CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
October 31, 2008

Staring at the Sun (permalink)

Vampire by Edvard Munch

Vampiric Colors

"Color?" said the vampire. "Is that all? Color iss eazy-peazy. How soon do you vant it?"
—Terry Pratchett, The Truth, 2001

Black silk, white incisors, blood-red lips, pallid complexions, deep purple velvet. Truly, "the horror of vampirism is expressed in color" (Diane Negra, The Irish in Us, 2006). The timeless lore of vampires has left a colorful and enduring mark on world culture. If you think most vampires sport Transylvanian accents and Carpathian fashions, think again. Chinese vampires (Geung-Si), for example, have a rich history of their own. Their limbs stiffened by rigor mortis, Chinese vampires move by hopping, their arms outstretched like zombies to seize their prey. They have long fangs and even longer fingernails, which they use to stab their victims and suck out the life energy. They wear traditional Manchu robes of black silk and round black hats from the Qing dynasty. What turns a corpse into a Chinese vampire? A lingering lust for revenge, an improper burial, a violent death, or a mischievous spirit. Chinese vampires can be stopped only by Taoist priests armed with magic talismans. The priest paints red calligraphy onto a yellow strip of parchment and slaps the talisman onto the vampire's ghastly white forehead, rendering him immobile. Makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin has a tip for making very dark vampire colors less extreme and severe. He recommends surrounding the vampire color with taupe or brownish-gray (Jessica Pallingston, Lipstick, 1999).

Because vampires are allergic to sunlight, vampiric colors often evoke the shades of midnight:

Vampire's midnightdracula's coming
Midnight Screamdance of the vampire
Moscow Vampirevampire blood
vampirevampires in love.


by LOKAOTICO

As vampires are sustained by blood, it comes as no surprise that there are a great many sanguinary colors:

Vampire Woundvampire
Vampiress KissVampire
Vampire Lipsvampire sex
Vampire Cocktailvampire delight
Vampiric LustVampire's dream


by Wellstone

It takes a pointed tooth to draw blood:

vampire teethvampire teeth
Left Vampire FangRight Vampire Fang

Immortality carries with it the dust of the ages:

Vampire Dustgrigio vampiro
TransylvaniaWe end as dust


by Jim Frazier

No bedroom of the living dead would be complete without a coffin:

Vampire Coffincoffin
coffin in the cellarDracula's Bedspread
Coffin CushionsCoffin Lining
Coffin Linerthe coffin

Some vampires sport unnatural complexions:

vampiricvampire kiss
Undead GreenVampire Skin
vampire skinundead
bianco vampiroVampire Tan

The classic vampire mane is black:

Vampire Hairmidnight black hair

Vampiric wardrobes reflect the height of gothic fashion:

vampire's cloakvampire jacket
Count DraculaVampiric Black
VampiresPurple Gothic

Has there ever been a vampire with garlic breath?

vampire garlicgarlic_breath


by msmall

The easiest way to break a vampire's heart is with a wooden stake:

wooden stakestaked

A talisman can also do the trick:

talisman.Talisman
flowing calligraphyRed Ink

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
Library Journal reviewed our Magic Words: A Dictionary in the Oct. 15 issue:

Despite its undeniable appeal to New Age audiences, Conley's (One-Letter Words) book of more than 700 words and phrases is just as relevant to the linguist and language enthusiast as it is to Occult followers. A vividly written introduction includes contemplations on ritual and pronunciation, and each multi-paragraph entry explains meanings, origins, and literary references. Like an academic work, the text is liberally footnoted, citing pop culture, literary, or Internet uses of the word or phrase—although it occasionally omits significant references. Recommended for pop culture, New Age, and language libraries.

Meanwhile, don't miss our interview at The Tarot Channel, about Magic Words: A Dictionary.

Also, our Carte Blanche Atlas of blank maps was praised for its "useful insights" over at Year Two Blog.

---

Jeff writes:

I believe congratulations are in order!  So many positive reviews . . . but then, that's as it should be.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"Writing is a way of speaking without being interrupted." —Jules Renard
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint Limon
Patron of Lemonade.


Photo by Trevira.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .

October 30, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"I am the unknown I carry in me." —Monsieur Teste, a.k.a. Paul Valéry
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
"'And? And?' he prompted."
Katherine Kurtz, The Temple and the Crown, 2001, p. 178


Image by Tobias Battenberg.  Image source
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Dawn, and the little flocks of silver- enameled tanks on every hill and the fifty- five thousand barrel tanks in the valley made you think of diamonds in a dime- store brooch so much wealth in such an outlandish place.

