CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
July 31, 2010

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS by Dr. Seuss

Every Who
Down in Who-ville
Liked Christmas a lot.
Suddenly a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

July 30, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Headlessness ~

Portrait from Autobiography of the Hon. Humphrey Howe Leavitt.

“Faceless and eyeless, formless, without bound?” —Robert Buchanan

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

THE AWAKENING by Kate Chopin

A green and yellow parrot, which hung in a cage outside the door, kept repeating over and over: "Suddenly, a shot rang out."
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

July 29, 2010

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
Prof. Oddfellow exits a door to nowhere at Portmeirion's colonnade.


> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
de rigueur mortis: when etiquette requires a stiff upper lip.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

July 28, 2010

Semicolon Moons (permalink)

FULL

The semicolon's illuminated side is facing the reader. The semicolon appears to be completely illuminated by the reading lamp. The lighted side of the semicolon faces the reader, still and proud, like a young goddess. This means that the reader, reading lamp, and semicolon are nearly in a straight line, with the reader in the middle. The semicolon that we see is very bright from the reading lamp reflecting off it.


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


The four chambers of the star are similar to the four quadrants of life, but they surround a degenerate helium core.

(Inspired by Gary Barwin.)
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

July 27, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Headlessness ~

Portrait from A Biography of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher.

“The head dissolved into the atmosphere while I watched it, there being no motion up or down.” —The Spiritual Magazine

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

A TALE OF TWO CITIES by Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which are funnier: monkeys or husbands?

Clue:  This is according to a lawyer

Answer:  Husbands  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Ralph Bushnell Potts, Come Now the Lawyers (1972), p. 174
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 26, 2010

Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands (permalink)
Some Dust Bunnies Shrugged Their Shoulders at Me Today
I wasn't even aware dust bunnies had shoulders.
Now I know.
But I should think they could find better use for them than sarcastic shrugging.
But then...have you ever met an unlackadaisical dust bunny?
William Keckler
> read more from Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands . . .

July 25, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
One of the most interesting themes in David Cronenberg's film adaptation of William Burrough's Naked Lunch: every act of creation murders the muse who inspired it.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

July 24, 2010

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

DADDY-LONG-LEGS by Jean Webster

The first Wednesday in every month was a Perfectly Awful Day—a day to be awaited with dread, endured with courage and forgotten with haste.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

July 23, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Headlessness ~

Portrait from A Memoir of Jacques Cartier.

"Uncertain whether a ghostly hand might not presently draw aside the curtain.” —Leith Adams

---

Antipater of Cydonia writes:

This suggests the Scanner Model of reality. That reality is a matter of faithful reproduction. Of what? I don't know. Most savvy people consider recreation a misnomer. Or a parlor trick. A museum. A diorama. A dilemmarama. That a copy of a copy of a copy gets less real. That's the Faith. That's the cherished human notion. Because of the lost substrate. But the other argument is that the copy of the copy of the copy is every bit as real as the original (arch-ecriture whatevah). It's memory which is fouling reality. Memory the copier. Memory  the bad copyist. The logical conclusion would seem to be that reality has nothing whatsoever to do with memory. Uh oh.


* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)


“One must be careful when an offshore breeze is blowing or your ship will come off the quay very quickly.” —Ships Monthly

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

July 22, 2010

Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
True of False: Hash is funnier than croquette.

Clue:  This is according to the book The Sense of Humor.

Answer:  True.  “Hash is immensely humorous, but a croquette is not.  Yet, what is a croquette but hash that has come to a head?”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Max Eastman, The Sense of Humor (1921), p. 150.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 21, 2010

Semicolon Moons (permalink)

FULL (PROGRESSIVE)

"Semicolon, or semi-lunar in shape."

—Thomas Wright Moir Cameron, The Parasites of Man in Temperate Climates (1960)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"Dinner and drinks on me." —Kathy Reichs, Grave Secrets, 2002
> read more from On One Condition . . .

July 20, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Headlessness ~

Portrait from A Memoir of John Deakin Heaton.

“He, without eyes, surveying material and spiritual worlds.” —The Common School Journal

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

METAMORPHOSIS by Franz Kafka

One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armour-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Puzzles and Games (permalink)
Turtles or Hurdles?

In each sentence, guess whether the blank traverses a "turtle" or a "hurdle."

1. "What a sight [those slow, lumbering snails] had been! Something like a slow ___."
Patricia Highsmith, Eleven, 1989, p. 772.

2. "Interestingly, the animals would occasionally leap over the ___."
—Christopher Peterson, et al., Learned Helplessness, 1995, p. 193.

3. "He jumped over the ___. Then he turned and ran across the roof as fast as he could."
—Paul Andrew Witty, Reading for Interest, 1955, p .114

Answer: 1. hurdle, 2. hurdle, 3. turtle (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)

(This puzzle is inspired by and dedicated to Jonathan-Caws Elwitt.)
> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .

July 19, 2010

Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by Gary Barwin.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

July 18, 2010

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

THE RAZOR'S EDGE by W. Somerset Maugham

I have never begun a novel with more misgiving.  Suddenly, a shot rings out.

[Thanks to June for the suggestion!]
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Gary Barwin asks:

I want to contract the word "don't" by leaving the appostrophe out.  Do I have to put it back in in order to take it out?

