simpletons. However, comedian Jeff Foxworthy made it "okay to be a redneck" (source is in PDF format)

"In his humble, brilliant simplicity, Dave [Thomas, the founder of the Wendy's restaurant chain] made it okay to be, well, just okay"

Arquitectonica's Atlantis, a "tropical modernist" condominium in Miami, made it okay to "color outside of the box"

The HBO show "Six Feet Under" made it "okay to laugh at, think about and talk about death and your dysfunctional family"

The film Superman (1978) made it okay for Hollywood to adapt comic books

The character Tracy Turnblad from John Waters' Hairspray (1988) "made it okay to be fat"

Children's television icon Mister Rogers made it okay to be curious

The famous collie Lassie "made it as much as many of us have always loved dogs

Prozac "made it okay to take a psychotropic drug"

The HBO series Sex and the City "made the world safe for sluts, and Paris Hilton made it okay to hate them again"

Balloon delivery man Don F. Cheeseman made it okay for a guy to drive a pink van (and don lingerie after a night of drinking)

New York City "is so hip to walking, they've made it okay to eat en route"

J. Mascis, of the band Dinosaur Jr., is the man who made it okay to rip a guitar solo in underground rock

This is a post that I am "co-blogging" with Hanan Levin of Grow-a-Brain. Thank you, Hanan!
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
These delightful "Characters for an Epic Tale" were created by Tom Gauld for Cabanon Press.  The piece is available as a postcard within Tom's book Robots, Monsters, Etc.


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

by budak

I opened my eyes and all the sea was ice- nine. The moist green earth was a blue- white pearl. The sky darkened. Borasisi, the sun, became a sickly yellow ball, tiny and cruel. The sky was filled with worms. The worms were tornadoes.
—Kurt Vonnegut Cat’s Cradle, 1963.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

January 28, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

January 27, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Dimrill

Heavy and Weightless Colors

To paraphrase a classic riddle, which weighs more: a pound of yellow feathers or a pound of red lead? Color may be a weighty subject, but the spectrum can't be gauged in terms of tonnage. The Swiss painter Paul Klee observed that color can be "neither weighed nor measured. Neither with scales nor with ruler can any difference be detected between two surfaces, one a pure yellow and the other a pure red, of similar area and similar brilliance. And yet, an essential difference remains, which we, in words, label yellow and red" (On Modern Art, 1948). Klee was right—even though colors don't technically have weight, they can appear quite heavy and substantial or extraordinarily light and vaporous.

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of perfection . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 26, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

It was the night of the full moon. Flaring like a white- hot coin, so brilliant that it hurt one’s eyes, the moon swam rapidly upwards in a sky of smoky blue, across which drifted a few wisps of yellowish cloud. The stars were all invisible. The croton bushes, by day hideous things like jaundiced laurels, were changed by the moon into jagged black- and- white designs like fantastic woodcuts. . . .

Look at the moon, just look at it!’ Flory said. It’s like a white sun. It’s brighter than an English winter day.’

Elizabeth looked up into the branches of the frangipani tree, which the moon seemed to have changed into rods of silver. The light lay thick, as though palpable, on everything, crusting the earth and the rough bark of trees like some dazzling salt, and every leaf seemed to bear a freight of solid light, like snow. Even Elizabeth, indifferent to such things, was astonished.
—George Orwell, Burmese Days, 1934.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

January 25, 2008

Strange Dreams (permalink)
"First came the buzzing, and then the Hive mind came online." --Neal L. Asher, The Skinner


The philosopher Hegel as depicted by Emmanuel Polanco.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

January 24, 2008

Strange Dreams (permalink)
"It is as if she had shredded time into gossamer threads and rewoven them into a pattern of her own."
Orville Prescott, In My Opinion


"Chrono_Shredder" is a hybrid between calendar, clock and waste producing automaton. By Susanna Hertrich.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Q: Where's the best effing place to live in Illinois? 

A: Effingham!
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

January 23, 2008

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
"We speak often of rhetorical questions, but never about another figure of speech of equal importance: the rhetorical imperative."
Geof Huth
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Some people say / The Green River Blues ain’t bad, / Then it must not have been / Them Green River Blues I had.
—Charley Patton, "Green River Blues," 1929.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of paradise . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 22, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The original American Idol:


See full size image here.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
Q: "Who wants to play the ghost of Hamlet's father?"
A: "I."

First Person Ominous

---

Q: "Who is impartial?"
A: "I."

First Person Objective

---

Q: "Who feels invincible?"
A: "I."

First Person Omnipotent

---

Q: "Who can bi-locate?"
A: "I."

First Person Omnipresent

---

Q: "Who here can referee?"
A: "I."

First Person Adjudicative
> read more from The Right Word . . .

January 21, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by atomicshark

Multicolored, Multilingual

When we talk of colors, we can't help but be multilingual. Our pictorial world tour of exotic color names continues on through Italy, France, and Greece.

 


by Starfires.

Amethyst. The opposite of "chartreuse" (the name of a pale green liqueur), "amethyst" means "not drunken" in its original Greek. The violet/purple quartz stone was so-named because it was popularly believed to prevent inebriation.

Amethyst

 


by hartlandmartin.

Verdigris. The name of this bright blue-green color is derived from an Old French phrase meaning "green of Greece." It refers to the patina on copper, bronze and brass. In the musical "Wicked," verdigris is the color of the Wicked Witch Elphaba.

verdigris

 


by modean987.