The purple ribbons of oil splashed down every hill and turned brown and gold in the sun. Up the valley the lights on the drilling rig winked out.
Jim Thompson, Character at Iraan, 1930; Fireworks: The Lost Writings of Jim Thompson, 1988.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 29, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
I wonder if they performed this "Rain or Shine."


Photo by crnphoto.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

October 28, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
We were honored to illustrate a tiny new publication by minimalist poet Geof Huth, entitled "I aye eye." 
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Photo via ffffound.
"You'll be standing to one side of worry, invisible enough to feel a principle of form spiraling like a galaxy's recursion of nesting light."
Christopher Buckley, Camino Cielo (1997)
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .

October 27, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
I graduated Sumac Cumin Ledum from the Culinary Academy.

Jonathan responds:

ConGRANULATIONS!

June adds:

My cinnamons exactly!
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

October 26, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
"A most concrete ghost, it has revealed itself in office blocks towering above Kuala Lumpur."
Rajeswary Ampalavanar Brown, Chinese Business Enterprise, 1996


"I Believe I Can Walk Through Walls" by New York artist Reed Barrow.  Image via BB-Blog.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Six women dancing together on a red stage naked / The leaves are green on all the trees in Paris now / I will be home in two months and look you in the eyes
—Allen Ginsberg, "Message, 1958," from Collected Poems 1947—1997.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 25, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Michele C.

Pure Photography: The Black and White of a Fleeting Artistic Movement

Established in 1932, the Pure Photography movement boasted a palette with a maximum of two colors. Pure photography was defined as being completely free of any other artistic movement. That meant it had to be free of qualities of technique, composition, and objective. Due to its strict requirements, the possible body of work was severely limited. That's why the visual poet Geof Huth calls Pure Photography "one of the shortest artistic movements of all time." As it is such a narrow school of art, Huth was able to complete all the possible works of the genre in a single day. He explains: "A black & white photograph might look like it is made out of grays, but it is made out of bits of black organized on the surface of a white sheet, so in its purest form it is either all black or all white."

Black_photophotographers_white

photo by DitB
by DitB

Huth's technique was simple: "The black photograph must be exposed to uncontrolled light, so I turned on the lights in the darkroom, exposed the paper & then developed the photograph. The white photograph must never be exposed to light; it is fixed so that it never changes from its white beginnings. I framed one of these photographs in a bright metal frame, but I don't know where it is anymore."

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

Jeff writes:

I'd never even heard of the Pure Photography movement, but freedom from the "qualities of technique, composition, and objective" is intriguing, particularly in the context of photography. It just doesn't get much more minimalist — I especially love that strict black and white palette! And in 1932 no less!

I loved this, too: "Due to its strict requirements, the possible body of work was severely limited." Ha!

Thanks for the enlightening (and entertaining) article!


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)

From the inimitable Tom Weller, author of the classic Science Made Stupid, comes this "minim" (the perfect answer to the maxim):
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

October 24, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
Information artist Sam Winston says, "I was always going to be a writer but it was when I discovered other alphabets – of colour, shape and form – that's when things really began to get interesting."


A detail from "Dictionary Story Print" by Sam Winston.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint Snowshoe
Patron of Winter Sports.

Jonathan Caws-Elwitt quips: "He can walk on water, weather permitting."


Photo by trailerfullofpix.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .

October 23, 2008

Book of Whispers (permalink)
"I am not so rash, I trust, as to essay to pluck out the heart of the mystery.  But the game of coming to close quarters with the riddle is more than worth the candle."
John Livingston Lowes, The Road to Xanadu: A Study in the Ways of the Imagination, 1927
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
The next day, he accidentally erased his recording.


Photo by Jaimie Warren.  Via Rebelart.net.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

It was one of those blue and lavender nights when the luminous color seems to have been blown over the scene with an air brush. Even the darkest shadows held some purple.
—Nathaniel West, The Day of the Locust, 1933.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 22, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #13:

"The only reality, or at least the only certainty, is our consciousness, or the aggregate of our mental states."
—Antonio Llano, Appleton's Popular Science Monthly, March 16, 1896
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .

October 21, 2008

Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Who is slightly funnier: a homosexual or an ordinary person with a job?

Clue:  This is according to the television series “Will and Grace”

Answer:  Homosexuals  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Richard Hunter, World Without Secrets (2002), p. 78
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
All the members of the orchestra date one another.  But I don't know if anyone has made it to third bass yet.

