CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Select Creations
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
December 1969

Links

SPOGG
Magic Words
Monkeys 1, Typewriters 0
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Tonya Harding Shot JFK.com
Lord Whimsy
Phantasmaphile
Crystalpunk
BibliOdyssey
April Winchell
DJ Misc
Grow-a-brain
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
J-Walk Blog
Ironic Sans
Ursi's Blog
Brian Sibley's Blog
Omegaword
World of Wonder
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
August 31, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1913 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "At the same time, he deeply inhaled the odor of the gloves."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"Yeah, call it a hunch . . . Whatever you do, don't call it what it was — a sudden flood of complete certainty that if he looked at those long-ignored records, he would find something.  Because if you call it that, you'll have to admit you don't know what the hell is going on inside your own head these days."
Edward Willett, Marseguro (2008), eerily apropos to the plot of Young Frankenstein


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"The health risks of obesity are exaggerated. This may surprise you."
Susan Schulherr, Eating Disorders for Dummies
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 30, 2011

The Right Word (permalink)

[This note is dedicated to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.]

On the strength of a single droll passage,

I am always disappointed with mountains.  There are no mountains in the world as high as I would wish.  They irritate me invariably.  I should like to shake Switzerland. —Ronald Firbank, The Princess Zoubaroff

a friend and I each bought some selected works of the author.  Though neither of us ended up as card-carrying members of the Ronald Firbank fan club, note some of his astonishing staging notes:

[in a voice which is rather like cheap scent]

[playing extinct eyes]

[All but imperceptibly, twilight begins to form.]

[impressionistically]

[blinking at a flash of summer lightning]

[covering her eyes with an elaborately becoroneted Vanity-bag]


And in his novel Valmouth, I love Firbanks' thingamabobs, such as:

A long sunbeam lighting up the whatnot . . .

Make ready the thingamies!
> read more from The Right Word . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"An essential point bears repeating, however: All of us are expert musical listeners, able to make quite subtle determinations of what we like and don't like, even when we're unable to articulate the reasons why."
Daniel J. Levitin, This is Your Brain on Music
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
"The key to power over spiritual nature has been rusting since the flood.  It is: wakefulness.  Wakefulness is all."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Biography of Frances Slocum.

“The shadow sat down, too.” —“The Naughty Shadow,” a Russian fable

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 29, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1882 issue of Harper's magazine.

Dedicated to Tamara.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
"Objects contain the past, present and future, if we know how to trap their secrets."
Leonora Carrington, The Stone Door (1977)
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

August 28, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Mostly he painted his pictures in the air."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"A rose is a rose but the rest sure ain't."
Lou Riviezzo, Tans
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"The surprising truth is that violent TV programs are not more popular but they are more profitable."
Jeff Cohen & Norman Solomon, Through the Media Looking Glass (1995)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 27, 2011

Staring at the Sun (permalink)
"Look at the sun blazing there among the peaks, too blinding almost for our eyes.  See how he touches the mountaintops and how they dissolve into fire at his touch.  Some day, I tell you, he will burn as we please and spin at our command.  He will be our servant, our convenience, our instrument.  He will be the fire before our door, the light of our first home as we spread out our power and our blood farther and farther amidst the stars."
H.G. Wells, "The World Set Free"

An illustration from a 1913 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.


> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)
"In the most blessed, the most beautiful state the human race can attain[,] [e]ach one of us would grow in a different way, no one would be like anyone else, everyone would be a crystal, would think and feel in different colours and images, would love and hate differently, as the spirit within wants us to.  It must have been Satan himself, the enemy of all colorful diversity, who thought up the slogan that all men are equal."
—Gustav Meyrink, The White Dominican
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  find the Vacuum.”

Giuliano Preparata, An Introduction to a Realistic Quantum Physics (2002)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

August 26, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A ghostly illustration from a 1902 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "He said he wouldn't sit down; he'd prefer to flit up and down the room."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but you really wouldn't have fun at my party."
Sassy (1994)
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of Roger Brooke Taney.

