CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.

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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
July 31, 2011

Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but I don't understand what you're all so upset about."
Donna Ball, At Home on Ladybug Farm
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"A rose is a rose is a rotary project."
The Rotarian, Aug. 1967
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


Something, Defined (permalink)
"But something, something means all."
Christine Brooke-Rose, Out
> read more from Something, Defined . . .

July 30, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1855 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The Great Spirit."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
"Let's do so well that it can't possibly be explained by our talent or our training."
—the cruelly canceled yet deliriously hilarious Strangers with Candy
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  When we work for somebody else, we do so because we must — and we do what we are told.”

—Black Enterprise, Family Affair (Dec. 1979)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

July 29, 2011

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
Left: Geof Huth, "Photo from Inside My Pocket" (21 July 2011)
Right: Prof. Oddfellow, "Photo from Inside Geof Huth's Other Pocket" (28 July 2011)


> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "He raised his club on high and brought it down with a resounding clash upon the unexpectant bread pan."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D’Ewes.

“A rule of thumb is that the more opaque the ghost, the more able it is to ‘pass as alive.’” —Tom Ruffles, Ghost Images: Cinema of the Afterlife

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

July 28, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from The Right Word . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"That you don't say a single word."  —Angelique Lacroix, Andrea's Diary
> read more from On One Condition . . .

July 27, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "The talking bust."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"Call it a hunch.  If you want to be extra polite, call it a sense of character."
Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye (1988), as if referring to the great Marty Feldman


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Fat is the most valuable nutrient in your milk.  This may surprise you." —Martha Sears & William Sears, The Breastfeeding Book (2000)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

July 26, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "All through the night I sat under the larch tree and looked."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
The law of spectral return:

"The light of those inconceivably distant stars in the Milky Way takes seventy thousand years to reach the earth; if there were a telescope powerful enough to bring the surface of one into view, the events we could observe, however much they appeared to be taking place before our eyes, would be things that had already been past for seventy thousand years.  The idea that shook him with its terrifying simplicity was that in the infinite expanse of the universe every event that had ever occurred must be preserved somewhere, as an image embalmed in light.  'Therefore,' he reasoned, 'there must exist the possibility—even if it is beyond the power of man—of bringing back the past?'"
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of William Francis Bartlet.

“That’s when she noticed the first ghost. It was a faint bluish haze, like cigarette smoke.” —Julia Cameron, Mozart’s Ghost

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

July 25, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1887 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "The Chinese must go."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"If we look at reality for more than an instant, if we look at the human beings passing us on the street, it’s not bearable."
—playwright Wallace Shawn
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

July 24, 2011

A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"If a rose is a rose, does it really matter that it is also a member of the genus Rosa of the family Rosaceae and the order Rosales?"
—Joelle Steele
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may come as a surprise, but you're not a king, and you don't have any subjects."
Glenn "Tex" Riley, Marco's Mission
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

July 23, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1856 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Indignant Britisher [J. Arris, Ouse Hagent]—'Get out of my 'ouse, you 'orrid Hobject.  Go to Hamerica, where they are so fond of you.  You 'ave no business 'ere.'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Take life less seriously and dreams more so, then things will improve, then the dream can become your leader instead of, as now, going around as a garish clown in the motley shreds of our daytime memories."
—Gustav Meyrink, The White Dominican
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  as much income as you need to do business.”

Anthony Mancuso, Incorporate Your Business (2009)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

July 22, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads:

Mars at the Telephone: "Well, well, what is it? who is it?"
Voice in Telephone: "Tesla."
Mars: "Who on earth is 'Tesla'?"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)

"Facts give the appearance of milestones but are, in reality, only empty eggshells; they are the insistent popping of champagne corks at the tables of the rich, which only a simpleton would take for the banquet itself."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Golem
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of James Brainerd Taylor.

“It was a pale, shadowy face, indeed; and it faded quite away from earth.” —Peterson’s Magazine

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

July 21, 2011

Staring at the Sun (permalink)


The lens of the lighthouse at St. Augustine, Florida.
> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"There is no law on earth that does not evoke the Eumenides [the Furies]."
—Petit-Senn, Le Portefeuille, qtd. in Malpertuis by Jean Ray
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
"It's the oldest trick in the book—you know, the ricochet flirt.  The more they ignore you, the more they like you."
Kath & Kim, Episode 2.7


> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .

July 20, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)


 
An illustration from a 1919 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "'Wonderful!' he said to her.  'You are a question, an eternal question.'"

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
"The strange magic emanating from children's toys . . . often exercise[s] a greater healing power over a heart wearied by life than the most sublime work of art."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but it is difficult to find people like yourself who possess, if I may say so, your gentleness of manner." —Carol Shields, "Hazel," Collected Stories
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

July 19, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from an 1897 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "It was vague, but less vague than a shadow."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"Apropos of nothing: 'There are two unpardonable sins — one writing an illegible hand and the other being late for dinner.'" —John Bright, English statesman
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Mary Stuart.

“We feel that this is the land of shades, and the ghost of history.” —W. Macneile Dixon

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

July 18, 2011

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Whispering a secret to a mask: an illustration from a 1900 issue of Pall Mall magazine.


* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
"The whole of life consists of nothing but questions which have taken on physical form and which bear the seed of their answer within them, and of answers which are pregnant with questions.  A man who sees anything else in it is a fool."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Golem
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which word is funnier: tomato or banana?

Clue: This is according to the classic satirical magazine Punch.

Answer: tomato (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)

Citation: Punch (1923)
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .

July 17, 2011

A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"What usually happens is that you start out with something like 'A rose is a rose is a rose' and you wind up with 'Gardenias don't grow on the planet Mars.'"
Jonny Bowden, Living the Low-Carb Life
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

July 16, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1858 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Smuggled candy in school; smoked cigars, and—oh, fie!—read a great many very queer books on the sly."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Our shadows: the bond that ties us to the earth, the black ghost that emanates from us, revealing the death within us, where light strikes our bodies!"
—Gustav Meyrink, The White Dominican


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple.  It will be annihilated and reversed.”

The Irish Law Times and Solicitors’ Journal (1874)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

July 15, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of Pall Mall magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Sometimes you can fan the flame of your thoughts so vigorously that they give off a spray of sparks that fly to the brain of the person standing next to you."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Golem


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Arthur Upson.

“A mere ghost of himself, a faint grey-blue shadow.” —W. R. Grove

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

July 14, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Older and older men are starting families, and when we see white-haired grandfatherly types out and about with their newborns, we can't help but to see classic archetypes at play: Father Time and Baby New Year.  Here they are as depicted in Life magazine, 1902:


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"If there's one thing that bears repeating, it's that judgment will poison your dreams."
—Russell Simmons & Chris Morrow, Do You!

Having said that . . .

"It bears repeating that in the realm of leadership, the advantage frequently goes to the Judger."
—Otto Kroeger, et al., Type Talk at Work
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Imagine a game of "What's My Line," in which either a cherub or an imp whispers into a blindfolded panelist's ear.

Are the following whispered words of an angelic or a diabolical nature?


Forget about everyone else, and focus on yourself and your family.


Answer: Diabolical. "Mary's imp whispered in her ear all the way home, 'Forget about everyone else, and focus on yourself and your family.'” —Annamaria Q. Proctor, Intolerance, 2008, p. 52. (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


Glued Snippets (permalink)
"It is not the parts that matter, it is their combinations." —Vladimir Nabokov, The Real Life of Sebastian Knight
> read more from Glued Snippets . . .

July 13, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)


 
A 1901 illustration from Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "So far, not the slightest attempt has been made to interfere with me."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
When faced with the inevitable, counter with the improbable.
Stacy Schiff, Cleopatra (slightly paraphrased)
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but the truth is that you will be free to love other people when you have learned to love yourself first!" —Ralph Jenkins & Marie Ornesved, Sensitelligent: A Guide to Life (2010)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

July 12, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of Pall Mall magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Strange Dreams (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

"Behind the dark masonry of the forehead there must be enigmas sleeping such as Amsterdam had never imagined in its wildest dreams.”
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face


For George Parker.
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of the life of Jeremiah Evarts.

“Shrouded in dense, spectral fog.” —Sharon Kay Penman, Falls the Shadow

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

July 11, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1884 issue of London Society Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "The gold sprite."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"The livid emaciation of reptiles."
Jean Ray, Malpertuis


> read more from The Right Word . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"Our only certainty here is that the field is open and game goes on!"
—P. Tarazona, "Density Functional Theories of Hard Particle Systems" (2008)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .

July 10, 2011

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"Apropos of nothing, my feet are killing me." —Pete Nelson, I Thought You Were Dead
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

July 9, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)


 
An illustration from Vaught's Practical Character Reader, 1902. 
The caption reads: "What we see ghosts with.  Our spiritual eyes."

Dedicated with thanks to Gordon Meyer, who applies his mysterious powers
to make the everyday uncommon.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Each single action here on earth
Accords with nature's rule;
"I am the author of this act"—
Thus speaks the self-deceiving fool.
—Gustav Meyrink, The White Dominican
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  first base.”

Stephen Baldwin, The Unusual Suspect (2006)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

July 8, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Curfew shall not ring to-night."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Did you hear about the original twist ending of the film Basic Instinct?

Instead of an ice pick, there was a corkscrew under the bed.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Oliver Cromwell’s Collected Works.

“We have no great objection to Cromwell’s shadow (though a bad metonymy for a portrait).” —The Metropolitan

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

July 7, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
"I believe that the old mysteries conceal much more dangerous things than knowledge of phases of the moon and eclipses of the sun, things that really had to be concealed—but which do not need to be concealed nowadays because the foolish throng would not believe them anyway, only laugh at them—things that obey the same laws of harmony as the stars and which are therefore similar to them."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but some argue that almost all postdivorce violence is rooted in imbalanced custody arrangements." —Ira & Linda Distenfield, We The People's Guide to Divorce (2005)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

July 6, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "He seemed to hear a girl's voice, saying, 'Hilton-under-the-Edge—it's a queer name for a village.'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
You've heard of a "murder of crows" and other fun collective nouns.  But what do you call a collection of elders?

"An infinity of elders." —William Beckford, Vathek


> read more from The Right Word . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of Ann H. Judson.

"It was vague and pale and insubstantial but the features were those of her portrait.” —Carolyn G. Hart, Southern Ghost

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

July 5, 2011

Ampersands (permalink)
We're honored to have contributed a chapter to Edvin Thungren's new book, The Ampersand, viewable here.
> read more from Ampersands . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
A hand without fingerprints
still leaves a smudge
Geof Huth
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

This piece is for Gary Barwin, whose pirate-novel-in-progress is our most-anticipated book of whatever year it debuts.


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may come as a surprise, but finished concrete feels good."
Fu-Tung Cheng, Concrete Countertops
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

July 4, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "'When,' he cried, 'will women learn that the small hours of the morning are the very worst in which to start these infernal maunderings about their empty lives?'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
Xenagorabibliomania: an obsessive curiosity about the books that strangers read in open spaces (Nick Hornby).
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

July 3, 2011

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)


> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Puzzles and Games (permalink)
"Everything in the world is like a game of chess ... everything."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Golem

Dedicated to Wilfred Hou Je Bek.

(See also If A Chessman Were A Word: A Chess-Calvino Dictionary.)


> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Believe it or not, children do not always understand the reasoning that seems so obvious to adults."
Positive Discipline for Preschoolers
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

July 2, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)
Tiny gems in Shakespeare's work

We're honored to have designed the one-letter words edition of the exceedingly charming Shakespeare Papers.  Editor Robin Williams explains: "Looking at the wee bits, we believe, allows us to gain an even greater appreciation of the whole."
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)


 
An illustration from The Century, 1896.  The caption says: "Reading the shadow."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Something that appears unusual today might be an everyday event tomorrow."
—Gustav Meyrink, The White Dominican
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  He will undoubtedly get it.”

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance (Dec. 1956)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

July 1, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
July is the month:
  • to promote yourself
  • of freedom
  • of song
  • of roses
  • of great variety
  • of the tempest's power
  • for threshing
  • of vacations
  • of the least bird movement
  • of transition
  • of the insectivora
  • for proverbial meteorology
  • of patriotism and revolutions
  • when the wooden spoon begins to get busy
  • of the ruby
  • when things really heat up in Copenhagen
  • when fuchsias come into their own

(These tidbits were all culled from our research.)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1905 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption simply reads: "Science."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"Coming up with an idea is a confounded thing.  We think our brain produces them, but in reality they do what they like with our brain and are more unbiddable than any living creature."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face


This frame is from the hilarious and endearing Mapp & Lucia series, based on E. F. Benson's novels.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Roden Noel.

“The spirit’s face was pale, the color of a cold moon.” —Norman Partridge, Crow: Wicked Prayer

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.