---

Gary Barwin
writes,

Which reminds of that terrible joke:

Playing music

Last summer, the local orchestra decided to play Beethoven's 9th symphony.

However, it being quite hot, the players were working up quite a sweat, until a neighbor let them use the ventilators in her house.

However, the wind from these ventilators was causing the notes to blow all over the place, so they had to tie them down to the note holders.

The din from the ventilators was so bad that the bassists decided it didn't matter if they downed a few drinks and got royally drunk.

Two of the bassists got so drunk that they passed out.

One of the violinists, in disgust, decided to go home but slipped and fell.

Thus, it was the bottom of the 9th, the bassists were loaded, the score was tied with two men out, and the fans were roaring wild when one of the players slid home.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"It was cruel of you to call her Q-tip," Cathy said.
"I referred to her by that name but I never called her that, I swear," I said.
Bryan Jay Ramsey, Dreams Within A Dream: The Portal


Illustration via ffffound.
> read more from The Right Word . . .

October 20, 2008

Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)

Click to test your ESP.
Our new online telepathy test was commissioned by our friends at the Official Prisoner Appreciation Society, dedicated to the cult 1967 TV series The Prisoner.  In the episode entitled "The Schizoid Man," actor Patrick McGoohan uses a special deck of symbol cards to test Extra Sensory Perception.  Exercise your own inner eye with our interactive feature.
> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
It's now known that ancient Chinese builders used sticky rice as mortar, and that was the secret of their structures' longevity.

But did you know that the bricks they used were made of sugar?

The proof is in the pudding.


Photo via Spiceship.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed it was the ampersand's 40th birthday.


Photo source.

---

Joy Fisher writes:

No semicolon should show up to a party without a gift.  This would be perfect for a 40 year old ampersand to rest his head on.
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

A Black, E white, I red, U green, O blue : vowels, / I shall tell, one day, of your mysterious origins: / A, black velvety jacket of brilliant flies / Which buzz around cruel smells,

Gulfs of shadow; E, white- ness of vapours and of tents, / Lances of proud glaciers, white kings, shivers of cow- parsley; / I, purples, spat blood, smile of beautiful lips / In anger or in the raptures of penitence;

U, waves, divine shudderings of viridian seas, / The peace of pastures dotted with animals, the peace of the furrows / Which alchemy prints on broad studious foreheads;

O, sublime Trumpet full of strange piercing sounds, / Silences crossed by Worlds and by Angels: / O the Omega, the violet ray of Her Eyes!
—Arthur Rimabuad, "Vowels" (Voyelles), 1871, translated by Oliver Bernard, 1962.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 19, 2008

Book of Whispers (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


The Right Word (permalink)

"When life hands you lemons ... say, 'Excuse me.  I asked for limes.'"
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
> read more from The Right Word . . .

October 18, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by wispalex

Ancient Colors

The roots of color technology trace back to Ancient Egypt, where visionary chemists concocted recipes for synthetic pigments. Color (Ancient Egyptian name 'iwen') was an essential part of life in ancient Egypt, adding deeper meaning to everything the people created. Paintings, clothing, books, jewelry, and architecture were all imbued with colorful symbolism. African historian Alistair Boddy-Evans explains that color "was considered an integral part of an item's or person's nature in Ancient Egypt, and the term could interchangeably mean color, appearance, character, being, or nature. Items with similar color were believed to have similar properties."

Egyptologist Anita Stratos informs us that the Egyptian palette had six colors:

photo by Cesras
by Cesras
  • red (desher)
  • green (wadj)
  • blue (khesbedj and irtiu)
  • yellow (kenit and khenet)
  • black (khem or kem)
  • white (shesep and hedj)


Boddy-Evans notes that organic sources yielded two basic colors: crushed bones and ivory provided white pigment, and soot provided black. Red dye was produced from the dried bodies of female scale insects (family Coccidae, genus Kermes). Indigo and crimson pigments came from plants. Most other colors were made from mineral compounds, Stratos notes, "which is why they retained their vibrant colors throughout thousands of years."

