CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
June 30, 2008

Inflationary Lyrics (permalink)
SONG: Shadows on a Dime
ARTIST: Ferron

ORIGINAL LYRIC:

This window makes a perfect frame
For New England leaves like painted rain
They hold me as I hold this train
All shadows on a dime.

ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION:

This window opened to a crack
frames New England leaves on the tarmac
They hold me as I traverse this track
All shadows on a greenback.
* Payphones used to take dimes, but now they take quarters.  Isn't it time to update song lyrics to reflect the realities of inflation?  Alas, it's vastly easier to rhyme the word "dime" than the word "quarter," but here at Inflationary Lyrics Headquarters we have risen to the challenge.  Please join the fun and share your own inflationary lyrics, with both the "before" and "after" versions!
> read more from Inflationary Lyrics . . .


Glued Snippets (permalink)
A collaged story we assembled for a singular Ken and henceforth dedicate to all the Kens of the world. Click on the thumbnails below to view an enlarged version in a new window.


Page 1: wish upon a star

Page 2: bull and bugle

Page 3: praying

Page 4: bird

Page 5: bell

Page 6: pastoral

Page 7: perspective

Page 8: flowers

> read more from Glued Snippets . . .

June 29, 2008

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint Decapitado
Patron of Headlessness.


Photo by Ricaro Limongi.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the void . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 28, 2008

Unicorns (permalink)
"The unicorn shot through the forest on fiery hooves, like a comet."
Philip McCall II, Before You Imagine, Forget All You Know (2006)


Photo by Routine Escape.
> read more from Unicorns . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

These flowers of the plum / How red, how red they are, / How red, indeed!
—Izen (17–18th c.), a haiku; from The Moment of Wonder: A Collection of Chinese and Japanese Poetry, edited by Richard Lewis, 1964.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

June 27, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
Our beloved friend Martha at the Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar assures us that reports of the semicolon's demise have been exaggerated.  "We just need to find the punctuation equivalent of Uma Thurman," she suggests.  What on earth does she mean?  See her piece entitled "Has Modern Life Killed the Semicolon?"  And don't miss Martha's latest book, Things that Make Us [Sic].
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
"Albert Einstein didn't discover relativity in a vacuum."
Codename Gimmick
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint Eugene
Patron of Normal Cell Division.

HaggisVitae explains how Saint Eugene came to be:

Everyone I know has been deeply affected by cancer. Either someone in their family has it, or has had it, or they have or a friend or someone they know and respect. I sit at a microscope all day long looking for cells that have changed, lost control, gone wrong and turned into cancer cells.

One day I was sitting thinking that there should be someone to take up the job of Patron Saint for normal cell division. Because if there is something to pray for, it's just that. And there are just so many patron saints for such unimportant things--this seemed very important. I am not catholic, nor religious for that matter, but I wanted to create an image that could be a place where science and religion could co-exist and use their powers for good.

So, may all your cells divide normally.

I chose the name Eugene because the prefix EU in science means normal or good. And gene--well that speaks for itself. I've uploaded the huge image straight from my camera so you could tool around and see the background details if you'd like to. Eugene may already be a patron saint of something else. That's ok, I don't think he'll mind this task.

He stands on a cell in metaphase where all the paired chromosomes are lined up. In front of him is that same cell in telephase, where the chromosomes have gone to their respective sides and are ready to be the nuclei of their own daughter cells. Above him to each side are the final two daughter cells, perfect and just like each other.

Unrelated:

The Patron Saint of Mud Puddles.


Photo by HaggisVitae.  See full size here.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .

June 26, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From the inimitable Tom Weller, author of the classic Science Made Stupid, comes this "minim" (the perfect answer to the maxim):


> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Adventure Addict

Colors for Life with Tattoo Inks

Colors inserted into the skin's dermis are known as tattoos or dermal pigmentation. A practice traced back to Neolithic times, tattooing remains popular worldwide for body decoration, initiatory rites, religious observance, love vows, and identification, to name but a handful of uses. Tattoo inks come in nearly unlimited variations, the most popular being red, green, yellow, blue, and white, which is used as a tint (source). Tattoo inks comprise of a variety of pigments in carrier solutions. The pigments may be organic-based, mineral-based, or plastic-based. The plastic-based pigments offer the most vibrant colors. "The inks used in tattoos and permanent makeup (also known as micropigmentation) and the pigments in these inks are subject to FDA regulation as cosmetics and color additives. However, FDA has not attempted to regulate the use of tattoo inks and the pigments used in them and does not control the actual practice of tattooing. Rather, such matters have been handled through local laws and by local jurisdictions. . . . Although a number of color additives are approved for use in cosmetics, none is approved for injection into the skin. Using an unapproved color additive in a tattoo ink makes the ink adulterated. Many pigments used in tattoo inks are not approved for skin contact at all. Some are industrial grade colors that are suitable for printers' ink or automobile paint" (source).

