CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.

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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
May 31, 2010

Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

May 30, 2010

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Q: Who sports better painted-on features: Vertigo's Kim Novak or Groucho Marx?
A: Groucho Marx ... though frankly Kim Novak looks more ridiculous.

P.S. May we humbly suggest that anyone who considers Hitchock's Vertigo a masterpiece hasn't seen enough films to posit an opinion.  Hey, don't shoot the messenger.


 
June writes:

Kim was in a terrible industrial accident involving black permanent markers.  Groucho painted his on on purpose. 
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


For Geof Huth.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

May 29, 2010

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

An associate was worried about an "unexpected big drop" in his Web traffic.  "Unexpected big drop?" I mused.  "That sounds like the perfect epitaph!"


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

May 28, 2010

Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)


“We’ll all be watching for your ship.” —William Drysdale

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: a gun or a knife?

Clue:  This is according to a guide to drawing comics

Answer:  A knife.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Suck School of Comic Art, Suck.com, (Nov. 7, 1997)
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

May 27, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin, who writes of "The parabolic light cast by a lamp.  Perhaps in a cave."

---

June writes:

I wish I were clever enough to draw a diagram of what illuminates Professor Oddfellow!

---

Prof. Oddfellow responds with a diagram:

> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

May 26, 2010

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

EMMA by Jane Austen

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her. Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Semicolon Moons (permalink)

FIRST QUARTER (PROGRESSIVE)

"A semicolon of twinkling starlight against a uniform background glow."

—Stephen James O'Meara, Steve O'Meara's Herschel 400 Observing Guide (2007)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .

May 25, 2010

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
Why I Have Never Left Portmeirion

(for Ken Smith, in the style of Emily Dickinson's
"I Never Saw a Moor," and hyperlinked to photos)

I never saw the port,
I never heard the sea;
Yet I waved down a flagstone boat
(an Atlas guided me).

A Golden Dragon's treasure:
the Buddha's missing hand;
A wild, Gwyllt-y pleasure:
the estuary sand.

The Watch House has no clocks,
The bell tower makes no sound;
Yet the humming of a Mermaid's rocks
has rendered me spellbound.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by Paul Dean.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

May 24, 2010

Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
Today's Question:

Was King Ludwig II of Bavaria declared insane just days before his mysterious death in 1886?

With hindpsych, the regrettable answer is "yes."  On the left side of our striking Tarot spread, the Moon card speaks of Ludwig's vivid imagination and his shadow self.  Indeed, Ludwig was famous for his moonlit excursions and night owl schedule.  His enemies would have used this card as evidence of chasing after fantasies (at best) and entertaining distorted thoughts.

In the central card, the hands of the lovers don't touch—Ludwig's connection to love isn't through physical union.  Rather, a higher ideal (the angel) governs a mountaintop in the clouds—home of Neuschwanstein castle.  This card would have reminded Ludwig's enemies of the king's failure to secure an alliance through marriage, not to mention the rumors of the king's homosexuality.

On the right, the young man of the Two of Pentacles skillfully juggles a couple of gold coins.  This of course symbolizes the king's playful nature as well as his confident investment in personal projects.  His enemies would have used this card as evidence of reckless spending—note the infinity symbol around the coins.

The moon faces left; the juggler of coins faces right; the lovers in the middle don't touch.  We see an unmistakable polarity in this spread of cards.  Is it evidence of a strong Anima/Animus personality or of mental instability?  Ludwig's enemies saw imbecilic dancing in the juggler and heard mad howling from the moonlit wolves.  They declared the king insane and deposed him in 1886.


* Historians must reconstruct the past out of hazy memory.  "Once upon a time" requires "second sight."  The "third eye" of intuition can break the "fourth wall" of conventional perspectives.  Instead of "pleading the fifth," historians can take advantage of the "sixth sense" and be in "seventh heaven."  All with the power of hindpsych, the "eighth wonder of the world."  It has been said that those who forget the past are condemned to repeat it.  Therein lies the importance of Tarot readings for antiquity.  When we confirm what has already occurred, we break the shackles of the past, freeing ourselves to chart new courses into the future.
> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .

May 23, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by surrealist J. Karl Bogartte.

---

Gary Barwin
suggests:

because the shadows are sheep
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which character from children’s literature is funnier: Stuart Little or Peter Churchmouse?

Clue:  This is according to The Journal of Educational Research

Answer:  Stuart Little  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  The Journal of Educational Research (1920), p. 518. 
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

May 22, 2010

Colorful Allusions (permalink)
Here's Jesse's spot-on Prof. Oddfellow impression!  And it's true: our dictionary of magic words looks best when viewed through novelty eyewear.  Thanks for putting the hologram back into grammar, Jesse!


> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
It seems a rare thing to encounter a source citation within song lyrics.  The first time we noticed the phenomenon was back in 1988, in They Might Be Giants' song "Ana Ng":

When I was driving once I saw this painted on a bridge:
"I don't want the world, I just want your half"
> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

May 21, 2010

Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
See our analysis of archetypes from a long time ago in the Star Wars series over at MysteryArts.com.
> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
In honor of Gordon Meyer's "Lost Windows" series, Prof. Oddfellow prepares to transit the back of beyond.


> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)


“The marina and launching ramps are waiting for your boat.” —Westways

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

May 20, 2010

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
If, as Robert Louis Stevenson said, "wine is bottled poetry," then Mint Juleps are georgics, vodka is blank verse, and a set of drinks is a roundelay.

---

Jonathan Caws-Elwitt posits:

And Irish whiskey is a limerick?

Prof. Oddfellow answers:

Yes!  And did you know that after a few shots it doubles as an anapestic?

June quips:

I thought tequila would be a lime-rick.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

May 19, 2010

Semicolon Moons (permalink)

FIRST QUARTER (FUTURE)

"The day is again punctuated."

—Tony Banham, Not the Slightest Chance (2003)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
What is the origin of the set of dots we use to indicate an omission from writing?

Prof. Oddfellow has traced the dots back to this unretouched mathematical illustration from 1918, showing how to construct an ellipse using circle arcs.  Note the three dots on the right side of the central line.  Our ellipsis dots are, fittingly, born of the ellipse!


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

May 18, 2010

Staring at the Sun (permalink)


The Campanile at Portmeirion, Wales.
> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


Ampersands (permalink)


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
True or False: Shakespeare’s “Prince Hal is less humorous than Falstaff.”

Clue:  This is according to a Shakespeare scholar.

Answer:  False.  “Prince Hal himself is no less humorous than Falstaff, while his wit has a dignity and a sarcastic edge not observable in the fat knight’s random and reckless sallies.”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Richard Grant White, Studies in Shakespeare (1885), p. 29.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

May 17, 2010

Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
See our guest post at BonnieCehovet.com about the intriguing Tarot archetypes found throughout Tom Stoppard's absurdist film Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.


The skull of poor Yorick, a Tarot archetype in the highly witty film Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.
> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .


The Right Word (permalink)

The Book of Jokes by Momus
From our Magic Words outpost at Blogger:

In his novel The Book of Jokes (2009), Momus' narrator lives in a preposterous world governed by the laws of bad jokes and dirty jokes. But the narrator has a revelation concerning the magic of words:
I have discovered that there is a way to escape this grim fate—the misfortune of joke dharma. The solution, I believe, is that I should assume, myself, the responsibility of telling the very jokes which constrain and define me, and to make, each time, a small alteration in their telling, an alteration which restores a few shreds of dignity, human decency, beauty and sensuality to the tale.

It might begin by embroidery; I add a few details which are not normally included in the rush to the punchline. I must ensure that the story is so well-told that my audience loses interest in the farcical pay-off, the money-shot. I tell the tale several times, from different angles and with different emphases, forcing my listeners to pay attention to small formal questions, adverbs rather than verbs, hows rather than whats.

By these methods, little by little, I believe I can improve my world. Even if you are not in the same grim situation as me, you might want to try this technique for yourself. (51-52)
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .

May 16, 2010

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
An Italian friend asked about the Franklin penny's motto, "Mind your business."

Q: Does the motto mean "Mind your [own] business" (as in "Mind your beeswax") or "Mind your business [affairs]"?

A. Both: it's a "doubloon entendre."


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q. And, after all, is not eating well what the culinary arts are all about?
A. Yes, it is.
Q. That was actually a rhetorical question. Aren't you supposed to be on break?

—humorist, playwright, neologist, palindromist, parodist, and wit Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .

May 15, 2010

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Our friend Jason disagrees with President Obama's chilling decree that information "becomes a distraction."  Indeed, Jason suggests that information ranks only fourth in terms of distraction:

1. Cleavage
2. House flies
3. Shiny objects
4. Information


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)


"There was more than one way into the Otherworld." —Lisa Tuttle, The Mysteries

Pictured above, Prof. Oddfellow knocks on a fairy door.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

May 14, 2010

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Butter doesn't discriminate." —inspired by the excellent film Visioneers


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)
“Now and again, perhaps, the heavens will fall, and your ship will come home laden with gold and silk and ruddy wine.” —Richard Middleton


 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

May 13, 2010

A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"There's a fine line between networking and not working." —June Conley
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: a crow’s cawing or blue jay’s squawking?