Ancient Egyptians considered green to be a positive and powerful color, Egyptologist Geraldine Pinch notes (Magic in Ancient Egypt, 1995). It was associated with fertility, growth and regeneration. "A person was said to be doing 'green things' if his behavior was beneficial or life producing," Stratos says. "Wadj, the word for green, which also meant to flourish or be healthy, was used for the papyrus plant as well as for the green stone malachite. Green malachite was a symbol of joy. In a larger reference, the phrase 'field of malachite' was used when speaking of the land of the blessed dead."

egyptian_green

Blue and turquoise were considered divine colors and appropriate for sacred places. Stratos explains that "Dark blue, also called 'Egyptian' blue, was the color of the heavens, water, and the primeval flood, and it represented creation or rebirth. The favorite blue stone was lapis lazuli, or khesbed, which also meant joy or delight. . . . There is also a theory that blue may have been symbolic of the Nile and represented fertility, because of the fertile soils along the Nile that produced crops. Because the god Amen (also spelled Amon or Amun) played a part in the creation of the world, he was sometimes depicted with a blue face; therefore, pharaohs associated with Amen were shown with blue faces also. In general, it was said that the gods had hair made of lapis lazuli."

egyptian_skyegyptian_turquoise

Stratos explains that red was considered a very powerful color, "symbolizing two extremes: Life and victory as well as anger and fire. Red also represented blood. . . . In its negative context of anger and fire, red was the color of the god Set, who was the personification of evil and the powers of darkness, as well as the god who caused storms. Some images of Set are colored with red skin. In addition, red-haired men as well as animals with reddish hair or skins were thought to be under the influence of Set. A person filled with rage was said to have a red heart."

egyptian_redancient_egypt

"In the Graeco-Egyptian papyri, a special kind of red ink, which included ochre and the juice of flaming red poppies, was used," Pinch says.

The color yellow "designated the eternal and the indestructible, also considered to be qualities of the sun and of gold," says Stratos. "Many statues of the gods were either made of gold or were gold-plated; in fact, Egyptians believed the gods' skin and bones were made from gold. Tomb paintings showed gods with golden skin, and pharaohs' sarcophagi were made from gold, since the belief was that a deceased pharaoh became a god." Incidentally, the color orange would have been classified as yellow in Ancient Egyptian times.

egyptian_goldEgyptian_Sun

Sometimes, Stratos notes, yellow was used interchangeably with white. "White denoted purity and omnipotence, and because it had no real color, it represented things sacred and simple. White was especially symbolic in the religious objects and ritual tools used by priests. Many of these were made of white alabaster, including the Apis Bulls' embalming table. 'Memphis,' a holy city, meant 'White Walls,' and white sandals were worn to holy ceremonies. White was also the color used to portray most Egyptian clothing."

Egypt

Black was a symbol of night, death, and the underworld. Stratos explains: "We see this reflected in Osiris, who was referred to as 'the black one' because he was king of the afterlife, and also with reference to the god of embalming, Anubis, who was portrayed as a black jackal or dog. Because Queen Ahmose-Nefertari was the patroness of the necropolis, she was often shown with black skin." Black also symbolized resurrection, an idea likely related to "the dark silt left behind by the annual Nile flood. From the most ancient Egyptian times, Egypt was known as Kemet, or 'the black land,' because of the dark soil of the Nile Valley; therefore, the color black symbolized Egypt itself. When used to represent resurrection, black and green were interchangeable."

cosmic_amulet

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #12:

"The sole certainty is that only our unbending will toward the future gives meaning and support to the merest effort."
Richard Wolin, Labyrinths, 1995
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .

October 17, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Some uncommon wisdom from unlikely sources:

• Never go with a hippie to a second location.  (30 Rock, NBC series)
• Never drink with a savage.  (The Western Lands by William Burroughs)
• The best way to avoid a confrontation with a thug: never walk through a bad neighborhood.  (Maharishi Mahesh Yogi)
• Nothing is better calculated to antagonize the wealthy than to ask for a small loan. (The Western Lands by William Burroughs)
• There is no cure for injustice other than committing another injustice to correct the first—let the river wash away the bad blood.  (Ancient Evenings by Norman Mailer)

If you've heard uncommon wisdom from unlikely sources, please share!
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Tic Tac Toe Story Generator (permalink)


INSTRUCTIONS:
In alternate turns, complete a row, column, or diagonal with three X’s or O’s. Each X and O has a discrete unit of meaning, as detailed in the Dictionary of One-Letter Words. Choose and write a letter meaning alongside each X and O placed in the grid; don’t repeat a letter meaning within the same game. Number each turn on the grid, to establish the linear progression of the story. When the game is finished, use the sequence of key words to construct your story, adding connecting phrases as necessary.

Click here for a printable template.  Thanks to Gary Barwin for inspiration!
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Tic Tac Toe Story Generator . . .


Unicorns (permalink)

Here's what step 11 looks like.
How to draw a unicorn in 11 easy steps.
> read more from Unicorns . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

Photo by skeletonkrewe.
Saint Ray Ray
Patron of Frequent Flyer Miles.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .

October 16, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Dedicated to Gary Barwin.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Oh say can you see in the dark you / observe Minerva nerveless in Nirvana because Zeus rides reindeer thru Bethlehem’s blue sky. / Its Buddha sits in Mary’s belly waving Kuan Yin’s white hand at the Jang- tze that Mao sees, / tongue of Kali licking Krishna’s soft blue lips.
—Allen Ginsberg, Holy Ghost on the Nod over the Body of Bliss, 1966, from Collected Poems 1947-1997.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 15, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt shares this first-rate bit of whimsy:

Wikipedia: "The Dead Sea is a salt lake between Israel and the West Bank to the west, and Jordan to the east.  It is 420 metres (1,378 ft) below sea level ..."

JC-E: Now, that's what I call low sodium!
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Don't miss Dr. Boli's "Prognostication Engine," which you can print out and build yourself.


> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #11:

"The one certainty is that we will extract more energy from our environment, not less."
—Peter W. Huber, The Bottomless Well, 2006
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .

October 14, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
The visual poet Geof Huth contends that we are all lettrists:

The letters, those atoms of writing's structure, appeal to us through their shapes, their familiarity, and the tiny strands of meaning they contain. We love them beyond their ability to be loved, because in the end they are everything. Without the letters, we could not write a single word, without words no sentence, without sentences no paragraphs, and finally no books.

The letter is all we need, and all the night permits us.

See Geof's full discussion here.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Jeff writes:

After reading this, I decided to perform a little spot-gazing of my own.  As it turns out, my dog has spots not only on his coat but on his skin as well.  Now I'm frightened because I don't know which spots to trust.  Can you advise?

Prof. Oddfellow responds:

When spots form in layers, even the most innocuous of queries becomes unpredictable.  But don't feel discouraged!  Think of your dog as an artist's canvas with several layers of paint.  Each layer is a chapter of an evolving story.  If a heart-shaped mark on the skin (the sign of a homebody) is covered by a bone-shaped spot on the fur (the sign of contentment), that tells us that your dog finds his greatest comfort on his own turf.  If the mark of a duck (symbolizing devotion) is covered by the mark of a fang (nervousness), your dog is stressed over his fidelity.  Of course, a dog's spots are more than skin-deep; they go all the way to the bone.  But the superficial layers offer plenty food for thought!
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

October 13, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

I can remember every second of that morning, if I shut my eyes I can see the deep blue colour of the sky and the mango leaves, the pink and red hibiscus, the yellow handkerchief she wore round her head, tied in the Martinique fashion with the sharp points in front, but now I see everything still, fixed for ever like the colours in a stained- glass window. Only the clouds move.
—Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea, 1966.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 12, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
This gem is from Dr. Boli's Encyclopedia of Misinformation:

"Charles Dickens was not paid by the word: that is a popular misapprehension. He was paid by the syllable."
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Pfft! (permalink)
"'Pfft — pfft — pfft!'  That is the stars whistling for the soul of the shaman." —John MacDonald, The Arctic Sky: Inuit Astronomy, Star Lore, and Legend
* The British expression "noise stroke gesture" (in American parlance, "noise slash gesture" or "noise/gesture") refers to the intriguing fact that some vocal expressions seem to call for an accompanying hand gesture.  Take, for example, Pfft!  No matter what its intended meaning, it virtually demands to be echoed in sign language.  Have you noticed a pfft hand gesture in print?  Please share!

For a variety of surprising definitions of pfft, check out my Dictionary of All-Consonant Words at OneLetterWords.com.
> read more from Pfft! . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #10:

"The only certainty we have is this present alive moment, this precious gift of time."
Alexandra Stoddard, Time Alive, 2005
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .

October 11, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by courambel

Colors to Seek Out and Avoid During Exams

Can particular colors affect a student's performance on exams? Color expert Mark D. Fairchild says yes. He cites recent research establishing an "aversion" response to the color red. "If people are exposed to red just before taking an exam they perform slightly less well than if they were exposed to a different color. The cause of this aversion response is not yet known; it could be learned or it could be something intrinsic that causes us to 'fear' red (just a little). This has also been found in sporting events where athletes dressed in red tended to be more successful . . . perhaps because their opponents were viewing it and having an aversion response (rather than the red having an effect on the athlete wearing it)."