How permanent are tattoo pigments? Even severe burning often fails to obliterate them. However, tattoo pigments can fade over time, especially red and yellow. Lighter tattoo colors, such as pink, fade more quickly than darker ones. Tattoo colors typically fade with sun exposure, so sunscreen is recommended to keep them looking vivid. Over time, tattoo pigments drift deeper into the dermis, blurring their detail. "At present, no one laser can remove all tattoo colors well. Black, blue, and green inks are all well absorbed by red and infrared light lasers," says dermatologist Randall Roenigk. "Red inks are not well absorbed by red or infrared light lasers, but are well absorbed by green light lasers. . . . Purple, yellow, and orange pigments are often more difficult to eradicate and respond variably well to green, red, and infrared light lasers" (Roenigk & Roenigk's Dermatologic Surgery, 1996).

tattoo_fading

Tattoo inks carry the risks of allergic reactions and toxicity triggered by sunlight exposure and heavy metals.


[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of vitality . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 25, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
"All I can say is, 'Yoda-Leia-hee-hoo.'"
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt, in response to "The Dark Side of Switzerland"


"The Dark Side of Switzerland" by Alberto Russo.  See details of the work here.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"The authorities 'sat down on it like a ton of bricks.'"
Charles Allen and Michael Mason, Tales from the South China Seas (1983)


Art by Mike Womack.  See his portfolio here.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
The Origami Swami showed me how to unfold my mind.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

June 24, 2008

Unicorns (permalink)
Newborn unicorns are best suckled on mermaid milk.  (The image is a detail from Kate Allen's "Milk Teeth."  See full-sized image at Phantasmaphile.)


From the comic "Milk Teeth" by Kate Allen.
> read more from Unicorns . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
From A Surrealist Dictionary by J. Karl Bogartte:

WHORE: Apparatus for telling the future; similar to a tuning-fork.


Image source.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

She looked tall and her hair was the color of a brush fire seen through a dust cloud. On it, at the ultimate rakish angle, she wore a black velvet double- pointed beret with two artificial butterflies made of polka- dotted feathers and fastened on with tall silver pins. Her dress was burgundy- red wool and the blue fox draped over one shoulder was at least two feet wide. Her eyes were large, smoke- blue, and looked bored.
—Raymond Chandler, "The King in Yellow," from his collected short stories, The Simple Art of Murder, 1950.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

June 23, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

Image from coolpositive.  Via ffffound.
Who was it who first said, "You are what you eat"?
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Glued Snippets (permalink)
A collaged story we assembled for a singular Kelsay and henceforth dedicate to all the Kelsays of the world. Click on the thumbnails below to view an enlarged version in a new window.


Page 1: pencils

Page 2: window shade

Page 3: money

Page 4: books

Page 5: heart

Page 6: whore

Page 7: bees

Page 8: birds

Page 9: palmistry

Page 10: shadow puppet

Page 11: monument

Page 12: cat

Page 13: writing table

Page 14: trash can

Page 15: gravestone

Page 16: window washing


> read more from Glued Snippets . . .

June 22, 2008

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint Bollard
Patron of Dented Door Panels.


Photo by the big bambolly.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of victory . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 21, 2008

Unicorns (permalink)


Invisible Unicorn: "Because we know that the fact they are invisible only proves they are magic."
> read more from Unicorns . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

The painting was about four foot by three and had a background of pointillist dots in varying shades of ochre. In the centre there was a big blue circle with several smaller circles scattered around it. Each circle had a scarlet rim around the perimeter and, connecting them, was a maze of wiggly, flamingo- pink lines that looked a bit like intestines.

Mrs Lacey switched to her second pair of glasses and said, What you got here, Stan?’

Honey- ant,’ he whispered in a hoarse voice.

