CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
April 30, 2011

Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple enough:  it cannot.”

Lee Rainwater, Social Problems and Public Policy (1974)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"When a reader falls in love with a book, it leaves its essence inside him, like radioactive fallout in an arable field, and after that there are certain crops that will no longer grow in him, while other, stranger, more fantastic growths may occasionally be produced."
Salman Rushdie
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

Portrait from Memoir of John D. Lockwood.

“Ghost images are troublesome if they are sharp.” —The Focal Encyclopedia of Photography

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 29, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
As we noted last year, our 14th great-grandmother, Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke, has many distinctions, not the least of which is her likelihood of having written the Shakespeare plays and sonnets. (For compelling evidence, see Sweet Swan of Avon: Did a Woman Write Shakespeare?) We couldn't help noticing that Mary Sidney's facial features bear an uncanny resemblance to the familiar Shakespeare visage. If the animated gif below doesn't animate, see the before-and-after frames.

(Thank you, editor-writer-critic Michael Redmond, for exclaiming, "Ah! The truth at last!")



> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


12:30.  "The steeple clock marks half past twelve.  The sun is high and burning in the sky.  It lights houses, palaces, porticos.  Their shadows on the ground describe rectangles, squares, and trapezoids of so soft a black that the burned eye likes to refresh itself on them.  What light. ... Has such an hour ever come?  What matter, since we see it go!”

* January.
† February.
‡ March.
§ April.  "At least the twelfth hour came.  Solemn.  Melancholic.”  "And now the sun has stopped, high in the center of the sky.  And in everlasting happiness the statue immerses its soul in the contemplation of its shadow.” 
|| May.
a  June. 
b  July.  "In fact, summer is a malady, it’s all fever and delirium and exhausting perspiration, an unending weariness.”
c  August.
d  September.  "If the fifth hour of the afternoon is that which comes between evening and the second half of the day, the month of September is that which comes between two seasons: summer and autumn.  That corresponds, in the case of a sick person, to the moment which precedes convalescence, and that which, naturally, at the same time, marks the end of the malady.” 
e  October.  "Autumn is convalescence.”
f  November.  "Day is breaking.  This is the hour of the enigma.  This is also the hour of prehistory.  The fancied song, the revelatory song of the last, morning dream of the prophet asleep at the foot of the sacred column, near the cold white simulacrum of a god.”
g  December.  The beginning of life and health (winter).

(All quotations from Giorgio de Chirico’s Hebdomeros.)
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

April 28, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)


> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
We're often asked why we blog using the majestic plural (the "royal we").  Truth be told, it's personal.  Our 27th great grandfather, King Henry II of England (so charmingly portrayed by Peter O'Toole in the classic film The Lion in Winter) is credited with the first recorded use of the majestic plural.  Please don't mistake our pronouns for "the patronizing we" (as in, "Aren't we chipper today?") or "the psychotic we" (as in Gollum's "We wants it, we needs it.  Must have the precious.")
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

April 27, 2011

Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary (permalink)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Film-ictionary . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Words and forms that did not exist at all in standard English some time ago are now becoming accepted into the standard language and may already have become fully accepted. This may surprise you."
Robert Lawrence Trask, Say What you Mean! (2005)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

Portrait from Memoir and Letters of Charles Sumner.

“The ghost in the machine fights the last battle for the human soul.” —Richard Watson, Cogito, Ergo Sum

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 26, 2011

Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"The idea of calling it a 'hunch'! — it just shows how little taste he has."
Anne Virginia Sharp Patterson, The American Girl of the Period (1877), as if referring to Marty Feldman's character in Young Frankenstein


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Who could believe an ant in theory?
A giraffe in blueprint?
Ten thousand doctors of what's possible
Could reason half the jungle out of being.
John Ciardi, qtd. in The Richness of Life by Stephen Jay Gould

via Clint Marsh
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"There is only the finest line between 'I am dreaming' and 'I am in a dream,' since the brain creates both states.  Why not cross the line?"  —Deepak Chopra, Reinventing the Body, Resurrecting the Soul (2009)
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .

April 25, 2011

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Believe it or not, I was young once, too."
Charlaine Harris, Crimes by Moonlight
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)

Imagine a game of "What's My Line," in which either a cherub or an imp whispers into a blindfolded panelist's ear.

Are the whispered words pictured on the right of an angelic or a diabolical nature?


Answer: Diabolical. "Some demon whispered him, that he had mistaken the road to fortune, and suggested that he had better retreat in time, and endeavor to patch up his hopes by another course of life." —"The Exile,” The American Monthly Magazine, Vol. 1, 1833, p. 242. (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

April 24, 2011

Staring at the Sun (permalink)
Prof. Oddfellow walks into a sunrise mural.  (For Gordon.)


> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

This collage is in honor of Emily Dickinson, our beloved 21st cousin.


> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .

April 23, 2011

Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  Be yourself!”

Hakuyu Taizan Maezumi, Appreciate Your Life (2001)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

Portrait from Memoir of Mrs. Rebekah Evans.

“The face of a spirit cannot, like a mortal’s be a mask to hide the feelings of the heart.” —William Bailey Potter, Spiritualism As It Is

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 22, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Ceci n'est pas un homme qui fume une pipe.


A detail from a doodle by the hilarious comedic author and actor Michael Showalter.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Strange Dreams (permalink)
We're so often mesmerized by rows of asterisks twinkling on pages of old books.  Here's an especially dreamy example from Wilfred Montressor: or, The Secret Order of the Seven (1865).


> read more from Strange Dreams . . .

April 21, 2011

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but every religion is the sum of its adherents."
Scott Cunningham, Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner (1988)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

April 20, 2011

Simple Answers (permalink)
"The answer is simple: the problem is one which we have created by making this false abstraction and setting it alongside the facts from which we have abstracted it as if it were another fact."
Charles M. Sherover, The Human Experience of Time (2001)


A still from Vertigo (a film irreparably marred by Kim Novak's clownishly painted on eyebrows).
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

A cemetery as it appears on the other side,

from Memoir of Captain M. M. Hammond.

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 19, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)
Scrabble lovers can save 60% with the iPad edition of our popular Dictionary of Improbable Words (all-consonant and all-vowel words):

http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/wyes-dictionary-improbable/id430260019
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Did you hear about how in the next release of the Star Wars films, C3PO and R2R2 will have a new sidekick?  What Lucas is calling an act of "strategic symbiosis" and what critics are decrying as blatant product placement, the iconic robots will be joined by what looks for all the world(s) like a floating iPad.  The name of this superflat sidekick?  B43D.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Always Remember (permalink)
May we never forget:
  • the Alamo
  • why we are so happy
  • the mystery of probability
  • our heritage
  • to take care of Mother Earth
  • that music is magic
  • what we owe to our heroes
  • from whence we came
  • there may be squalls (of temper as well as wind)
  • the struggles and wants of the poor
  • our vows
  • the price of liberty
  • the sacrifices of others
  • the inscription on the Greek temple: "Know Thyself."
  • our mortality
  • that we are one people
  • the wonderful power of kind words, kind actions, kind attention, and gentle treatment
  • to use our voices, our time, our energy to make this a better place to be
  • that every subject has many different aspects
  • that archeology is about people and their behaviors, in all their marvelous, often bewildering, variety
  • that professional courtesies are due to every honorable dentist
  • the one thing necessary
  • this joyous day
  • how to laugh
(These tidbits were all culled from our research.)
> read more from Always Remember . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
"Only two novels in the past 67 years have not been described somewhere on their dust jackets as 'compassionate,' and both of them were atlases." —M.J. Arlen, "How to Tell a Novel by Its Cover," LIFE (Aug. 21, 1964)
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .

April 18, 2011

It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"'Always,' it bears repeating, 'it is the affliction of one human being that captures the imagination.'"
George Douglas Atkins, Tracing the Essay
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

A BLAZE OF GLORY by John Strange Winter

In a little room, somewhat shabby and rather meanly furnished, a young girl stood looking round on its well-worn and tediously familiar features with great solemn eyes filled with utter distaste and dissatisfaction.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .

April 17, 2011

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Believe it or not, the undead can be very superstitious."
Christine Feehan, Dark Slayer
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Ampersands (permalink)
Ceci n'est pas une ampersand.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

April 16, 2011

Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The simple answer is that some individuals have better judgment than others.”