Colin Wilson, an investigator of mysteries, offers a reasonable explanation for the red-aversion phenomenon. "Psychological tests have shows that when subjects are exposed to bright red, blood pressure increases and the heartbeat speeds up. (Exposure to green causes a drop in blood pressure; the same is true of dark blue.) . . . This is largely explainable in perfectly ordinary terms. Green soothes us because it is the color of nature. . . . Red excites because it is the color of blood and therefore of violence. Blue has a subduing effect because it is the color of nightfall. This has always been so, since animals first developed color vision" (Mysteries, 2006).

Prof. Fairchild concurs that color most certainly plays a large role in one's emotional life, though the effects are inconsistent. "The effects (both the type and strength) are very individual. A color that makes me feel happy or energized might make you feel sad or tired. There are various reasons for these responses, but essentially they are learned from either cultural practices or significant individual events. There is a lot of misinformation on this topic. A good book for more information is Faber Birren's Color and Human Response."

photo by ---m---
by ---m---

Here are some blues and greens students might consider seeking out at test time:

testexam_on_field
Studygreen_test
teststudyhall
fifth_gradetest
testblueExam_Green

Here are some reds that students might consider avoiding at test time:

test_your_red3rd_grade_homicide
Test_Drawits_a_test
Fight_Test6th_grade
Through_Testsgrade_for_mood__C

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"Language is civilization itself.  The Word, even the most contradictory word, binds us together.  Wordlessness isolates."  —Thomas Mann, The Magic Mountain, translated by John E. Woods.
> read more from The Right Word . . .

October 10, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Librarians do it with a mylar protector.

Chris notes that in his own experience, "Librarians just Dewey it."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"To imagine a form of language is to imagine of form of life." —Cy Twombly.  Via Crystalpunk, via 83russell.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint Pirouette
Patron of Dance Dance Revolution.


Photo by Zorlack.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

We are cross- stitching silk roses on a pale background. We can colour the roses as we choose and mine are green, blue and purple. Underneath, I will write my name in fire red, Antoinette Mason, née Cosway, Mount Calvary Convent, Spanish Town, Jamaica, 1839.
—Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea, 1966.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 9, 2008

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed of a holiday on the islands of San Serriffe.


See large scan at Strange Maps.  Read about the mythical history of San Serriffe at the Museum of Hoaxes.  Thanks, Gordon.
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
In certain "New Age" cities, like Asheville, NC and Sedona, AZ, every time you hail a cab, your palm gets read.  Freedom activists (proponents of so-called "Sibyl Liberties") are fighting for the public's right to private destiny.


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
"In a cloud of people, we humans still can easily recognise and then be attentive to the voice of a particular person(s) we know." —Tetsuya Hoya, Artificial Mind System


Photo by Alexey Titarenko.  Image source.  Via fffound.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .

October 8, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)

Here's our suggested ad campaign for Quaker Foods: "Make every breakfast 'Oat Cuisine'!"
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Literary rapscallion Jonathan Caws-Elwitt wonders whether one can "like it and lump it":

Merriam-Webster tells me that the transitive verb lump can mean "to group indiscriminately," or "to move noisily and clumsily." Now, the imperative phrase lump it, of course, is usually heard as part of "like it or lump it." But my problem is that I'm not sure how to lump it, if called upon. Am I supposed to group things indiscriminately, if I don't like whatever "it" is? Or move something noisily and clumsily? (Chances are, I'm already doing that, without being asked.)

And why all this mutual exclusivity? Cannot one like it and lump it?

Humorist Jonathan Caws-Elwitt's plays, stories, essays, letters, parodies, wordplay, witticisms and miscellaneous tomfoolery can be found at Monkeys 1, Typewriters 0. Here you'll encounter frivolous, urbane writings about symbolic yams, pigs in bikinis, donut costumes, vacationing pikas, nonexistent movies, cross-continental peppermills, and other compelling subjects.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .

October 7, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)

In a discussion of a poem composed via a Ouija Board, we learned that two mediums took dictation in a red dining room, and then a poet edited the transcripts in an adjoining blue room, "supplementing the uppercase text of the dead with his own lowercase commentary."  We were beguiled by that phrase, "the uppercase text of the dead."  It conjures images of ancient Roman script chiseled into marble.

---

Jonathan Caws-Elwitt quips:

Why are they shouting?  It must just be high spirits.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Did you hear about the waggish ornithologist?  He went out on a limb for a lark.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint Zab
Patron of Huge, Impractical Lenses.


Photo by mister bend.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .

October 6, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
Don't miss our extensive interview over at Musings from a Muddy Island, in which we reveal all sorts of hidden, half-hidden, and quarter-hidden secrets, arcane details, and latent possibilities.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
"A little bit of Vegas comes to the Midwest."
Bonnie Miller Rubin, Quick Escapes Chicago, 2002

This photo confirms that "getting lucky" and "a roll in the hay" both mean the same thing.