Vermillion. The name of this bright red pigment is derived from the Latin word for "worm." Vermillion is naturally produced from Chinese cinnabar.

vermillion

 


by Jesse Gardner.

Cerulean. The name of this deep blue sky color is derived from a Latin word meaning "heavens."

Cerulean

 


by Kelly Sue.

Ecru. The name of this light gray-yellow color comes from a French word meaning "raw, unbleached." Once considered a synonym for beige, ecru is now regarded as a separate color.

ecru

 


by key-bee.

Carnelian. This orange-red-brown color is named for the reddish semiprecious mineral chalcedony. The word is derived from a Latin root meaning a flesh-colored horn. The color is famous as the official shade of Campbell's Soup cans.

Carnelian


[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

January 20, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From the margins (or margarines, rather) of philosophy:


From Tweebiscuit.net.  Via Neatorama.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the one thousand cranes . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 19, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

I gave my name, and looked about. Deal table in the middle, plain chairs all around the walls, on one end a large shining map, marked with all the colors of a rainbow. There was a vast amount of red good to see at any time, because one knows that some real work is done in there, a deuce of a lot of blue, a little green, smears of orange, and, on the East Coast, a purple patch, to show where the jolly pioneers of progress drink the jolly lager- beer. However, I wasn’t going into any of these. I was going into the yellow. Dead in the center. And the river was there fascinating deadly like a snake.
—Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness, 1899.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

January 18, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
The Corsair Ergonomic Keyboard For Pirates


From PlanetDan.  Via ffffound.com.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

January 17, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
Redundant: "exhibitionistic streak"
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
What's it called when the Grim Reaper says "Nighty Night?"

A "euthanism."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

January 16, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

At a party, the young woman in mouse- gray is as difficult to see as a mouse, while the ones in brilliant reds and pinks and oranges draw suitors just as a highly colored flower does insects and are sometimes as readily pollinated.
—Allison Lurie, The Language of Clothes, 1981.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of numbers . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 15, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
Q: "Who ate everything?"
A: "I."

First Person Omnivorous

---

Q: "Who feels defeated?"
A: "I."

First Person Subjugated

---

Q: "Who knows what's going on?"
A: "I."

First Person Omniscient

---

Q: "Who will win the lottery?"
A: "I."

First Person Prescient

---

Q: "Who cares?"
A: "Not I."

First Person Ambivalent
> read more from The Right Word . . .

January 14, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

January 13, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

A meaningless swirl in the stream of time, a temporary gathering of bits, a few random specks, a cloud . . . Complexities: green dust, purple dust, gold.
—John Gardner, Grendel, 1971.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the night . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 12, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Some great sea of liquid green with its milk- white crest of foam rose.
—Jack London, The Complete Short Stories of Jack London, 1893.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


The Right Word (permalink)


Art by Keri Smith.
> read more from The Right Word . . .

January 11, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

His heart was a purple castle.
—Patrick Süskind, Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, 1986.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

January 10, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
A proposed ice skating safety costume (inflatable), from the Jan. 10, 1891 issue of Punch.


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

January 9, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Suddenly a green- rose rainbow appears right on your ridge with steamy clouds all around and an orange sun turmoiling . . .

What is a rainbow,
Lord? a hoop
For the lowly


. . . and you go out and suddenly your shadow is ringed by the rainbow as you walk on the hilltop, a lovely- haloed mystery making you want to pray.
—Jack Kerouac, Alone on a Mountaintop, from Lonesome Traveler, 1960

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the mystic triangle . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 8, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Q: What do you call cryptic questions such as these:

     What is the sound of a kidnapped baby crying in Arizona?

     What was Barton Fink's face before he moved to L.A.?

A: Zen Coens
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

January 7, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

January 6, 2008

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of Mystery Hill . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 5, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

The sky was a velvety black paw pressing on the white landscape with a feline delicacy, stars flying like sparks from its fur.
—Tom Robbins, Jitterbug Perfume, 1984.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

January 4, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

FFIII writes: "I really wanted to get a copy of [Professor Oddfellow's] Data Mining and The Depths of Madness for framing.  I also liked How to Call a Bluff."

A variety of archival-quality Professor Oddfellow prints are available from Zazzle, specialists in "infinite one-of-a-kind-ness."


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
What's it called when you order a go-cup of Pepsi because they don't offer Coke?  A concession.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .

January 3, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Negatives positives . . . the hallucinatory play of black and white . . . I deduced therefrom, philosophically speaking, that white and black signs, and the inevitable antinomy of the ideas of the past, like day and night’, angel and devil’, good and evil’, are in reality complementaries, a fertile androgynous idea . . . White and black, yes and no, it is the binary language of cybernetics, making possible the building of a plastic bank in electronic brains. White and black, it is the indestructibility of art- thought and hence the perenniality of the work in its original form.
—Victor Vasarely, 1965; quoted in Optic Nerve: Perceptual Art of the 1960s by John Houston, 2007.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
When there's instant gratification to spare, it's "extant gratification."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

January 2, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
From the mind and pen of Jonathan Caws-Elwitt:


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the mystery . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

January 1, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Down the long road into Statesville, he walked toward a realm of gold, sunset had turned all the world to gold.

And next morning, he was on the great road again, walking into sunrise gold. The sun came up behind him like a big red full moon, a red that was full of yellow, a red orange warm gold that absorbed all the pinks and pale reds of the morning.
—Julian Lee Rayford, Cottonmouth, 1941.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Origami cranes never go out of fashion, but here's a half-submerged hippopotamus by Leong Cheng Chit, wet-folded from a rectangle of mulberry foil.


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.