“Reality is accompanied by its spectral shadows only insofar as it is already in itself transcendentally constituted through the subject.” —Slavoj Žižek

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 25, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1887 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "Out of the night and the other world came into him the dead."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from The Right Word . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Many men have forgotten how to play [handball], and some never knew how.  This may surprise you, but it is a solemn fact." —Charles Phelps Cushing, "What Can a Fat Man Do?" The World's Work, July 1916
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 24, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Here's an illustration from a 1900 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "I fell for evermore into the abyss of the sky."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"The Markee observed, apropos of nothing in particular: 'Ha, ha!'"
Puck, May 23, 1883
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
A traveler realizes "that the wild country he surveys is not an accidental assembly of natural phenomena, but the page in a book where these mountains and forests, and fields, and rivers are disposed in such a way as to form a coherent sentence; the vowel of a lake fusing with the consonant of a sibilant slope; the windings of a road writing its message in a round hand, as clear as that of one's father; trees conversing in dumb-show, making sense to one who has learnt the gestures of their language . . . Thus the traveler spells the landscape and its sense is disclosed, and likewise, the intricate pattern of human life turns out to be monogrammatic, now quite clear to the inner eye disentangling the interwoven letters." —Vladimir Navokov, The Real Life of Sebastian Knight
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

August 23, 2011

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
Prof. Oddfellow shares his secrets to longevity:

Delay your mid-life crisis.  As per Zeno, if you never reach your mid-point, you'll never reach your end.

Abhor setting your clocks to atomic time.

Learn to take long-exposure photographs at night.  Long exposures open a hole in the fabric of Time.  The click of the camera extends from a moment into minutes.  Try it and you'll instantly feel how you stop aging.  (If not, ask a doctor to accompany you on your night walk to monitor your eleven medical symptoms and signs of aging as you take long-exposure photographs.)

To mark off days on a calendar is to ensure that your days are numbered.  Never ever cross off a day, no matter how loathsome.

Eschew wearing a wristwatch; a wristwatch leaves a mark — the mark of Time.

Investigate adjusting your circadian rhythm to a 25-hour day.  Make every day count that little bit extra.  Indeed, have "two Saturday nights in a Friday night, if you know what I mean" (as John Michael Higgins says in "Best in Show").

Spend more time at the beach.  It's a fallacy that the ocean makes one feel insignificant; on the contrary, one small step over tiny shells (each a life story) and ancient grains of sand (each an entire world, as per the immortal William Blake) is one giant leap for mankind.


Prof. Oddfellow reads his sundials at night.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"The world we live in is a world of effects; the realm of true causes is hidden.  If we should ever discover it we would be able to perform magic."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from The Life of Rutherford Birchard Hayes.

“You can almost hear the ghost of Rutherford B. Hayes.” —Adam Horowitz

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 22, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "(To be continued.)"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
"A constraint is the germ of an idea absent the idea itself."
Geof Huth
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

August 21, 2011

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Our caption to this illustration from an 1877 issue of Scribner's Monthly is dedicated to house painters.


 
Exterior Eggshell.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"A rose is a rose, but a tulip can bankrupt you."
Richard Zacks, An Underground Education
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you; a neutron, you will say, has no electric charge and so remains unchanged if you reverse all electric charges!  But that is not so: a neutron is magnetic, more precisely a magnetic spinning top ... and if you reverse all electrical charges you also reverse magnetic polarities." —The New Scientist, Jan. 31 1957
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 20, 2011

This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
An illustration from an 1856 issue of Harper's magazine.


   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"A quest is to ask a question in motion."
Robert Irwin, The Arabian Nightmare
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple:  it does not.”