Photo by Eric Tabuchi.  See his mobile homes gallery for full-sized image. 
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

by tin.G

Both of us were able to look in by standing on the basement, and clinging to the ledge, and we saw ah! it was beautiful a splendid place carpeted with crimson, and crimson- covered chairs and tables, and a pure white ceiling bordered by gold, a shower of glass- drops hanging on silver chains from the centre, and shimmering with little soft tapers. Old Mr. and Mrs. Linton were not there. Edgar and his sister had it entirely to themselves; shouldn’t they have been happy? We should have thought ourselves in heaven!
—Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights, 1847.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 5, 2008

Unicorns (permalink)
A moss-covered unicorn tree, photographed by Tortuga del Desierto.


> read more from Unicorns . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Imagine a party attended by sports fans and meteorologists.  Would the innocuous conversations between strangers be about quantum mechanics, the promise and science of stem cells, and/or the forgotten novels of Victorian women writers?
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"Hail to the sacred vowels!  Supreme salutations to the holy consonants!"
—Prayer to the alphabet, Tibetan monks; quoted by John Stevens in Sacred Calligraphy of the East, third edition, 1995.  Via DJMisc.
> read more from The Right Word . . .

October 4, 2008

P I n K S L i P (permalink)

Honorable mention in our PInKSLiP campaign (read about the concept here) goes to Russell Mael of the band Sparks, for his song "Cool Places," a duet with Go-Go's Jane Wiedlin.  Mael defies gender stereotypes when he sings, "I wanna go where nobody's a fool, and no one says uh, 'hey girl, need a light?'"  While a homophobic reading of that line is possible, we think it most likely that Mael originally wrote the lyric for Wiedlin to sing, and the two switched lines.

Additional kudos to a group of fifth grade boys in a music class who changed "I Kissed a Girl" by Katy Perry to "I Kissed a Squirrel," yet retained the line, "I hope my boyfriend doesn't mind it."
> read more from P I n K S L i P . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Perla

Octarine: The Imaginary Color of Magic

"Octarine" is a color name coined by Terry Pratchett in his Discworld novels. Octarine is said to be the color of magic, as it is apparent in the crackling and shimmering of light. The word refers to the "eighth color," in a spectrum of black, blue, green, yellow, purple, orange, and red. Octarine has been likened to a fluorescent greenish-yellow purple, a combination impossible to perceive with normal human eyes. Imagine, if you can, the marriage of these two swatches:

smile_magicmagic_eyes

Scholar of magic Pete Carroll says he imagines Octarine to be "a particular shade of electric pinkish-purple," a common color in optical illusions. Who can see octarine with the naked eye? Legend has it that only wizards and felines can. That's because an ordinary eye, equipped with rods and cones, would see greenish-yellow purple as gray, black, or nothing at all, while a wizard's eye is said to be equipped with octagons. Some people claim to catch glimpses of octarine in peacock feathers, lightning bolts, rainbows, lens flares, soap bubbles, bonfires, and gemstones.

There can be no doubt that octarine is an imaginary color. But is it preposterous to think that normal human eyes might one day be able to perceive a fluorescent greenish-yellow purple? The folks at the Conscious Entities blog posed that very question: "There has to be an octarine, doesn't there? The mere conceivability of another color shows that the spectrum is not an absolute reality. It seems to me that, just as we can always encounter a completely new smell, there would always be scope for a new color, if our eyes were able to develop new responses the way our nose presumably can. But I don't even need to rely on conceivability. Some insects can see ultraviolet light, for example, and some snakes can see infrared. They must assign to those wavelengths colors which we can't see, mustn't they?"

Their conclusion, however, is negatory: "Look at the way the spectrum forms a closed circle. If we extended it downwards below red, we should simply get another, lower, violet. Now I grant you that the 'lowerness' would have to expressed in some way - possibly as 'warmth.' The colors of the visible spectrum are differentiated in terms of warmth, so perhaps the lower violet would appear distinctly warmer than the one we're used to (great scope for interior decorators...). I repeat, the spectrum is a reality. You can call it a mathematical reality if that helps, but it's real. If we saw color the way we hear pitch, all this would be obvious. But the fact that we can't see color harmonies or more than a single octave of colors means there's never been any scope for a genius to come along and produce a regularised interpretation of the spectrum, the way J.S.Bach did for the musical scale."

