CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.

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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
October 31, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Witchy illustrations from Harper's magazine, 1859 and 1860.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
And the song that you sing
Will speak louder than you
But always in a different language
—Kurt Harlan of Information Society, "The Sky Away"
> read more from The Right Word . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
We love books that take a running start on the excitement. Notice how the period on the half-title page transforms into an exclamation point on the title page. And the narrative hasn't technically begun!




 


> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

October 30, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1878 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "A brocken witch."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"I have to remember each time I get poked that the rose is a rose is a rose, no matter how much those thorns hurt."
Stuart Gustafson, Parables for Life in the 21st Century
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but some people develop ringworm from . . . of all places . . . the soil."
Brian Salt, Hidden Secrets to Curing Ringworm
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

October 29, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1863 issue of Harper's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"This advice bears repeating.  Yes, look up the words you can't spell as you write and those you don't understand as you read."
William Brohaugh, Write Tight
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple.  All you have to do is to rearrange your present financial life slightly and the money question will take care of itself.”

Popular Science (Feb. 1929)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

October 28, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "From out of the dusk of the wall."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
We discovered this curious "ghost in a candle" trick in an issue of The Strand from 1895.


Here's the explanation of the trick candle, "invented by a man as a rather peculiar surprise for a friend. He made that friend a present of some coloured wax candles, one of which contained the affair shown. The receiver was very fond of having a few candles of the coloured kind placed about his drawing-room, in candelabra, and was intensely surprised one night when one of those which he had thankfully accepted from his friend exploded with a loud 'bang,' after having burnt down about half-way, and revealed to view a miniature ghost, with outstretched arms, which had issued from the remaining portion of the candle. To say that the man was puzzled by so extraordinary an apparition is to incompletely describe his feelings. I wonder how the reader would accept such a crisis. I know that I should have been very much astonished. Yet the effect was produced in an exceedingly simple manner, as can be understood by examining the drawings. The lower half of the candle really consisted of a thin cardboard case, containing a spring and a small 'ghost' with spring-arms, which would fly apart immediately upon being released from their bondage. A small portion of gunpowder, separated by a disc of paper from the head of the 'ghost,' completed the apparatus. The outside of the cylinder was waxed to appear as but the continuation of the candle. When the flame burnt to the powder it naturally caused it to explode, and simultaneously with the discharge the spring forced the little image upwards. This device would make an effective toy, I am inclined to think, as the cylinder could be used as often as required, by fixing a half-candle properly to the top of it and concealing the join."
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but you don't strike me as the homebody type."
Rachel Kramer Bussel, Yes, Ma'am
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Unsubstantiated Insubstantiality ~

Title page from A Biography of François Magendie.

“A dark side without a shadow in the open air.” —The Works of John Ruskin

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

October 27, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)
The Shakespeare Papers dedicated an entire issue to one-letter words, and here's one of the pages we contributed.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Free speech is the whole thing, the whole ball game.  Free speech is life itself."
Salman Rushdie
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

October 26, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1860 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "I told you so."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


"The book gobbles us up immediately with its little fly-legs."
—Raymond Queneau


Therefore, a flyleaf:


> read more from The Right Word . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"The surprising truth is that although many machines, from household appliances to factory robots, perform functions seemingly unrelated to the date, they actually contain a hidden date calendar."
William D. McGuire50 Urgent Things You Need to Do Before the Millennium (1999)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

October 25, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Before his mind could grasp the picture it was gone."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"Every literary text is literary because of an indefinite quantity of potential meanings."
—Jean Lescure, "Brief History of the Oulipo"
> read more from The Right Word . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Unsubstantiated Insubstantiality ~

Portrait from the biography of Hugh McAllister Beaver.

She “could barely make out his face in the gray haze.” —Kathleen O’Neal Gear & W. Michael Gear, The Summoning God

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

October 24, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1908 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "You're making an absurd fuss about a golliwog."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"Sometimes I go for weeks without encountering 'a rose is a rose is a rose' but today—twice!  Small world."
Frank Muir & Denis Norden, The Utterly Ultimate "My Word!" Collection
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"Call it a hunch, call it plot expediency, call it what you will."
John William See, The Lady Cries Murder (1983), as if describing the scripting of Young Frankenstein


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .

October 23, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of The Strand magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"that we do not automatically subsume all of the realities that we label 'individual memory' under the name of 'collective memory.'" —Jeffrey K. Olick, et al., The Collective Memory Reader (2011)
> read more from On One Condition . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"He observed apropos of nothing that there was no way you could make people love one another."
Louis Begley, Matters of Honor
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .

October 22, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1866 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Let dogs delight."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"The ancient Celtic tale of the dog Gelert is one that bears repeating."
Suzanne Clothier, Bones Would Rain from the Sky
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  we don’t.”

Peter E. Earl, Economics as an Art of Thought (2000)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

October 21, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Dave closed his hand firmly upon hers, locking her arms around the neck of the gilt griffin."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Look, I hope you don't take this the wrong way but . . . I don't know exactly why, but I feel I can talk to you."
Elliot Perlman, Seven Types of Ambiguity
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Unsubstantiated Insubstantiality ~

Portrait from Memoir of Rev. Joseph Badger.