The honey- ant’, she turned to the Americans, is one of the totems at Popanji. This painting’s a honey- ant Dreaming.’
—Bruce Chatwin, The Songlines, 1987.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

June 20, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
From A Surrealist Dictionary by J. Karl Bogartte:

VESTAL: Bright yellow flowers that grow out of mummies.


Illustration source.  See full version here.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .

June 19, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
We misread this headline:

Marine Prepares to Sue Murtha Over Smear

as

Marine Prepares to Sue Martha Over Smear

and we thought, all Martha needed to do was go to a tag sale for some metallic paint, collect some birch twigs from her lower garden, and, incorporating a lace ribbon from grandma's keepsake chest, that smear would have been gone in no time!
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
The following are examples of general properties:
• being square
• being self-identical
• being identical with something
• being next to someone
• being next to a square
• being a square which is larger than any other square
Gary S. Rosenkrantz, Haecceity: An Ontological Essay, 1993


Anna Halprin, Circle the Earth, Dancing with Life on the Line, 1989
photo courtesy of Musee d'Art Contemporain de Lyon, image by Paul Fusco
Via Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Liza with a Z

Coloring By Hand: The American Sign Language Spectrum

Of all the ways to talk about color, sign language must be the most expressive. If you don't already speak sign language, color words are a fun place to start. You'll learn that it doesn't take a palate to discuss a palette.

Orange: This color sign pantomimes squeezing an orange fruit. In front of your mouth, form the letter "c" with your right hand (make a "c" shape by curving your fingers toward your thumb, as if you're grasping a can). Then squeeze your hand into a tight fist. Repeat this squeezing and inflating motion several times.

Blue: Form the letter "b" (fingers extended and held tight, thumb tucked against the palm) with your right hand, to the right of your body. Slightly shake your hand to the right from the elbow, without bending the wrist.

photo by Vertigo25
The sign for "blue" in American Sign Language.
by Vertigo25

Red: Touch your lips with the tip of your index finger. (All other fingers are gathered toward the palm.) With a downward motion, glance the top lip, then the bottom. This motion is performed once, though sometimes people double it.

Brown: Form the letter "b" with your right hand (fingers extended and held tight, thumb tucked against the palm). Move your hand down the side of your right cheek, from your nose to the bottom of your mouth.

Gold: Touch your right ear with your right index finger. As you move your hand away, form the letter "y" (thumb and pinkie outstretched, other fingers tucked into the palm). Then shake your hand slightly.

Silver: Touch your right ear with your right index finger. As you move your hand away, form the letter "s" (a tight fist). Then shake your hand slightly.

Yellow: Form the letter "y" (thumb and pinkie outstretched, other fingers tucked into the palm) with your right hand, to the right of your body. Gently shake your hand to the right from the wrist.

White: Touch your chest with all the fingers and thumb of your slightly curved right hand. Move your hand away (about eight inches) while closing the fingers.

Black: Form the letter "d" with your right hand (index finger extended, middle finger and thumb touching). Touch your forehead with your index finger, then move it toward the right, across the tops of your eyebrows.

Gray: Spread the fingers of both hands. Move your hands in opposite directions, passing the fingers through the open spaces of each hand.

Green: Form the letter "g" with your right hand (index finger and thumb extending as if to pinch, other fingers tucked into the palm). Slightly shake your hand up and down from the wrist.

Pink: Form the letter "p" with your right hand (index and middle fingers extended, palm facing toward you). Draw your hand down your lips.

Purple: Form the letter "p" (index and middle fingers extended, palm facing toward you) with your right hand, to the right of your body. Move it from side to side.

For photos of color signs in action, see Dr. William Vicars' tutorial. For illustrations of color signs, see ASL tutor Joanne Mikola's website.


[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the universe . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 18, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)

Art by Geoff McFetridge.  Via fffound.
"How beautiful in the ambiguous glow, the sun not visible but poised over the horizon, either rising or setting."
Ward Just, The Translator
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .

June 17, 2008

Inflationary Lyrics (permalink)

Image source.
SONG: Pity for a Dime
ARTIST: Creed

ORIGINAL LYRIC:

Signs of losing my faith
Losing my faith
So I sat down for awhile
Forcing a smile
In a state of self-denial
Is it worthwhile
Sell my pity for a dime
Yeah, Just one dime
Sell my pity for a dime
Yeah, Just one dime

ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION:

Signs of losing my faith
Losing my faith
So with hope in descent
I tried to repent
In a state of lament
Is it worthwhile
Sell my pity for a quarter
Yeah, twenty-five cents
Sell my pity for a quarter
Yeah, twenty-five cents
* Payphones used to take dimes, but now they take quarters.  Isn't it time to update song lyrics to reflect the realities of inflation?  Alas, it's vastly easier to rhyme the word "dime" than the word "quarter," but here at Inflationary Lyrics Headquarters we have risen to the challenge.  Please join the fun and share your own inflationary lyrics, with both the "before" and "after" versions!
> read more from Inflationary Lyrics . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Nobody ever walked across the bridge, not on a night like this. The rain was misty enough to be almost fog- like, a cold gray curtain that separated me from the pale ovals of white that were faces locked behind the steamed- up windows of the cars that hissed by. Even the brilliance that was Manhattan by night was reduced to a few sleepy, yellow lights off in the distance.
—Mickey Spillane, One Lonely Night, as quoted by Ayn Rand in The Romantic Manifesto: A Philosophy of Literature.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

June 16, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Having created a coloring book that requires no crayons, an atlas of blank maps, and a dictionary of one-letter words, our new article on "one-bead rosaries" should come as no (or at least minimal) surprise.  Here's an excerpt:

A standard multi-bead rosary is symbolic of advancement, one bead progressing to the next.  The one-bead rosary is an escape from the endless loops and recurring dramas of life.  It is symbolic of arrival.  How can one know one has arrived if one hasn't pinpointed a destination?  The one-bead rosary encapsulates the power to seize destiny and make it one’s own.

Here's the online article.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"In the psychological development of the child, there is a step-by-step progression from the primal smile to the smile of embarrassment, joyful laughter, laughter at a comic situation, laughter in a group, aggressive laughter at an outsider, and finally (a somewhat depressing climax) the laugher of Schadenfreude.  ... [A]t each step laughter signifies an experience of relief (Entlastung), both physically and psychologically."
Peter Berger, Redeeming Laughter: The Comic Dimension of Human Experience (1997)


The evolution of the smile and laugh, from Frans de Waal's "Darwin’s Legacy and the Study of Primate Visual Communication" (PDF), via Cystalpunk
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the unicorn horn . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 15, 2008

Glued Snippets (permalink)
A collaged story we assembled for a singular Jonathan and henceforth dedicate to all the Jonathans of the world. Click on the thumbnails below to view an enlarged version in a new window.


Page 1

Page 2: baskets

Page 3: dancers

Page 4: elephant

Page 5: umbrellas

Page 6: midges

Page 7: wintery

Page 8: nest

Page 9: coping

Page 10: window

Page 11: bridge

Page 12: garlic and olives

Page 13: phrenology


> read more from Glued Snippets . . .

June 14, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Sarah Reed

Conceptions of Color in a Colorless World

A world devoid of color, posited John Arthur Thomson, "would not be uninteresting; but it would be very difficult and dull" (Riddles of Science, 1932). Even on the grayest of days, the human mind struggles to imagine a life destitute of color. However, sometimes imagination isn't required. Damage to the visual cortex can bring about Central Achromatopsia, a defect in color perception that renders the world into a "dull, dirty, faded, gray, washed out" wasteland like something on a black and white television (Alex Byrne and David Hilbert, Readings on Color, 1997). Besides being less pleasurable, a colorless world would be more difficult to navigate. Color experts Vernon Lee and C. Anstruther-Thompson explain how inhabitants of a colorless world would be strangers in a strange land: "Color gives the eye a grip, so to speak, on shape, preventing its slipping off; we can look much longer at a colored object than an uncolored; and the coloring of architecture enables us to realize its details and its ensemble much quicker and more easily. For the same reason colored objects always feel more familiar than uncolored ones, and the latter seem always to remain in a way strange and external; so that children, in coloring their picture-books, are probably actuated not so much by the sensuous pleasure of color as such, as by a desire to bring the objects represented into a closer and, so to speak, warmer relation with themselves" (qtd. in The Enjoyment and Use of Color by Walter Sargent, 1964).