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #9:

"Jazz is perhaps the lone certainty."
Ronald Michael Radano, New Musical Figurations, 1993
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .

October 3, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)

BibleAcrossAmerica.com
One rarely sees the word Bible in its verb form, but here it is painted across a luxury motorhome: "Bible Across America."  We've previously heard of "imbibing across America," in terms of winery tours.  If the motorhome got pulled over for speeding, would the patrolman "throw the book" at them, or vice versa?
> read more from The Right Word . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
It's not "all in my head."  I looked.


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Strange Dreams (permalink)
"We don't form our dreams out of just our own souls.  We dream anonymously and communally, though each in his own way.  The great soul, of which we are just a little piece, dreams through us so to speak, dreams in our many different ways its own eternal, secret dream—about its youth, its hope, its joy, its peace, and its bloody feast."
Thomas Mann, The Magic Mountain  (a mountain of a masterpiece!)
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint C. Ray
Patron of Unfortunate Events.


Photo by skeletonkrewe.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .

October 2, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

WomenInBoxes.com
From our outpost at Blogger:

The documentary Women in Boxes, spearheaded by Blaire Baron Larsen, is a springboard for pondering the deeper significance of magicians placing their assistants in boxes.  As performers, the duos likely have no idea what archetypal stories they're playing out.  But something profound is going on, in light of the renowned psychologist Erich Neumann, a trailblazer in feminine psychology and the Great Mother archetype of world mythology.  Applying Neumann's insights to stage magic, the prototypical female assistant symbolizes the anima -- that part of the psyche connected to the world of the subconscious -- the soul, if you will.  The anima can be human or animal (hence the great tradition of women magically transforming into tigers).  The prototypical male magician symbolizes the hero archetype on a quest toward individuality.  In order to be truly creative, the magician's masculine world of ego consciousness must make a link to the feminine assistant's world of the soul.  Through "sawing a lady in half," the magician tries to divide the anima, not so much to conquer her but to understand her like a scientist.  He tries to contain the anima in a box, not to imprison her but to accommodate, encompass, and give definite form to her curvaceous amorphousness.  Indeed, there's nothing inherently "sexist" about the roles of stage magician and assistant; the two form a single personality struggling to become integrated.  (Read more of Neumann's wisdom in his indispensable The Origins and History of Consciousness.  Here's a link to Camille Paglia's profile of Neumann).  See the Women in Boxes website for the trailer, gallery, and DVD information.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"The simple idea that 'history is written by the winners,' is giving way to the realization that history is, of course, written by the writers; and that’s often quite a difference." —Sha Na Na and the Invention of the Fifties
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
"Even in winter, with a light coating of snow on the ground, Blueberry was beautiful and charming."
Janelle Taylor, Haunting Olivia, 2006


Image source.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Tic Tac Toe Story Generator (permalink)


INSTRUCTIONS:
In alternate turns, complete a row, column, or diagonal with three X’s or O’s. Each X and O has a discrete unit of meaning, as detailed in the Dictionary of One-Letter Words. Choose and write a letter meaning alongside each X and O placed in the grid; don’t repeat a letter meaning within the same game. Number each turn on the grid, to establish the linear progression of the story. When the game is finished, use the sequence of key words to construct your story, adding connecting phrases as necessary.

Click here for a printable template.  Thanks to Gary Barwin for inspiration!
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Tic Tac Toe Story Generator . . .


Unicorns (permalink)
A chariot pulled by unicorns is part of the Shadowscapes Tarot.
> read more from Unicorns . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

When they’re dancing where the lights are soft and low, / All the glory of the sunset’s purple glow / Is reflected in your eyes where beauty dwells, / And I hear blue and orange birds and silver bells.
—"Blue and Orange Birds and Silver Bells," recorded by Della Reese with the Jimmy Hamilton Orchestra in 1953.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

October 1, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)

"All ancient [writing] systems . . . hold one idea in common: writing is divine, inherently holy, with powers to teach the highest mysteries; writing is the speech of the gods, the ideal form of beauty. The Egyptians were taught writing by Toth, the scribe of the gods, and named their script ‘the divine’; Jehovah engraved the letters with his fingers when he gave the Commandments to the Hebrews; the Assyrian god Nebo revealed the nature of cuneiform to his people; Cangjie, the four-eyed dragon-faced wizard, modeled the Chinese characters after the movements of the stars, the footprints of birds, and other patterns that occurred in nature; and in India the supreme god Brahma himself gave knowledge of letters to men." —John Stevens, Sacred Calligraphy of the East, third edition, 1995.  Via DJMisc.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.