CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
June 30, 2009

The Right Word (permalink)
"The original is never better than the translation.  The translation is worse than another translation, written or not yet written, of the same original."  —Elliot Weinberger, via SocialFiction
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Annotated Ellipses (permalink)

 
* Ellipses don’t merely omit superfluous words or mark pauses.  Far from it!  In an astonishing number of cases, the ellipses illustrate a narrative, inviting the reader to “connect the dots.”  Learn more about Annotated Ellipses at Amazon.com.
> read more from Annotated Ellipses . . .


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"There ought to be a book entitled, Our Friends the Bacteria."
Ashley Montagu & Edward Darling, The Prevalence of Nonsense, 1967, p. 49.
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #59:

"The only certainty is that it is always man who interprets, who assigns meaning.  And that is the gist of the matter for psychology."
Carl Gustav Jung, The Practice of Psychotherapy, 1966
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .

June 29, 2009

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"When a King dies, we, who have to put into words the strange grief and grievous strangeness of the time, then know how ill we have served ourselves." —James Cameron, What a Way to Run the Tribe, 1968
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Overheard at an emergency budget meeting of a pagan family: "We're all going to have to make some sacrifices."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Dedicated to Alexander Bard.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"Someone ought to write a book that would present the truth about the spy business."
John Stockwell, The Praetorian Guard, 1991, p. 43.
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 28, 2009

Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: A dead baby joke, a gun, or a flash flood in a fizzy factory?

Clue:  This is according to poet Willie Smith.

Answer:  A gun.  “Frankly, what is funnier than a gun? ... After all, it is the most surreal act.  Firing at random on a crowd.”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Willie Smith, “Willie Get Your Gun,” Thus Spake the Corpse: An Exquisite Corpse Reader, 1988-1998 (2000), p. 228.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)

From the inimitable Tom Weller, author of the classic Science Made Stupid, comes this "minim" (the perfect answer to the maxim):
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

June 27, 2009

Ampersands (permalink)
A detail of ampersand art by skryingbreath.  See full image here.


> read more from Ampersands . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 26, 2009

A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"There is the thinnest line between progress and decline."
Holly Johnson, "Where Has Love Gone?" Dreams that Money Can't Buy


Ex-Frankie Goes To Hollywood frontman Holly Johnson.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by literary scalawag Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
The erotica writer explained his craft in lay terms.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

June 25, 2009

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Text by William Keckler.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Annotated Ellipses (permalink)

 
* Ellipses don’t merely omit superfluous words or mark pauses.  Far from it!  In an astonishing number of cases, the ellipses illustrate a narrative, inviting the reader to “connect the dots.”  Learn more about Annotated Ellipses at Amazon.com.
> read more from Annotated Ellipses . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 24, 2009

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Q: Are you a member of the Flat Earth Society?

A: No, but I subscribe to their circulars.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The 40 Most Meaningful Things (permalink)

 
> read more from The 40 Most Meaningful Things . . .


Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

June 23, 2009

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)


Who shares an unbirthday with us today?
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
Today someone compared us to Paul Zaloom as Professor Beakman


A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by William Keckler.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which are funnier: magical creatures, angels, or the devil?

Clue:  This is according to a New Age novel

Answer:  Magical creatures.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Josh Emmons, The Loss of Leon Meed (2005), p. 224
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 22, 2009

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From our Magic Words outpost at Blogger:

"I believe that everybody is singing an inner song, and the question isn't whether we are or not — we are! — the question is whether this is a song of power or a song of weakness; whether it is a song of love or a song of hatred.  That's the question."

Eugene Burger, from his interview in The Magic Circular (May 2009)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by Making Dying Illegal.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

The sun was red, the moon was grey,
The earth and sky were as two mountains meeting.

—Dylan Thomas, “From Love’s First Fever to Her Plague”, The Poems of Dylan Thomas, 1971.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #58:

"The only certainty that man can attain is the moral certainty that every human personality has inviolable worth, but no human being has or can have valid metaphysical knowledge."
Carl F. H. Henry, God, Revelation and Authority, 1999
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .

June 21, 2009

Annotated Ellipses (permalink)

 
* Ellipses don’t merely omit superfluous words or mark pauses.  Far from it!  In an astonishing number of cases, the ellipses illustrate a narrative, inviting the reader to “connect the dots.”  Learn more about Annotated Ellipses at Amazon.com.
> read more from Annotated Ellipses . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 20, 2009

Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

June 19, 2009

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Courtesy of William Keckler:

QUESTION: If Roman augurs read entrails, does that mean libraries once had guts?

