CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
September 30, 2010

Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which Shakespeare play is funnier: Hamlet or A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Clue:  This is according to a user’s guide to Hamlet

Answer:  A Midsummer Night’s Dream  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Michael Pennington, Hamlet: A User’s Guide (1997), p. 18.
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

September 29, 2010

Staring at the Sun (permalink)
At Portmeirion, Hercules (as Atlas) carries the weight of the world and the Sun.


> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


Semicolon Moons (permalink)

LAST QUARTER (CONTINUOUS)

"Eventide — An indefinite period."

—Thomas B Neely, The Illustrative Lesson Notes (1894)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .

September 28, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Mysterious Beards ~

Portrait from Life of Abraham Lincoln.

“The initial appearance of form is nothing more or less than the appearance of a shadowy quality or a gray splotch.” —The American Journal of Psychology

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA by Friedrich Nietzsche

When Zarathustra was thirty years old, he left his home and the lake of his home, and went into the mountains. There he enjoyed his spirit and solitude, and for ten years did not weary of it. But at last his heart changed,—and rising one morning with the rosy dawn, he went before the sun.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .

September 27, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .

September 26, 2010

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The immortal Charles Fort likens Big Science to a vacant-minded larva that spins its suffocating web over any non-conventional ideas:

Opposing us is the more or less well-established conventional doctrine that has spun like a cocoon around mind upon this earth, shutting off research, and stifling even speculation, shelling away all data of relations and relatability with external existences, a doctrine that, in its various explanations and disregards and denials, is unified in one expression of Exclusionism.  —New Lands
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"You must promise me a favour in return." —C. N. Williamson, "The Adventure of Monica," 1905
> read more from On One Condition . . .

September 25, 2010

Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
True or False: Flow charts are the funniest charts of all.

Clue:  This is according to a guide to drawing comics

Answer:  True.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Suck School of Comic Art, Suck.com, (Nov. 7, 1997)
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

September 24, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Mysterious Beards ~

Portrait from Bayard Taylor.

“I fancied I saw a pale blue misty outline of a human figure, but an outline so indistinct that I could only distrust my own vision.” —Lord Edward Bulwer-Lytton

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)
“Your boat must be three quarters of a mile away.” —Herbert Warren Wind


 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

September 23, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

September 22, 2010

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

This item was wholly inspired by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt, in reference to Cynthia Ozick's amazing blurb for Frederic Tuten's Self Portraits: Fictions: "An amazing, glittering, glowing, Proustian, Conradian, Borgesian, diamond-faceted, language-studded, myth-drowned dream!"


Barely Able writes:

I loved this blurb flow chart. It reminds me of the paint swatches at WAL-MART, which are probably the most perfect thing in the store. Which makes me want to destroy them. Or rearrange their perfect order. This is a Luciferian impulse. Did Lucifer really want to destroy? Or did he want to merely re-arrange. En tout cas, it's clear that re-arrangement is a damnable offense. A primordial offense. Perhaps the Ur-Offense. What is literary criticism but an attempt to rearrange artistic works in an imaginary space. It's hilarious. The books stay right where they are put. But if the re-arranger is particularly successful he might have certain books banned or sent to book gulags (thrift stores or worse). In which case, the books find it hard to reproduce. And then they may go extinct. So, overall, I think God is right. He should destroy Satan for being the Great Interior Decorator that he so clearly is. Satan is all about fussiness. There is no sin that does not first begin in fussiness.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Staring at the Sun (permalink)
Above, Mike is caught staring at the sunset over Moel y Gest mountain in Wales.
Below, the photo Mike took.



> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


Semicolon Moons (permalink)

LAST QUARTER

One-half of the semicolon appears to be illuminated by the reading lamp. The fraction of the semicolon's dot that is illuminated is decreasing, like the sound of waves during low tide. This semicolon is sometimes called Third Quarter. The left half of the semicolon appears lighted, and the right side appears dark. During the time between the Full Semicolon and the Last Quarter Semicolon, the part of the semicolon that appears lighted gets smaller and smaller every day, like a healing wound. It will continue to shrink until the New Semicolon.


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .

September 21, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Mysterious Beards ~

Portrait from Autobiography of Andrew T. Still.

“[A] mysterious beard, and strangely pleading, haunting eyes.” —O. Henry, “The Thing’s the Play”

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

WALDEN by Henry David Thoreau

When I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. I lived there two years and two months. At present I am a sojourner in civilized life again. Suddenly, a shot rings out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .

September 20, 2010

Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which word is funnier: car or Buick?

Clue:  This is according to the book Drawing on the Funny Side of the Brain

Answer:  Buick, as it is “funny sounding and more specific.”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Christopher Hart, Drawing on the Funny Side of the Brain (1998), p. 107
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

September 19, 2010

The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Jonathan Caws-Elwitt adds:

j. An axon and dendrite dressed up as a German sentence for Halloween.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
A vegetarian invited to dinner at a Biergarten: "I'm prepared for the wurst."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

September 18, 2010

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

BUDDHA by Karen Armstrong

One night toward the end of the sixth century B.C.E., a young man called Siddhatta Gotama walked out of his comfortable home in Kapilavatthu in the foothills of the Himalayas and took to the road.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.