“The figure was ghostly pale, with indistinct features.” —Mark Alan Morris, The Ghost Next Door

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

October 20, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
The Shakespeare Papers dedicated an entire issue to one-letter words, and here's one of the pages we contributed.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"[People] may project their anger onto you and accuse you of being angry with them.  This may surprise you, particularly if you are in a pleasant mood." —Glendon Moriarty, Pastoral Care of Depression
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

October 19, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Pall Mall magazine.

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
There's only one rule:

• there are no rules (if you're stretching your imagination) —David Goss, The Science of Living Better Forever

• step on a crack , break your mother's back (if you're playing a sidewalk game)

• have the teapot in front of you at all times (if you're crocheting tea cosies) —Loani Prior, Really Wild Tea Cosies

• no deep-fried foods (if you're throwing a party and watching your cholesterol) —Mary Mihaly, The Complete Guide to Lowering Your Cholesterol

• there's no being tired (if you're touring Paris) —Penelope Rowlands, Paris Was Ours

• say "Thank you" (if you're receiving a compliment) —Thriving in the Workplace All-in-One For Dummies

• the teddy bear stays in the house (if you're a dog in training) —Heavenly Humor for the Dog Lover's Soul

• never, ever let a boy touch you there unless he's your husbandGillian Flynn, Dark Places

• wear whatever is most comfortable (if you're hiking with a dog) —Dan Nelson, Best Hikes with Dogs Western Washington

• never miss paying your round (if you're drinking with friends) —Jack Kahane, Memoirs of a Booklegger

• there must be at least one [item] on the list that is impossible (if you're setting goals) —David Taylor, The Naked Millionaire

• anything goes, as long as you keep at least two tires on the pavement (if you're driving an automobile) —Glenn Beck, The Overton Window

• conquer at any price (if you're on the battlefield) —Luis M. Rocha, The Holy Bullet

• yes means yes and no means no (in the sexual marketplace) —Glenn T. Stanton, Secure Daughters, Confident Sons

• never get involved with a student (if you're a good teacher) —Hank Brooks, The Inlet

• if you represent the wife, get as much as possible; if you represent the husband, give away as little as possible (in divorce settlement) —Howard K. Irving, Children Come First

• form, structure and content should not be separate (in synaesthetic cinema)Simon Rycroft, Swinging City

• don't eat from the tree of knowledge of good and evil (if you're in the Garden of Eden)

• you need one equation for every unknown (in algebra) —Norman S. Pratt, Pearls for the Moment

• don't hit the ducks (in a joke about a golf course in heaven) —Stephen Motway, Jokes, Quotes, and Other Assorted Things

• the fewer attachments and aversions you have to the goal, the quicker it will manifest (if you're a non-dualistic self-inquirer) —Aleksander Kupisz, Holistic Creation and Focus Zone Chi Gong

• no touching of the net (if you're a volley ball player) —Joseph A Bulko, Wall of Illusion, Book 3

• you clean up after yourself down there (if you're in the kitchen) —Jennifer Taylor Wojcik, From Day One

• learn to listen (if you're training to be a good communicator) —John Mason, Believe You Can
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"Call it a hunch, call it experience, call it a biased analysis by a lovesick dummy, but something didn't compute."
Barry T. Hawkins, There Are Smiles That Make Us Blue (2003)


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .

October 18, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1913 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "His confidence would have gone to pieces in uncomprehended terror had he known that the man, with a pair of powerful glasses to his eyes, was studying him minutely."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty is that there will be a rational solution."
Mark A. Bedau & Carol E. Cleland, The Nature of Life
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from James Speed.

“The contours of the dark things around me are sharpening, faint features beginning to emerge.” —Eric Stone, Grave Imports

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

October 17, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Strand magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"I couldn't think of what to write next.  I just ripped up the card."
Michael Lee West, Crazy Ladies (2000)


This frame is from the exquisitely charming Mapp & Lucia series, based on E. F. Benson's novels.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"Apropos of nothing (but taste implies a philosophy of nothing) . . ." —Marshall Blonsky, On Signs (1985)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .

October 16, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1893 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Girls refusing to marry."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"In literary terms, 'a rose is a rose is a rose,' is what it is: a rose.  It is the opposite of a trope."
Michael Rizzo, The Art Direction Handbook for Film
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


The Right Word (permalink)


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from The Right Word . . .

October 15, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1863 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"The central question bears repeating: why do we fear our own and others' foolishness and incompetence more than we fear other, arguably more fearful states?"
Ana Wandless, SB 4: Texas Charter Schools and the Politics of Competence
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  $10000.”

Edward J. McMillan, Not-for-Profit Budgeting and Financial Management (2003)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

October 14, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Confirmed writers of bad poetry."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Please don't take this the wrong way.  I'm not saying you shouldn't feel hurt or betrayed or angry.  But I want you to recognize that you've lost nothing here."
Diane Chamberlain, Secret Lives
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of Thomas Handasyd Perkins.