ANSWER: YES, parchment was indeed made from intestine.
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)


This is a page from our unfinished collection of writing prompts.  All such diagrams may be found in Professor Oddfellow's Forgotten Wisdom: Volume II.
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 18, 2009

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
The plural of Humpty Dumpty is "Humpties Dumpty."


(Inspired by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)  (Photo by Grumbler %-|.)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Annotated Ellipses (permalink)

 
* Ellipses don’t merely omit superfluous words or mark pauses.  Far from it!  In an astonishing number of cases, the ellipses illustrate a narrative, inviting the reader to “connect the dots.”  Learn more about Annotated Ellipses at Amazon.com.
> read more from Annotated Ellipses . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Complete this quotation: “The stooge is the unhappiest character in radio.  He knows that he is funnier than the ______.”

Clue:  This is according to radio comedian Fred Allen, 1947.

Answer:  Comedian.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Alan R. Havig, Fred Allen’s Radio Comedy (1990), p. 70.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

June 17, 2009

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
This one is for typographers:

Ironically, the Isuzu Ascender logo is in all-caps.

[Thanks, Mike!]


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The 40 Most Meaningful Things (permalink)

 
> read more from The 40 Most Meaningful Things . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 16, 2009

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
King Midas had a gilt complex.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"It's a remarkable phenomenon, small town cafe life, that has never been studied fully.  Someone ought to write a book on just that."
V. William Barnett, Sticks and Shovels, 2002, p. 37.
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

June 15, 2009

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Dedicated to Alexander Bard and Mattias Lindblom.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #57:

"The only certainty is that a library is a triumph over nothingness."
—Ilan Stavans, The Essential Ilan Stavans, 2000
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 14, 2009

Annotated Ellipses (permalink)

 
* Ellipses don’t merely omit superfluous words or mark pauses.  Far from it!  In an astonishing number of cases, the ellipses illustrate a narrative, inviting the reader to “connect the dots.”  Learn more about Annotated Ellipses at Amazon.com.
> read more from Annotated Ellipses . . .


Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which digit is funnier: the pinkie or the thumb?

Clue:  This is according to a guide to drawing comics

Answer:  The thumb.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Suck School of Comic Art, Suck.com, (Nov. 7, 1997)
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

June 13, 2009

The Right Word (permalink)
Play it Forward

(our guest blog for Bernie DeKoven's Deep Fun)

Does the march of progress allow space for somersaults? In other words, can we PLAY toward a better condition? In each of the following quotations, the word WORK has been playfully changed to PLAY.

"We need to PLAY toward developing peace in all of our thoughts, words, and actions."
William B. Gudykunst, Bridging Differences, 2003

"We need to PLAY toward a world where healthy anger is the norm and destructive anger the exception."
Jane Middelton-Moz, Boiling Point: The High Cost of Unhealthy Anger to Individuals and Society, 1999

"In order to have clarity, we need to PLAY toward seeing the world as accurately as possible."
Judith V. Jordan, Linda M. Hartling, & Maureen Walker, The Complexity of Connection, 2004

"We need to PLAY toward prevention of overwhelming stress situations that all too frequently result in mental hospitalization."
Robert Lefferts, Getting a Grant, 1978

"We need to PLAY toward ... a collective sense of meaning and significance."
Chris Hackler, Health Care for an Aging Population, 1994

"We need to PLAY toward trusting that whatever happens is 'good.'"
Dzigar Kongtrul, Light Comes Through, 2008

"By accepting the fact that all will not be pleasant at work and that we need to PLAY toward satisfaction and fun in our job, we can more readily dismiss unpleasant happenings."
Jennie Wilting, People, Patients, and Nurses, 1980

"We need to PLAY toward a society that has social policies that reflect humanitarian values."
Emelicia Mizio & Anita J. Delaney, Training for Service Delivery to Minority Clients, 1981

"We need organizational makeovers and we need to PLAY toward the change more rapidly than we have thought in the past."
Lloyd C. Williams, Business Decisions, Human Choices, 1996

"We need to PLAY toward protecting Mother Earth and all living beings."
Jane Middelton-Moz, Welcoming Our Children to a New Millennium, 1999

"We need to PLAY toward our survival as a species."
Bill G. Gooch, Lois Carrier, & John Huck, Strategies for Success, 1983

"PLAY is intrinsically satisfying, ie fulfilling; PLAY means survival; and PLAY provides a level of social connectedness to the larger community."
Samuel M. Natale & Brian M. Rothschild, Values, Work, Education, 1995

Are the altered quotations above still true? Law professor Mary Brandt Jensen reminds us that in the language of copyright law, to "perform" a work is to "recite, render, play, dance, or act it." Perhaps more of our work can be performed with a playful spirit, so as to transform our sense of duty into genuine enthusiasm.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 12, 2009

Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
LucasArts model makers work for scale.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

June 11, 2009

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Dedicated to Alexander Bard, founder of Vacuum, Army of Lovers, and Bodies without Organs.