[Thanks to June for suggesting this send-up of the old saying, "If you see the Buddha on the road, kill him."]
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

September 17, 2010

The Right Word (permalink)
"Remove yourself from the word. Depend on the letter, depend on the phoneme. It is the particles that matter. Particulate." —Geof Huth
> read more from The Right Word . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Mysterious Beards ~

Portrait from Autobiography of Enrico Morozzo della Rocca.

“Nebulous and gruesome shreds of blue-fog like wraiths.” —Frederick Albert Cook

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)


“Keep a tight lid on the boat, and your ship will come in.” —James Van Pelt

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

September 16, 2010

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

"Science is a turtle that says that its own shell encloses all things." —Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

September 15, 2010

Semicolon Moons (permalink)

LAST QUARTER (PROGRESSIVE)

"The period of moonlight falls in the first part of the night."

—Alfred Reginald Radcliffe-Brown, The Andaman Islanders (1948)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which word is funnier: fat or bloated?

Clue:  This is according to the book Drawing on the Funny Side of the Brain

Answer:  Bloated, as it is “slightly gross.”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Christopher Hart, Drawing on the Funny Side of the Brain (1998), p. 107
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

September 14, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Mysterious Beards ~

Portrait from A Memoir of Randolph Sailer.

“What does the well-dressed ghost wear under his sheet?” —Marilyn Redmond

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

WUTHERING HEIGHTS by Emily Brontë

I have just returned from a visit to my landlord—the solitary neighbour that I shall be troubled with.  This is certainly a beautiful country!  In all England, I do not believe that I could have fixed on a situation so completely removed from the stir of society.  A perfect misanthropist’s heaven: and Mr. Heathcliff and I are such a suitable pair to divide the desolation between us.  A capital fellow!  He little imagined how my heart warmed towards him when I beheld his black eyes withdraw so suspiciously under their brows, as I rode up, and when his fingers sheltered themselves, with a jealous resolution, still further in his waistcoat, as I announced my name. Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .

September 13, 2010

Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
Linear time reversed itself as the Belgian new wave band Neon Judgement remastered their first two cassettes and released them on vinyl LPs.  Why they skipped 8-tracks along the way to vinyl, we'll never know, but we're eagerly awaiting a cylinder phonograph release, presumably available in time for holiday shopping.


> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
Prof. Oddfellow experiences a brainstorm below Portmeirion's folly lighthouse as the sun sets behind Moel y Gest mountain.

My head, like the sun, contained nothing except lucid flame,
and the message came from the sun to me without words.
Lois Phillips Hudson, Reapers of the Dust


> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .

September 12, 2010

Uncharted Territories (permalink)
"To penetrate as far as possible into the great white area on Dawson's map, south of the Kananaskis Lakes, marked with the magic word 'Unexplored,' that most fascinating and suggestive of all names to any lover of the wilderness."
Canadian Alpine Journal


Photo by drain.
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
miasma: a suffocating cloud over Miami
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

September 11, 2010

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

"Every science is a mutilated octopus.  If its tentacles were not clipped to stumps, it would feel its way into disturbing contacts.  To a believer, the effect of the contemplation of a science is of being in the presence of the good, the true, and the beautiful.  But what he is awed by is Mutilation.  To our crippled intellects, only the maimed is what what we call understandable, because the unclipped ramifies away into all other things."
—Charles Fort (Wild Talents), on every science's propensity to dismiss anything that doesn't fit its dogma
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

September 10, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Mysterious Beards ~

Portrait from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

“I am acquainted with a ‘seeing medium,’ who has seen the beard-atmosphere.” —George Cruikshank, A Discovery Concerning Ghosts

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)


“Your ship will come back to you laden with all the precious, divine gifts.” —Annalee Skarin

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
True or False: Monkeys are always funny, and amoebas are not funny unless they talk.

Clue:  This is according to a guide to drawing comics

Answer:  True.  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Suck School of Comic Art, Suck.com, (Nov. 7, 1997)
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

September 9, 2010

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
Our 14th great-grandmother, Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke, has many distinctions, not the least of which is her likelihood of having written the Shakespeare plays and sonnets.  (For compelling evidence, see Sweet Swan of Avon: Did a Woman Write Shakespeare?)  In this photo, we embrace our literary heritage.  The purple shirt and magic wand are in honor of the Irish branch of the family, which traces back to mytho-historical High Kings and fairy folk.


---

E West writes:

Love the shirt!

That's a wand? Quite wonderful!

A Riverside Shakespeare? Are you near the Charles River?

"Sweet Swan of Avon: did a woman write Shakespeare?"  -- oh, very sweet, indeed! Bravo!