Colorless Life.


by WTL Photos

Even people without the faculty of sight must take color into account, Walter Sargent notes, "because they hear about it as one of the distinguishing qualities of objects." He cites the American activist Helen Keller, the first person with deafblindness to graduate from college. Keller used her imagination, analogies, and senses of touch, smell, and taste to develop her own conceptions of color. As she explained:

I understand how scarlet can differ from crimson because I know that the smell of an orange is not the smell of a grape-fruit. I can also conceive that colors have shades and guess what shades are. In smell and taste there are varieties not broad enough to be fundamental; so I call them shades. There are half a dozen roses near me. They all have the unmistakable rose scent; yet my nose tells me they are not the same. The American Beauty is distinct from the Jacqueminot and La France. Odors in certain grasses fade as really to my senses as certain colors do to yours in the sun. . . . I make use of analogies like these to enlarge my conceptions of colors. . . . The force of association drives me to say that white is exalted and pure, green is exuberant, red suggests love or shame or strength. Without the color or its equivalent, life to me would be dark, barren, a vast blackness. (qtd. in The Enjoyment and Use of Color by Walter Sargent, 1964. Emphasis mine.)

Though blind to the physical world around her, Keller could not and would not allow her thoughts to remain colorless. She always asked for things to be described to her in terms of color, so that she could imagine their resonance. "The unity of the world demands that color be kept in it whether I have cognizance of it or not," she explained. "Rather than be shut out, I take part in it by discussing it, happy in the happiness of those near me who gaze at the lovely hues of the sunset or the rainbow."

The COLOURlovers library testifies to the fact that even colors and palettes seemingly devoid of pigment can be interesting.

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

The fires from the foundry chimneys burning high and glaringly into the night, / Casting their flicker of black contrasted with wild red and yellow light over the tops of houses, and down into the clefts of streets.
—Walt Whitman, from "A Song of Joys"; quoted in Silences: Classic Essays on the Art of Creating, by Tillie Olsen, 1978.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

June 13, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
How is a DJ like a mafioso?

They both have hit lists.  (Thanks, June!)
They both have records.
They both waltz right into clubs.  (Thanks, Mike!)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .

June 12, 2008

Puzzles and Games (permalink)

by GiantChess.com

Taking Chess Beyond Black and White

There's an age-old debate in the Chess world over whether Black or White is the "superior" color. Because White makes the first move, White wins an overwhelming percentage of the time. But what if both sides were Grandmasters? Would there still be a color advantage, or would every game end in a stalemate? The Surrealist artist Marcel Duchamp found his own way to break free of this philosophical "gray area." In 1920, he invented a color version of his favorite board game in an attempt to turn Chess into an artistic activity.

Duchamp's color choices weren't arbitrary. Indeed, as Duchamp expert Francis Naumann points out, the color of each piece served as a "continuous visual reminder of its movement and strategic power." Duchamp's two Rooks were light blue and dark blue. The Bishops were light and dark yellow. As the Queen is a combination of the Rook and Bishop (in terms of power and movement), she blended blue and yellow to form light and dark green. The Knights, sharing no characteristics with other chessmen, were light and dark red. Kings were white and black, and pawns were also white and black.

Naumann notes that Duchamp compared the black and white game of chess to a "pen and ink drawing," likening chess players to painters who created black and white artwork out of pre-existing forms. "Extending Duchamp's analogy," Naumann suggests, "we could then say that playing on the chromatic set would be the equivalent of drawing in color."

Though eyewitnesses recorded seeing Duchamp's painted chessmen in the early 1920s, the remarkable set seems to have become lost in the mists of time. We are left only with anecdotes and our own imaginations.

Today, specialty chess piece manufacturers offer a rainbow of colorful pieces for clients who wish to assemble custom sets. For example, Chaos creates pieces in purple, green, blue, red, white and black, while Giant Chess offers 16 hues including "Edelweis," "white milk," silver, vermillion, chestnut brown, Olympia gold, silver, and soft violet.


[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of two hearts . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 11, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
How do you allow a trouser manufacturer additional freedom?

You cut him some slack.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

An unpowdered complexion pale as any woman’s, / Unrouged lips rosy as any maiden’s. / Eyebrows so long as to meet his eyes, / A form so delicate as hardly to bear his clothes. / A jet- black crepe- silk cap he had, / Matching his face like a crown of jade. / Bright red tapestry- silk shoes he wore, / And stepped as lightly as if walking on clouds.
—Li Yu (1610–1680), The Carnal Prayer Mat, translated by Patrick Hanan, 1990.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

June 10, 2008

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

Click to visit the certificate generator.
Our Honorary Italian Grandmother (and Saint) certificate generator was featured at The Generator Blog this week.

