CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
December 31, 2011

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Ludgate Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "The with furious force he flung it down."


Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1868 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads simply: "The Tiger."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  where there is a market, there will be a product to fill it.”

Terence Dickinson, NightWatch (1998)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

December 30, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1853 issue of Graham's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 edition of Vaught's Practical Character Reader.  The headline reads: "The center of mental concentration."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"That you don't run off." —Heidi Rice, Unfinished Business with the Duke
> read more from On One Condition . . .

December 29, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Ludgate Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "Look!  He has no shadow!"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "I stood up and met the hot summons of the rising sun, hurrying toward me, as it were, with glad tidings, over the spikes of barley."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"'Demons don't cry,' she remarked, apropos of nothing.' Neither do gargoyles.'"
Piers Anthony, Geis of the Gargoyl
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .

December 28, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)
"A writer's job is to lie.  A reader's job is to be deceived." –Geof Huth
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Leaping into the air so as to insulate himself from the floor."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating that touch should not be overdone, because touch can have a negative effect."
Mark Stephen Schwartz, Biofeedback
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

December 27, 2011

Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
A snowman illustration from a 1902 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "They levelled the bass fiddle like a battering-ram."


*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .


The Right Word (permalink)


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"'Call it a hunch.'  He stood frozen in the doorway as if he couldn't decide, or as if part of him wanted to and part of him didn't."
Laurell K. Hamilton, Blood Noir (2008), as if describing the plot of Young Frankenstein


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .

December 26, 2011

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
Here's a charming moment from Genevieve (1953), dedicated to literary scalawag Jonathan Caws-Elwitt (who intoxicates us with the exuberance of his own velocity):


> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "The big dynamo drew him to itself irresistibly."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but serve is the least important aspect of table tennis."
Boys' Life, Jan. 1966
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

December 25, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Put the asterisk in ※-mas!

(Thanks, Mike!)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1888 issue of Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours magazine.  The caption reads: "The embalmed head.—'At the window sat a man.  It was the attitude of a man in deep thought: but he had no head."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1884 issue of London Society Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "What I saw after eating my Christmas pudding."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"A rose is a rose is a rose — or so they say."
Orient Express Magazine
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

December 24, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Santa Claus is depicted as a young wood nymph in this illustration from an 1891 issue of The Strand magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It is true, and bears repeating, that money isn't everything."
Third Way, Oct. 2004
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  it depends.”

Bill Gallagher, Guerrilla Selling (1992)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

December 23, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1891 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "The children threw their marbles at the beauty."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"To be honest—and don't take this the wrong way—but I was only going to make up a fantasy so you'd tell me yours."
J.J. Murray, I'm Your Girl
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .

December 22, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Beyond the End": an illustration from an 1890 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "He stood looking out into the night."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"The surprising truth is that hypothermia can strike even in relatively warm tropical waters."
Karen BergerScuba Diving: A Trailside Guide (2000)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

December 21, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1899 issue of English Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "We looked up and perceived that it issued from the ceiling."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The babe in the moon: an illustration from a 1913 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

You've heard of a "murder of crows" and other fun collective nouns.  But what do you call a collection of snow?

It's a patience.


> read more from The Right Word . . .

December 20, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of Life magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
"What is the present but the sum of the past in a moment of consciousness?  And because the spirit can call upon this consciousness — this recall — at will, so the present is ever there in the stream of time and the flowing weave can become a broad tapestry spread out for me to contemplate; and I can point to the spot where a particular thread in the weft marks the start of a new design in the pattern.  And I can follow the thread, knot by knot, forwards and backwards; it does not break off, it carries the design and the meaning in the design; it is the essence of the tapestry and has nothing to do with its temporal existence."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Angel of the West Window
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .

December 19, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
Here's a charming moment from Genevieve (1953), dedicated to literary scalawag Jonathan Caws-Elwitt (who coins words in his sleep — and remembers them upon waking!):


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you [—] imaginary numbers have very real and important applications in the real world."
Alan Sultan & Alice F. Artzt, The Mathematics That Every Secondary Math Teacher Needs to Know (2010)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

December 18, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1878 issue of Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1889 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "My wonder was increased by meeting a pair of yellow-topped boots."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"'A rose is a rose is a rose' is false — it is a somewhat different rose in every new context."
Walter Kintsch, Comprehension
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

December 17, 2011

Call it a Hunch (permalink)

It's a book so astonishing that used copies are listed for over $2,000 on Amazon, but a new softcover edition is out this month: Sweet Swan of Avon: Did a Woman Write Shakespeare?

We'd be excited even if Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke weren't our 14th great-grandmother!

And you can bet we cherish our hardcover edition -- worth its weight in gold.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Nothing less than a hypnotising machine":  an illustration from an 1897 issue of magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1868 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Curse You!"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  connect, connect, connect.”

Lawrence J. Cohen, Playful Parenting (2002)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

December 16, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1888 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Precursors (permalink)
Pre-dating the hilarious comedy series "Childrens Hospital" [sic] about a clown doctor who heals through the power of laughter, here's an illustration from an 1891 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Bravo Slap-Bang!"