---

Prof. Oddfellow writes:

Thank you!  The purple shirt reflects the hefty responsibility that comes with owning one’s exalted heritage.  When one's ancestors are of royal and/or magical origin, some rather profound questions and challenges suggest themselves.  To what crown(ing glory) is one the natural successor?  To what dignities?  What traditions are one's responsibility to keep alive?  What untapped powers?  If one's Weltanschauung does not account for an Otherworld, how can one reconcile one's nymph-glands?  ;-)

The Riverside Shakespeare was my favorite text from graduate school.  (It's the book I referenced while composing this rarefied research.)  I'm not near the Charles River, though I understand it's quite lovely.

> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"If somebody should like to write a book, but is like millions of persons who would like to write books, but fortunately don't know just what to write books about, I suggest a study of scares, with the idea of showing that they were not altogether hysteria and mass psychology, and that there may have been something to be scared about."
—Charles Fort, Wild Talents (1932)
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

September 8, 2010

A Fine Line Between... (permalink)


"The line between art and entertainment is, of course, a porous one." —HBG2's Long-Forgotten blog
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


Semicolon Moons (permalink)

LAST QUARTER (FUTURE)

"As if to punctuate the point, divine shafts of moonlight stream down."

—Mark I. Pinsky, The Gospel According to Disney (2004)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

This bright and cheerful September afternoon, with the strong greens and browns all around him and the ethereal, gentle misted tones of blue verging into violet in the distance.

—Hermann Hesse, The Glass Bead Game, translated by Richard and Clara Winston

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

September 7, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Mysterious Beards ~

Portrait of Alfred Lord Tennyson.

“Without wanting to draw overmuch on the Freudian trope of ghosts and the uncanny here, one can nonetheless add Tennyson’s ghost to all the others.” —Thomas Hardy

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

September 6, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


For Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the puzzle image below to reveal one possible solution.

You Do the Math - Presumptive Conundrums
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .

September 5, 2010

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
Charles Fort explains his eerily marvelous theory that ours is a ghostly realm—that when spirits die they become human beings:

My suspicion is that we've got everything reversed; or that all things that have the sanction of scientists, or that are in agreement with their myths, are ghosts: and that things called 'ghosts,' are, because they are not in agreement with the spooks of science, the more nearly real things.  I now suspect that the spiritualists are reversedly right—that there is a ghost-world—but that it is our existence—that when spirits die they become human beings.

I now have a theory that once upon a time, we were real and alive, but departed into this state that we call 'existence'—that we have carried over with us from the real existence, from which we died, the ideas of Truth, and of axioms and principles and generalizations—ideas that really meant something when we were really alive, but that, of course, now, in our phantom-existence—which is demonstrable by any X-ray photograph of any of us—can have only phantom-meaning—so then our never-ending, but always frustrated, search for our lost reality.  We come up chimera and mystification, but persistently have beliefs, as retentions from an experience in which there were things to believe in.  I'd not say that all of us are directly ghosts: most of us may be the descendants of the departed from a real existence, who, in our spook-world, pseudo-propagated.  (Wild Talents, 1932)
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
What’s funnier than death?

Clue:  This is according to a novel entitled A Stranger in My Grave

Answer:  Nothing.  “There's nothing funnier than death, really, especially if you have an advanced sense of humor.”  (The answer is in black text on the black background.  Highlight it to view.)

Citation:  Margaret Millar, A Stranger in My Grave (1960), p. 11
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

September 4, 2010

The Right Word (permalink)
Do blurbs sell books?  With a blurb like this one, how could Prof. Oddfellow refuse?

"An amazing, glittering, glowing, Proustian, Conradian, Borgesian, diamond-faceted, language-studded, myth-drowned dream!" —Cynthia Ozick, describing this book

(That's Prof. Oddfellow's catnip mouse enjoying the Swiss cheese on the dust jacket.  Thanks in a roundabout way to Hilary's mom for the tip!)


> read more from The Right Word . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Every conversation is a conflict of missionaries, each trying to convert the other, to assimilate, or to make the other similar to himself.  If no progress be made, mutual repulsion will follow."
—Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

 
* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

September 3, 2010

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Mysterious Beards ~

Portrait from the Martin B. Anderson biography.

“I have come across only four references to the beard of an apparition in the Census collection.” —J. G. Piddington, Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)


“Your ship will come in! We’ll celebrate tonight.” —Edward Michel-Bird

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

September 2, 2010

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
We're honored to have captured the spirit of Brentwood for DGuides' resource on the greater Los Angeles area.  Our photo shows the hilltop Getty Museum from the Angeleno Hotel.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by William Keckler.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

September 1, 2010

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

GREAT EXPECTATIONS by Charles Dickens

My father's family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip. Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Semicolon Moons (permalink)

WANING GIBBOUS (PRESENT PERFECT)

"The moonlight punctuating the wave crests."

—Maxine Masterfield, Painting the Spirit of Nature (1996)


 
Inspired by Gary Barwin.
> read more from Semicolon Moons . . .



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