Frank Manchel, Film Study (1990)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

Portrait from Memoir of Robert Noxon Toppan.

“The ‘ghost image’ corresponds directly to the book we are reading.” —Ralph William Sarkonak, Angelic Echoes

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 15, 2011

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
We're delighted to illustrate a piece about Disneyland's history with our photo of a remnant of Nature's Wonderland.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The Spanish eñe has a stormy history.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"We are first and foremost trapped in the subjective world of the mind and can never exist beyond it as it is our only certainty."
Maria Beville, Gothic-Postmodernism: Voicing the Terrors of Postmodernity (2009)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .

April 14, 2011

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but corn starch raises the blood glucose faster than ordinary sugar."
Ragnar Hanas, Type 1 Diabetes in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults (2007)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

April 13, 2011

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

A LOST LIFE by Emily H. Moore

I am the Doctor's wife in the quiet town of Baywood.  Suddenly, a shot rings out.
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

Portrait from Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.

“Anything about ‘Benjamin Franklin’s Ghost’ is sure to pull.” —Francis William Rolt-Wheeler, The News-Hunters

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 12, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"I hate everything that does not relate to literature, conversations bore me (even when they relate to literature), to visit people bores me, the joys and sorrows of my relatives bore me to my soul.  Conversation takes the importance, the seriousness, the truth out of everything I think."
Franz Kafka, from his diary, 1918 (quoted in Metaphor and Memory by Cynthia Ozick)

Speaking of Kafka, have we told you that New Star Books is publishing a book we illustrated entitled Kafka Franzlations: A Guide to the Imaginary Parables?
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .

April 11, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Creole classification: pidginholing
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Believe it or not, it's all in how you think about it."
David Allen, Making It All Work
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)

Imagine a game of "What's My Line," in which either a cherub or an imp whispers into a blindfolded panelist's ear.

Are the whispered words pictured on the right of an angelic or a diabolical nature?


Answer: Diabolical. "Within me my rebellious demon whispered, 'Now is the time! Break through into the superluminous, hey?'” —Paul Goodman, The Empire City, 2001, p. 471. (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

April 10, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)
Prof. Oddfellow reads some penetrating literature: Jonathan Safran Foer's Tree of Codes.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Ampersands (permalink)
From her lips ampersands and percent signs
Exit like kisses.
Sylvia Plath, "An Appearance"

Here's a photo of an ampersand kiss.
* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

April 9, 2011

Book of Whispers (permalink)
"We are both deaf and blind, and surrounded by mysteries we don't recognize."
Geof Huth
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"My answer is simple.  Because we need culture, and we have anarchy.”

Samuel Lipman, Culture and Anarchy (1994)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

Portrait from Thomas Fuller.

“A blue ghost on a black background is highly visible, but it is less so if the background is blue.” —Jonathan M. Blackledge, Image Processing II

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 8, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

"It all comes down to this," a photo by Troy Holden.
It all comes down to:
  • what works best for you
  • your incredible insecurity
  • the individuals involved
  • coaching
  • a failure to execute
  • money management
  • a simple choice
  • being a coward
  • how much weight a name will carry
  • behavior
  • emotional chemistry
  • how you spin it
  • hitting a key on the computer
  • forming a word
  • freedom and choice
  • rhythms
  • what you know and what you don't
  • using your brain
  • trusting your gut
  • this election
  • desire
  • dedication
  • finding your market
  • higher aspirations
  • memory
  • negotiation
  • safety
  • character
  • what you're throwing out
  • blood
  • human beings
  • one girl
  • attitude
  • priorities
  • accepting responsibility
  • which way you pass the butter
  • greed
  • trust
  • control
  • whether you want your life to be full of accomplishments and triumphs, laughter and good times, or anger and frustration, bitterness and disappointments
(These tidbits were all culled from our research.)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Not Rocket Science (permalink)

Though the moon may not be made of cheese, Jupiter's satellite Io closely resembles a pizza pie.  (Photo via AstrononyOnline.org)
"Okay, this isn't rocket science, I told myself, it's just pizza!" —D.A. Koelbransen, My Li'l Paradise: Built to Last (2010)

On a related note, here's the world's only compendium of things that are not, in fact, rocket science.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .

April 7, 2011

Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"You can call it a hunch or a gut feeling but either way something is not quite right with this picture and it is annoying the hell out of me." —Rebecca Hackney (Love Blooms in a Blizzard), surely not referring to the perfectly perfect picture that is Young Frankenstein.


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but as many as 4% of all applicants to top colleges never complete their application."
Andrew Allen, College Admissions Trade Secrets (2001)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
* Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .

April 6, 2011

It Bears Repeating (permalink)

"We've all heard it a hundred times, but it bears repeating: Don't turn your back on the ocean."
Fodor's Hawaii
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Uncharted Territories (permalink)
"On the map missing data stare out as a blank, often risking giving a misleading impression."
John Langton & Robert John Morris, Atlas of industrializing Britain 1780-1914


Photo by wirehead2501.
> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

Portrait from The Collected Works of George Moore.

“I saw two eyes, psychic and ghostly, peering at me from over a ghostly mustache.” —The Omega

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 5, 2011

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Hands-on testing reveals the surprising truth. Many people take only average precautions against life's numerous hazards."
PC (1984)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"It's a fine line between standing along the shore like an idiot with a stick in your hands and going fishing."
Ethan Wolff, Frommer's NYC Free & Dirt Cheap


> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which word is funnier: turpentine or spatula?

Clue: The answer is also funnier than yogurt and llama.

Answer: turpentine. (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)

Citation: Alan Madison, 100 Days and 99 Nights (2008)
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

April 4, 2011

Book of Whispers (permalink)
"There are many more enigmas in the shadow of a man who walks in the sun than in all the religions of the past, present, and future."—Giorgio de Chirico, Hebdomeros (and other writings)

(via our co-blog at Anima Tarot)


> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)

Imagine a game of "What's My Line," in which either a cherub or an imp whispers into a blindfolded panelist's ear.

Are the whispered words pictured on the right of an angelic or a diabolical nature?


Answer: Diabolical. "While thus forsaken by all human help, all human pity, a tempting demon whispered that it would be better for her to return to her former way of life." —Anna Jameson, Legends of the Monastic Orders, 1852, p. 329. (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

April 3, 2011

Nonsense Dept. (permalink)
From our former outpost at Twitter:

Nonsense phrases were often used by troubadours in Renaissance song lyrics as substitutes for words considered risqué.
> read more from Nonsense Dept. . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Believe it or not, your joyful reinvention will begin by doing what's necessary."
Steve Chandler, 100 Ways to Motivate Yourself
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Ampersands (permalink)

In this quotation about dual allegiances, the ampersand is likened to a geometrical diagram for squaring a circle:

Like an 'ampersand' religious believer, an 'ampersand' political citizen is trying to square an impossible circle.
Dual Citizenship, Birthright Citizenship, and the Meaning of Sovereignty (2005)

Indeed, we see similarities between Archimedes' solution to circling the square and the design of an ampersand.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

April 2, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

Following your bliss is always a real adventure?a journey into the uncharted center of yourself.  Just click!
Thanks to AnitaAnswers for discussing our Follow Your Bliss tool in a thoughtful manner:

Go to this website and use the interactive compass tool to rate your level of bliss. I did it and my results affirmed my inner "bliss” but clued me in to an unclear professional "bliss” whenever I spun the wheel while concentrating on my work. I pledge to work on that until my bliss is congruent both inner and professionally.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple: a lot — probably far more than most women are comfortable with!”

Andrew S. Trees, Decoding Love (1999)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Classic Sightings ~

Portrait from Memoir of Mrs. Sarah Emily York.

“Conjured too, it is a resurrected being ‘beyond’ life, and, like any ghost, delivered over to a third, neither presence nor absence.” —David Appelbaum, Jacques Derrida’s Ghost: A Conjuration

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

April 1, 2011

Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
Wikipedia's listing of the traditional footnote symbols is itself footnoted with a numeral.


> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Is it true, as Momus suggests, that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out'"?  Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

"Because I Could Not Stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson

Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
And then a shot rang out

(Thanks, June!)
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.