> read more from Precursors . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"An iceberg is water striving to be land; a mountain, especially a Himalaya, especially Everest, is land's attempt to metamorphose into sky; it is grounded in flight, the earth mutated—nearly—into air, and become, in the true sense, exalted." —Salman Rushdie
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

December 15, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1894 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Your chin is a most prominent and important feature.  Kept clean—soft—fresh—it becomes attractive.  If rough—or shiny—with little patches of beard in sheltered spots—passed by the razor on its morning rounds—the same chin becomes little short of repulsive."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"I don't get shot." —Britny Coker, Western Romance
> read more from On One Condition . . .

December 14, 2011

This May Surprise You (permalink)
Here's a surprising moment from Genevieve (1953):


> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "What in the world are you standing on?"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating that blacks are reacting differently today."
Ebony, Nov. 1972
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

December 13, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Thirteen:  an illustration from an 1890 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
The Shakespeare Papers dedicated an entire issue to one-letter words, and here's one of the pages we contributed.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"With no prompting, apropos of nothing, and to nobody in particular, he announced, 'You know, I once posed nude in Hustler.'"
Suzanne Schlosberg, The Curse of the Singles Table
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .

December 12, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
This one's courtesy of literary rapscallion Jonathan Caws-Elwitt:

Q. What did the florist do upon losing his long-standing contract to provide wedding centerpieces?

A. He made other arrangements.


"Yes, vegetables," by ellentk.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "'Black art'—some of its mysteries."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Never before in the history of the world was there so much reading being done as today.  This may surprise you.  It did me when I really became aware of the fact."
—Lura H. Bartholomew, "Books for the Library," Illinois Farmers' Institute Dept. of Household Science Year Book (1922)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

December 11, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of English Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "I stumbled to my knees; but something held me—something which bound me like a web in a thousand strong silky meshes."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1879 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The white lady."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

December 10, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1871 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "Le Diable!  Le Diable!"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1867 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"In one way, the answer is simple:  extremely.”

John Micklethwait, God is Back (2010)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

December 9, 2011

Colorful Allusions (permalink)
Gordon spotted our Minimalist Coloring Book at Chicago's Quimby's Bookstore, sitting next to The Penny Man.  The pairing is apropos, as minimalists surely have to watch their pennies.


> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: Where do I begin?

A: The answer is right there in your kitchen. (Kelly Hancock, Saving Savvy, 2011)
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1888 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "The moving skull."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
We're enchanted by the mention of "imaginary photographs" in this article from McClure's Magazine back in 1915.


> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .

December 8, 2011

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
"At this moment, with all the Magic Arts thrashing at the outer door, she is etched with stars."
—J. Karl Bogartte, "The Perfect Crime"

(For Clint Marsh)


> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Ellis found his fiddle and played out his dreams."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but please don't pump that thing up again."
Candi R. Murphy, Secrets of the Heart
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .

December 7, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Schrödinger's cat leaves me Bohr-ed.

When they entered Schrödinger's pet into a cat show, it simultaneously took the titles "Best of Breed" and "Best in Show" — until becoming entangled with the judge.

Try putting a live animal into Schrödinger's cat carrier and you'll wish you were dead.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "'Hit my hand hard,' she said."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"The question bears repeating: who needs iron and why do they need it?"
Vegetarian Times, Nov. 1989
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

December 6, 2011

Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: an apple or a banana?

Clue: This is according to a radio presenter.

Answer: banana (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)

Citation: Peter Stewart, Essential Radio Skills: How to Present a Radio Show (2010), p. 216
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1891 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Young Higgins."

Dedicated to Jonathan, who might agree that "Young Higgins" sounds funny.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
The Shakespeare Papers dedicated an entire issue to one-letter words, and here's one of the pages we contributed.


> read more from The Right Word . . .

December 5, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)
Here's a charming moment from Genevieve (1953), dedicated to literary scalawag Jonathan Caws-Elwitt (who coins words in his sleep — and remembers them upon waking!):


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A zombie Jesus from a 1920 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but every thing you do right in designing your [motorcycle] racing diet can be undone by just one thing: forgetting to drink enough fluids." —American Motorcyclist, Feb. 1994
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

December 4, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
You can feel the pulse
in the slipping away
Geof Huth
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1867 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Captain Dahlander's dog brandy."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"But before he says the rose is a rose, the Buddha has seen that the rose is not a rose."
Thich Nhat Hanh, The Diamond that Cuts Through Illusion
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

December 3, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1863 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The moon's wanderings."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  anytime you choose.”

Paul Gipe, Wind Power (2004)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

December 2, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)
"Story over," a dog-eared poem created by Google's scan of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly, Sept. 1892.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "He struck into the grand symphony of forest, air, and water."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"This observation may seem obvious, but it bears repeating: You will be perceived as more professional if you pay attention to your dress, grooming, and manner."
James R. Morrison, The First Interview
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

December 1, 2011

Puzzles and Games (permalink)
87 years before Where's Waldo: an illustration from a 1900 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "I can't find the man."


> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "All around the great shadow balloon was a radiant lunar rainbow."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Now don't take this the wrong way, but for some reason, I don't see you staying in one place for very long."
Nicholas Sparks, The Lucky One
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.