---


Are you sure that's not an ampersand in disguise?
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Annotated Ellipses (permalink)

 
* Ellipses don’t merely omit superfluous words or mark pauses.  Far from it!  In an astonishing number of cases, the ellipses illustrate a narrative, inviting the reader to “connect the dots.”  Learn more about Annotated Ellipses at Amazon.com.
> read more from Annotated Ellipses . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 10, 2009

The 40 Most Meaningful Things (permalink)

 
> read more from The 40 Most Meaningful Things . . .


Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

June 9, 2009

The Only Certainty (permalink)

A blue rose fractal by William Wu, 2003.  Large version here.
Certainty #56:

"The only certainty is the tautology. (A rose is a rose is a rose.)"
Roger D. Sell, Literature and the New Interdisciplinarity, 1994
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 8, 2009

The Right Word (permalink)
Don't miss James Callan's clever trivia quiz about magic words.  And thanks, Mr. Callan, for recommending our dictionary of magic words for "incantophiles"!
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Dedicated to Alexander Bard, founder of Vacuum, Army of Lovers, and Bodies without Organs.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"Somebody should write a book on autograph etiquette."
—Mark McGwire, qtd. in The Associated Press, Home Run!, 1998, p. 88.
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
What is funnier than sheer nonsense strutting in an imitation of sobriety?

Clue:  This is according to The Messenger magazine, 1904

Answer:  Nothing  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  The Messenger vol. 41 (1904), p. 396.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

June 7, 2009

Annotated Ellipses (permalink)

 
* Ellipses don’t merely omit superfluous words or mark pauses.  Far from it!  In an astonishing number of cases, the ellipses illustrate a narrative, inviting the reader to “connect the dots.”  Learn more about Annotated Ellipses at Amazon.com.
> read more from Annotated Ellipses . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 6, 2009

Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

June 5, 2009

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)


This is a page from our unfinished collection of writing prompts.  All such diagrams may be found in Professor Oddfellow's Forgotten Wisdom: Volume II.  See also our interactive “100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water.
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

June 4, 2009

Annotated Ellipses (permalink)
---

Jonathan Caws-Elwitt writes:

Is it just me, or does the word "hebrides" sound like it ought to be a synonym for "eyebrows"?
* Ellipses don’t merely omit superfluous words or mark pauses.  Far from it!  In an astonishing number of cases, the ellipses illustrate a narrative, inviting the reader to “connect the dots.”  Learn more about Annotated Ellipses at Amazon.com.
> read more from Annotated Ellipses . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
Certainty #55:

"The only certainty seems to be that our planet will become uninhabitable (even for bacteria) when the Sun swells up to become a red giant as it nears the end of its life."
John Gribbin, The Origins of the Future, 2007
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June 3, 2009

The 40 Most Meaningful Things (permalink)

 
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Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
What comedy or farce is funnier than a distressful stomach?

Clue:  This is according to Roman satirist Juvenal.

Answer:  Nothing.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Sidney George Owen, Thirteen Satires of Juvenal (1903), p. 35.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
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A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
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June 2, 2009

Unicorns (permalink)
Here's Coral Silverman's reflective take on the famous Unicorn Tapestry.  (Via Phantasmaphile.)


"The Unicorn Sees Itself" by Coral Silverman.  See full size here.
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Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Which came first? The chicken, the egg, or the crossing of the road?
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Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
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June 1, 2009

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Freddie Prinze Jr. has been "five years in the Hollywood wilderness," according to IMDb.  Yes, we can confirm that Freddie's been tangled up on Vine, caught in Holly on Briarcliff, sniffing flowers on Orchid and Primrose, munching pods on Tamarind, and unable to see the Forest (Lawn) for the trees on Beachwood, Fernwood, Black Oak, Sycamore, Yucca, Live Oak, Lemon Grove, Red Oak, and Canyon Oak.  No one thought to look for Freddie on the grassy Knoll.
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Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"There ought to be a book which, if read, might turn into food.  But if we are starving we will have eaten before reading it."
Shuntaro Tanikawa, Giving People Poems, 2005, p. 7.
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A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.