“The play of light and shadows turned his craggy face into an eerie visage.” —Lori Foster

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

October 13, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1884 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "'Look!' she whispered.  'Do you see it?  There!'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
What a confetti that summer was, spent snipping invented words in Shakespeare.  Occam's razor was at hand for painstakingly isolating those simplest inventions, the elegantly minimalist one-letter words.  Hawthorne may have his scarlet letter, but Shakespeare's coinages are pure gold.  The poet Geof Huth suggests that tiny expressions both surprise and justify, making /ourselves/ vessels of concentration, inviting us to accept the mantle of makers of meaning.  Thus attending to precision, "we become whom we are asked to become" (Geof Huth, "in tininess, we," June 22, 2009).

The Shakespeare Papers dedicated an entire issue to one-letter words, and here's one of the pages we contributed.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but the easiest terminations are those involving immorality, financial mismanagement, or gross insubordination."
Jeff Iorg, The Painful Side of Leadership: Moving Forward Even When It Hurts (2009)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

October 12, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "We quietly dropped the dummy overboard."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Anything's possible after five years in Europe."
José Donoso, The Obscene Bird of Night
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"that you give me my money first." —Sam Mphuthi, Coming Back Home
> read more from On One Condition . . .

October 11, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from an 1891 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "The woman tried to pierce the darkness."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"How could one decide to become part of a world whose loftiest truths are determined by a dish of marinated eels?"
José Donoso, The Obscene Bird of Night
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Life of Thomas Jefferson.

“It was an unmistakable face, and of itself answered many questions.” —Alfred Elton Van Vogt

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

October 10, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "'Call it black art or what you will,' said Holdsworth, gravely."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
"Everything visible is made of gold."
Robert Desnos, Liberty or Love!
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

October 9, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"When you arrive at the structure, begin examining the structure from the top."
Electrical Transmission in a New Age (2002)


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "He sat gazing into the flames."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"A rose is a rose all times of the year."
—Lizette Woodworth Reese, "A December Rose," A Handful of Lavender (1891)
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
"Is it the dead who bring our memories back to life when they want us to feel their presence?  Do they cross the stream of time to reach us by turning back the clock within us?"
—Gustav Meyrink, The White Dominican
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .

October 8, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1864 issue of Harper's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"Forgive me for my repetition, but it bears repeating.  Although you're not the one it bears repeating to.  Could you please go tell the ones who need to hear?"
Marianne Stevens, Mary: A Love Story
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple and that is: ‘interrogate a suspect in a scientific and psychological way.’”

Neela Mukherjee, Learning to Share (1997)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

October 7, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Courtesy of literary rapscallion Jonathan Caws-Elwitt:

If hiding in plain sight is a time-honored effective strategy, hiding in plain sight in bright colors can only be that much more effective.


Photo by Only Alice.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way ... but tonight has sort of thrown me for a loop and I'm wiped."
Sydney Somers, Don't Let Go
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from The Life of William Pinkney.

“With such ghostly features, what on Earth can you focus on?” —Martin Mobberley

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

October 6, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1886 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "Shakspere in the shoe store. Clerk,  who has played Hamlet:  '2B or not 2B—that is the question.'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)

From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You feel ordinary.  This may surprise you, but people who accomplish extraordinary things possess nothing more extraordinary than you do."
Mary Manin Morrissey, Building Your Field of Dreams (1997)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

October 5, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Don't kiss me."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
"On the wall [. . .] faded pictures of saints blessed the expired time of old calendars and the clock's single hand."
José Donoso, The Obscene Bird of Night
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Ask any person to tell you what missing teeth are — "real," everyday missing teeth, not the abstract extractions of theoretical dentistry — and he will likely elaborate upon abscessed absences, silver-filled nonentities, cavitied nothingnesses, fairy chattel.  How can it be that a baby's toothless smile is contagious?  Can a toothless smiler be preoccupied?

[Apologies to philosopher Roberto Casati.]

Dedicated to Gary Barwin.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

October 4, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Still it is undeniable that behind all science and mysticism, behind all the approaches of West and East, there is but one area of reality and realization: the human psyche. Whatever preternatural realities might make themselves known to us, they must do so by way of the psyche or else go unnoticed." —Stephan A. Hoeller, "Wise Men from the East"
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "'You won't know till afterward,' it said.  'You won't know till long, long afterward.'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)


> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from My Autobiography and Reminiscences by William Powell Frith.

“From out of regions dark a spectral form appeared!” —Reuben Vose

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

October 3, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
In case of emergency, break glass.


Thanks, Mike!
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "The sign of the devil."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Shouldn't we be speaking of something more important than life and death?"
—Gustav Meyrink, The Angel of the West Window
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

October 2, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "The parrot had over-eaten itself on the bonnet of the lady superior."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)


A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"With all due respect to Gertrude Stein, a rose is not a rose is not a rose."
Ellen J. Langer, On Becoming an Artist
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

October 1, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1861 issue of Harper's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating: in our choosing we not only affect the world around us, but we also change ourselves."
Keith A. Fournier & Lela Gilbert, The Prayer of Mary
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple.  Power.”

InfoWorld (Feb. 23, 1987)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.