Here's our solution:


> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .

July 17, 2010

Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: comic actor W.C. Fields or the idea of W.C. Fields?

Clue:  This is according to journalist Wilfrid Sheed.

Answer:  the idea.  “I have always felt that the idea of Fields is funnier than Fields himself; that even the face and voice he has taught us to remember are not quite the real Fields.”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Wilfrid Sheed, The Good Word and Other Words (1978), p. 191.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 16, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Headlessness ~

Portrait from Biography of Rev. Leonidas L. Hamline.

“As if his high forehead touched cloud-land, and were obscured by dreams.” —Clemence Dane, Legend

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

July 15, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

July 14, 2010

Semicolon Moons (permalink)

FULL (FUTURE)

"The craters of the moon. Semicolon."

—W. W. Pasko, American Dictionary of Printing and Bookmaking (1894)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

July 13, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Headlessness ~

Portrait from Autobiography by Moncure Daniel Conway.

“A beheaded man wanders about a headless spectre in the World of Shades.” —Sir James George Frazer, The Golden Bough

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY by Oscar Wilde

The studio was filled with the rich odour of roses, and when the light summer wind stirred amidst the trees of the garden, there came through the open door the heavy scent of the lilac, or the more delicate perfume of the pink-flowering thorn.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
Happily ever after is so once upon a time.

(via Frog Blog)
> read more from The Right Word . . .

July 12, 2010

The Right Word (permalink)
Our artsy friend Rana Adams surprised us today with the ultimate in minimalism: bare bookshelves save for our Dictionary of One-Letter Words.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
“What kind of fish sings an opera?”  Which punch line is funnier: “halibut,” “mackeral,” or the real answer.

Clue:  This is from Neil Simon’s Broadway Bound

Answer:  Halibut.  “I guarantee you that a halibut is funnier than the real answer.  I mean, look at him.  Sitting there with a hat on.  If he put it on to be funny, it would be dumb.  But he doesn’t know he’s got it on, so it’s hysterical.”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Neil Simon, Broadway Bound (1987), p. 10.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 11, 2010

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Ironically, most people shout "Eureka" when they're not in Kansas anymore.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


FUN: a gleam in the eye, reflected in the faces of others.

This diagram was inspired by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt and Bernie DeKoven.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

July 10, 2010

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

RELATIVITY by Albert Einstein

In your schooldays most of you who read this book made acquaintance with the noble building of Euclid's geometry, and you remember—perhaps with more respect than love—the magnificent structure, on the lofty staircase of which you were chased about for uncounted hours by conscientious teachers.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

July 9, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ The Veil ~

Portrait from The Confessions of a Beachcomber.

Note that the fisherman’s ghostly spear pierces the veil to make contact with the material realm.

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)
“No one can guarantee that your ship will come in, but it can certainly help to have the guidance of an experienced crew.” —Mainstay Funds


 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

July 8, 2010

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


For Geof Huth.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

July 7, 2010

Semicolon Moons (permalink)

WAXING GIBBOUS (PRESENT PERFECT)

"The phases, the semicolon."

—Byung Chan Eu, Generalized Thermodynamics (2002)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
True or False: Arkansas is funnier than New York

Clue:  This is according to a book about Arkansas.

Answer:  False.  “I certainly don’t see anything about Arkansas that is funnier than New York or Iowa or Indiana, and nothing even approaching Southern California.”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Clyde Brion Davis, The Arkansas (1940), p. 299.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 6, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ The Veil ~

Portrait from An Autobiography by John Bartholomew Gough.

“Dark and heavy may the veil of Death have hung before us.” —S. Longfellow

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

THE ART OF WAR by Sun Tzu

The art of war is of vital importance to
the State.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .

July 5, 2010

Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: the number 042 or the number 359?

Clue: This is according to Douglas Adams.

Answer: The number 359. "Incidentally, Douglas' aside that 359 is the funniest three-digit number turns out to be an example of his fixation with telephone numbers, which crop up frequently in the Hitchkhiker's Guide saga: 359 was the dialling code for his home in Islington.” (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)

Citation: M.J. Simpson, Hitchhiker: A Biography of Douglas Adams (2003), p. xix.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 4, 2010

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Christopher
Patron Saint of Time Travelers


Art by lisby.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: a cluck or a quack?

Clue: This is according to cartoonist Matthew Diffee

Answer: A quack. Diffee also notes that "waddle" sounds as silly as it looks. (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)

Citation: Mark Caro, The Foie Gras Wars (2009), p. 164
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 3, 2010

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS by Kenneth Grahame

The Mole had been working very hard all the morning, spring-cleaning his little home.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

July 2, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ The Veil ~

Portrait from Memoir of Rev. Samuel B. McPheeters.

"Though this specter’s face is never seen, he is recognized.” —Mark Moran, Weird Hauntings

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)
“Your boat shall be down early on Sunday morning next.” —James Clifton


 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: really big or really small?

Clue:  This is according to a guide to drawing comics

Answer:  Really big.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Suck School of Comic Art, Suck.com, (Nov. 7, 1997)
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 1, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

Inspired by Myrlin A Hermes, The Lunatic, the Lover, and the Poet


> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .



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