Italian grandmothers are famous for being dauntless, affectionate, and inspirational.  The spirit of Nonna, the archetypal Italian Grandmother, is the zest for life.  Nonna is present whenever a family and guests are well fed and whenever something is created by hand, with care and love.

The Honorary Italian Grandmother (and Saint) certificate is for those rare individuals with a flair for maintaining tradition, improvising without blinking, and turning anything into a nurturing experience.  The certificate is personalized in fine calligraphy, easy for you to generate, and completely free!
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
What did the ghost writer say to the boozy Hollywood legend who mistook him for the author of her autobiography?

"I haven't made your introduction."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

The best clothes donned for Sunday and formal occasions might be of dark material, but daily garb ran the spectrum of colors. Russet was favored, at least in New England, but reds, yellows, blues, and greens were also common. . . .

The lively colored outfits of the first settlers became more subdued as men moved into the backcountry. As James Axtell has remarked, Colonial woodsmen quickly found that for stalking wild game or enemies or being stalked red coats, blue trousers, and yellow waistcoats were signal failures. Far better were the forest’s natural dull shades of brown and green.’
—David Freeman Hawke, Everyday Life in Early America, 1989.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

June 9, 2008

Glued Snippets (permalink)
A collaged story we assembled for a singular Gordon and henceforth dedicate to all the Gordons of the world. Click on the thumbnails below to view an enlarged version in a new window.


Page 1

Page 2: pyramid

Page 3: ruined temple

Page 4: perspective

Page 5: oratory

Page 6: pocket watch

Page 7: heart

Page 8: village



Anthony Dhark
writes:

Gordon is clearly a remarkable and humble guy.
> read more from Glued Snippets . . .


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
"The 'portable staircase' has long been a favourite scheme with many persons, and considerable ingenuity has been directed to this point, but hitherto without any success.  Nothing sufficiently portable has yet been produced, and I fancy, never will."
The Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette (1839)


A staircase in a suitcase, by Anna Nordquist Andersson.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of true peace . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 8, 2008

The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #2:

"In the world in general, the only sure thing is change."
Kenneth L. Carper, Forensic Engineering, 2000
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Today in history: The Supreme Court of the State of Oregon deemed June 8 harmless:


 
 
(Mitchell v. La Follett, decided December 1900.)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

June 7, 2008

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)

Did you know you can generate and download your own symbolic calendar each month (for free)?  Visit our MysteryArts.com/magic site, scroll to the bottom of the page, and give it a try.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by jovike

The Little-Known Meanings of Crazy Color Names vol. 5

Baffling color names often tell entertaining stories, at least to those who are willing to delve beneath the surface. We continue our strange and wonderful adventure into the uncharted fringes of language, where we'll discover new "shades of meaning."

The deep green color called nnnn represents a “closed,” “intimate” hummed sound which “resonates mostly in the head,” as opposed to the “exposed” aaahh sound “which resonates in the chest. You can keep the closed sound a secret, sitting calmly at a committee meeting while others about you are losing their minds” (W. A. Mathieu, The Musical Life).

nnnn

The light gray color claled nnnnnn refers to the “head guy” of “a bunch of dudes from the nameless planet”: "Nnnnnn moved his green hand in a circle, indicating the stream, the forest, the city. 'I know you feel like an alien here,' he said softly. 'But that is because you are thinking too small'" (Bruce Coville, “I, Earthling,” Odder Than Ever).

nnnnnn

The deep blue color called nt represents the word not, written in Roger Bacon’s all-consonant secret code (devised in 1250), as discussed in The Voynich Manuscript by Gerry Kennedy.

nt

The tan color called pff is an indication that one is miffed, as by a failed pursuit: "[W]hen they rounded the corner the bird had disappeared, and though the children searched high and low, there was not a feather to be found. 'Pff! Typical,' Georgie spat, turning back down the stairs" (Justyn Walker, The Magician’s Daughter).

pff

The pink color called pfff refers to a French expression of loneliness, as when everyone is having too much fun to give one a call, as in “Numéro privé” by Erwan Le Goffic.