Clue:  This is according to Beat poet Allen Ginsberg

Answer:  Blue jay squawking  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Allen Ginsberg, Spontaneous Mind: Selected Interviews, 1958-1996 (2001), p. 373.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

May 12, 2010

Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
I was surprised to discover today that I was quoted in Wikipedia's "acoustic music" entry:

Writing for Splendid, music reviewer Craig Conley suggests, "When music is labeled acoustic, unplugged, or unwired, the assumption seems to be that other types of music are cluttered by technology and overproduction and therefore aren't as pure."
> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .


Semicolon Moons (permalink)

WAXING CRESCENT (PRESENT PERFECT)

"semicolon [;], star [*]"

Roget's International Thesaurus (1962)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

May 11, 2010

Puzzles and Games :: Tic Tac Toe Story Generator (permalink)
Our Tic Tac Toe generator builds stories out of the one-letter words X and O.  Here's an example, from a photo we spotted at the Frog Blog.  The letters can be translated as follows:

Stitching wonderment
Gladness crossing, multiplying
Round reassurance magnifying


INSTRUCTIONS:
In alternate turns, complete a row, column, or diagonal with three X’s or O’s. Each X and O has a discrete unit of meaning, as detailed in the Dictionary of One-Letter Words. Choose and write a letter meaning alongside each X and O placed in the grid; don’t repeat a letter meaning within the same game. Number each turn on the grid, to establish the linear progression of the story. When the game is finished, use the sequence of key words to construct your story, adding connecting phrases as necessary.

Click here for a printable template.  Thanks to Gary Barwin for inspiration!
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Tic Tac Toe Story Generator . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
What is funnier than laughing when you shouldn't be laughing?

Clue:  This is according to novelist Rick Hamilin.

Answer:  Nothing.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Rick Hamilin, Reading Between the Lines (2006), p. 111.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

May 10, 2010

Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

May 9, 2010

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
I looked for a punch line when I found a Lorem Ipsum generator with all sorts of language links at the top.  (See screenshot.)  Here's my own punch line in honor of Robert Heinlein:

I translated Lorem Ipsum into Martian, but it was all grok to me.


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)

Photo via.
"I was surprised anybody had answered my rhetorical question."
David Farris, Lie Still, 2004
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .

May 8, 2010

Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: French toast or pancakes?

Clue:  This is according to someone dissatisfied with his job at a marketing company.

Answer:  French toast.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  John Kowalik, “Being John Kowalik,” JohnKowalik.com (April 25, 2007)
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

May 7, 2010

Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)


“Expect more peace of mind that your ship will come in.” —Indianapolis Monthly

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .


Staring at the Sun (permalink)


Foggy morning in Durham, North Carolina.
> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .

May 6, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

May 5, 2010

Semicolon Moons (permalink)

WAXING CRESCENT

The semicolon appears to be partly but less than one-half illuminated by the reading lamp. The fraction of the semicolon's dot that is illuminated is increasing like a snowball that grows as it rolls. This semicolon appears before the First Quarter Semicolon and after the New Semicolon. The crescent will grow larger and larger every day, until the semicolon looks like the First Quarter Semicolon.


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"that there are no pre-conditions." —Golda Meir, International Documents on Palestine, 1974
> read more from On One Condition . . .

May 4, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by this piece by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"Someone needs to write a book on what constitutes hatred toward others."
Eric Penn, Children of Chaotics, 1995, p. 134.
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .

May 3, 2010

Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
What is funnier than unhappiness?

Clue:  This is according to playwright Samuel Beckett

Answer:  Nothing  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Simon Critchley, Very Little—Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature (2004), p. 184.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

May 2, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.
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Staring at the Sun (permalink)


Lloyd Wright's mountaintop memorial to Emanuel Swedenborg in Rancho Palos Verdes, California.
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May 1, 2010

The Right Word (permalink)
Dr. Awkward writes:

ok, i've been struggling with this for years - in high school english i learned that it's verboten to punctuate after a set of quotation marks, but following this rule seems rather jarring - looking for an elegant solution...

I'll share my secrets.  When quotation marks and punctuation become awkward, the most elegant solution is to paraphrase and avoid directly quoting.  Contrariwise, quote generously enough to offset and thereby avoid quotation marks altogether.  For example:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, dignissim libero.  Felis metus:

Magna mi id facilisi, est nostra, placerat amet sit, proin mollis commodo tincidunt lorem est, neque wisi vitae sed blandit. Sed tincidunt rem hendrerit cubilia fusce, pellentesque tincidunt tellus in. Ut ac metus curabitur eu. Nunc sollicitudin blandit sit consectetuer a non.

Quam posuere non sociosqu, id nec blandit sed nulla aliquam ut, diam id dolor ipsa habitasse. Et id hendrerit a ut, hendrerit erat ornare quisque donec odio platea.
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Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
Someone should write a book about the "little territorial struggles over semantics between retailer and consumer." —Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
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Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
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