pfff

The magenta color called pfffft recalls the sound of a stabbing hypodermic needle: "She stuck the needle in, pushed pfffft, just like that, and it started burning immediately" (Janet Laurel, Heart and Soul: What It Takes to Promote Health While Confronting Cancer).

pfffft

The light mauve color called pffft echoes the sound of a balloon deflating: "The volunteer was given a pair of safety glasses and a long bamboo pole to the end of which was secured a match. This was lit, and placed under the balloon. It collapsed with a dull pffft" (D.W. St. John, A Terrible Beauty).

pffft
photo by Chebbs
by Chebbs

The light blue color called phhhh refers to a dismissive expression: "Nobody calls me on the house-phone line, not now that I’ve got my cell phone. Phhhh, I’m not answering it" (Grace Dent, LBD: It’s a Girl Thing).

phhhh

The bright green color called pp means pianissimo (a musician’s directive to perform a passage very softly).

pp

The bright red color called ppp echoes a French expression (usually accompanied by a shrug) meaning “beats me,” as discussed in Street French Slang Dictionary & Thesaurus by David Burke.

Ppp

All of these color name insights are derived from my Dictionary of Improbable Words, which is available for online reading.

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

June 6, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

Lord Whimsy ponders the decline of the necktie:

As if trying to look "casual" wasn't just an uglier kind of affectation! To do away with such baseline standards of adult dress is the illusion of freedom, a lame gesture that leads to even more restrictive mores. Adolescent-minded Boomers won't be satisfied until the only socially acceptable way to present oneself is to dress like a six year-old. And when that day comes, none of us will feel free--just undignified and infantilized. Given the choice, I'd rather be coerced into looking like an adult than a child.

Much is made of the idea that not wearing a tie allows for more self-expression, which is idiotic. Not wearing a tie says "I'm not wearing a tie," and little else. Wearing a tie--with its endless palette of colors, knots and patterns--is where the expression lies. Like Wilde said, "A mask says far more than a face."

See Lord Whimsy's full discussion here.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Saint Tabby
Patron of Meditating Cats

"The radiation of peace and calm by the sages is reflected in a meditating cat," said C. Sivaramamurti.

Saint Tabby loved to quip that her only two vices were pride and litter: a pride of cats and a litter of kittens, that is.  She so adored cats that even her prayers sounded like purring.  (The purrs were actually a form of throat singing, also known as overtone chanting, which Saint Tabby learned while on retreat in Tuva.)  Legend has it that when she knelt in prayer on the ancient brick cloister of San Michele a Ripa, she left behind a set of holy pawprints. 


Photo by Luvi.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


One Mitten Manager (permalink)

 
Dedicated to the people of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan — an inspiration to us all.  (This parody was sparked by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)
> read more from One Mitten Manager . . .

June 5, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
The visual poet extraordinare Geof Huth has been "defining shapes." Some favorite examples:

… three reasons to suspend disbelief

∞ a conclusion of forever

* a star in the mind

? the hook that catches

- a stitch of text

) the end of whispers

{ a crumpled page

! surprising the ending

\ the path to

: two eyes that follow

; two eyes and one grain of sand

^ the hat of the missing

$ the sibilance of sermons

` a grave way of speaking

• dividing the string into threads

† the graveyard of the second thought

§ the pregnancy of sections

For many more, see Geof's "Defining Shapes." Also see Gary Barwin's equally enchanting "Anus Porcupine Eyebrow."
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Inflationary Lyrics (permalink)
SONG: Stop on a Dime
ARTIST: Little Texas

ORIGINAL LYRIC:

So you fall in love and it picks you up
And it takes your heart for a ride
After too many bad roads this heartbroken fool knows
That love can stop on a dime.

ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION:

So you fall in love and it picks you up
In a sleigh that's pulled by reindeer
After too many bad roads this heartbroken fool knows
The buck, the buck stops here.
* Payphones used to take dimes, but now they take quarters.  Isn't it time to update song lyrics to reflect the realities of inflation?  Alas, it's vastly easier to rhyme the word "dime" than the word "quarter," but here at Inflationary Lyrics Headquarters we have risen to the challenge.  Please join the fun and share your own inflationary lyrics, with both the "before" and "after" versions!
> read more from Inflationary Lyrics . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by awalstra

Bolts From the Blue: The Electric Colors of Lightning

Though a lightning bolt radiates pure white light, various atmospheric conditions can tint the brilliant flash into a rainbow of electrical colors. Red, yellow, green, blue, pink, purple, violet, cyan, and orange are all possible lightning colors, depending upon the presence of water vapor, dust, pollution, rain, or hail. Just as lightning is said never to strike twice in the same place, no two lightning bolts are ever exactly the same color. In fact, different branches of the same bolt can exhibit different colors, due to temperature variations. The hotter the bolt, the bluer or whiter it will appear, and the cooler it is, the more orange or red. Because lightning heats the air as it travels, the presence of different gasses will also lend color as they ignite.

Weather expert Dan Robinson explains that different film stocks, exposure times, and camera types can also bring color to lightning. "The same lightning channel can appear blue, purple, red or orange depending on the type of film, length of exposure, and other factors. Slide film is more likely to produce a more purple/blue image, while print film tends to give lightning a more yellow/orange tint."

Fun facts:

  • A lightning bolt can travel 60,000 miles per hour.
  • Lightning temperatures can reach nearly 30,000 K (55,000° F), which is five times hotter than the sun.
  • In addition to thunder storms, dust storms and volcanic ash eruptions can trigger lightning. So can rock launches, aircraft flights, and nuclear detonations.
  • The exact cause of lightning remains "hotly debated" in scientific circles.

 

photo by tenfrozentoes
A double rainbow and lightning bolt, by tenfrozentoes.

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

June 4, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)

Lynda Barry has said, "Keep in mind as you read these words that you are paying no attention at all to the letters of the alphabet" (What It Is, 2008, via DJMisc).

We say, "Speak for yourself!"  We pay all sorts of attention to the letters of the alphabet as we read, as our body of work makes abundantly clear.  We thought everybody read that way!
> read more from The Right Word . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Children are often inclined to be over-fond of rabbits.  They overlook their deplorable hygiene and vicious teeth."


Photo source.  Via ffffound.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of transformation . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 3, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)

For more information, click here.  For a PDF of the primer, click here.
From our friends at Crystalpunk: "Apes in the wild have language and it takes only a small leap of imagination to try to give them a second, human, language.  For over forty years researchers have been trying to do this with increasingly good results.  Our language, when it is passed on to a different species, becomes a new language. PrimatePoetics is born from the realization that this language should be appreciated in its own right, as the greatest revolution in literature since the invention of written Chinese 4000 years ago.  'PrimatePoetics is Here' is the first primer to this new field.  It explains where it comes from, it gives an overview of the field on an ape-by-ape basis and closes with an extensive anthology of relevant scientific and artistic sources.  But most of all 'PrimatePoetics is Here' hopes to give a feel for the outsider charm of the language of the apes."  Here's a link to a PDF of the primer.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

by jipol

a handful of earth sweet and red / to clutch a world / in lands remote from here

a handful of earth, mute / yet bringing a touch of blue from the hills / of trees offering shade against the sun / of a sky filled with blue sun / and of ripening fruit
—Breyten Breytenbach, A Season in Paradise, on South Africa, 1980.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

June 2, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)

Image source.
The "Beehive" was a famous hairdo of the 1960s.  But in 1860, Lorenzo Langstroth patented a frame-style hive that became the standard for the world of bee keeping.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Glued Snippets (permalink)
A collaged story we assembled for a singular Ramesh and henceforth dedicate to all the Rameshes of the world. Click on the thumbnails below to view an enlarged version in a new window.


Page 1

Page 2: steps

Page 3: Statue of Liberty

Page 4: bridge

Page 5: village

Page 6: expression

Page 7: totem poles

Page 8: cat's shadow

Page 9: three dimensional
> read more from Glued Snippets . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the tower . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

June 1, 2008

The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #1:

"The only certainty is what one makes of it."
Joshua David Bellin, The Demon of the Continent, 2000
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"As they circle overhead you wish fervently for a parrot dictionary."
Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac


Photo source.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

After so many cities of marble, dazzling white, here is one entirely pink Jaipur. The eye, weary of excessive light reflected from white walls, rests on these palaces as on the softness of certain textiles faded by time. Our imagination finally finds the city of the legend that has inhabited our dreams since early childhood. . . . Everything is pink, with delicate floral patterns: houses, arches, domes, mosques minarets, pagodas spires all pink.
—Guido Gozzano (1883—1916), Journey Toward the Cradle of Mankind, translated by David Marinelli, 1996.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.