John H. Connolly, Discourse and Pragmatics in Functional Grammar (1997)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

August 19, 2011

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from a 1902 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "They've lit up the sea."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"If one man has an idea, that just means that many others will have the same idea at the same time.  Anyone who doesn't see that doesn't know what an idea is.  Thoughts are contagious, even if they are not expressed; perhaps most contagious when they are not expressed."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of the Rev. C. H. O. Cote.

“A ghostly shadow in ghostly light.” —Eugene Field

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 18, 2011

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed that two nebulae collided to form a cosmic semicolon, but Big Science held its camera upside down and called it an exclamation mark.


> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating that two wrongs don't make a right."
Charles Ruhl, On Monosemy
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"The outstanding characteristic of the Russian people is their gaiety."
Joseph Stalin
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
"Don't be too certain of learning the past from the lips of the present.   Beware of the most honest broker.  Remember that what you are told is really threefold:  shaped by the teller, reshaped by the listener, concealed from both by the dead man of the tale." —Vladimir Nabokov, The Real Life of Sebastian Knight

"Memory has its own special kind.  It selects, eliminates, alters, exaggerates, minimizes, glorifies, and vilifies also; but in the end it creates its own reality, its heterogeneous but usually coherent version of events; and no sane human being ever trusts someone else's version more than his own."
Salman Rushdie
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

August 17, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1891 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads simply: "Heard voices."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"If I remember correctly writers usually find some excuse for their books, although why one should excuse oneself for having such a quiet and peaceful occupation I really don't know.  Military people never seem to apologize for killing each other yet novelists feel ashamed for writing some nice inert paper book that is not certain to be ready by anybody."
—Leonora Carrington, The Hearing Trumpet
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"Fire is the only certainty."
Laurell K. Hamilton, Bullet (2010)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .

August 16, 2011

Staring at the Sun (permalink)
One second after we snapped this shop window display at 2 a.m., we were surprised to see the external lights switch off (they're presumably controlled by an auto-timer). But the shop's electrical austerity was our gain, as we snagged a very differently lit second shot. Click on the photo below to see the second shot.


> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"There is a fine line between success and failure in fashion innovation."
—Lucy Montgomery


A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of the Rev. Elias Cornelius.

“A nearly imperceptible shade separates the possible from the impossible.” —Supreme Court of Louisiana

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 15, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The moose could hear him coming for an hour."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"A rose is a rose is a rose . . . until it dies."
Alan W. Petrucelli, Morbid Curosity
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

August 14, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Every new invention, every new idea to appear in the world puts on a grotesque face as it develops."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may come as a surprise, but we don't need to be right in order to be smart or wise."
Cindy Currier, Forgiveness
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 13, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Schoolmasters ... are like animal tamers; the latter think it is important for lions to jump through hoops, the former spend all their time getting children to remember that the late lamented Hannibal lost his left eye in the Pontine swamps; the one turns the king of the desert into a circus clown, the other a divine flower into a bunch of parsley."
—Gustav Meyrink, The White Dominican
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple.  You save your child.”

Gary Lawrence Francione, Introduction to Animal Rights: Your Child or the Dog? (2000)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

August 12, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of The Strand magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but I don't see you writing a novel."
Sassy (1994)
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from The Life of Cervantes.

“Cervantes ghost-wrote a number of poems relating to the book of Don Quixote.” —Dale B. J. Randall, Cervantes in Seventeenth-Century England

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 11, 2011

Not Rocket Science (permalink)
"Getting a girl flowers is hardly rocket science, right?"
Howard J. Morris, Women Are Crazy, Men Are Stupid (2010)



* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you but one of the biggest reasons [people get stuck in the safety of the status quo] is fear." —Bob Beaudine, The Power of Who (2009)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 10, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Denny was compelled to crawl under the table."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
"All the lives we could live, all the people we will never know, never will be, they are everywhere.  That is what the world is."
Aleksandar Hemon, The Lazarus Project
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"You admit that you know where you met me."  —Maria Geraci, The Boyfriend of the Month Club
> read more from On One Condition . . .

August 9, 2011

It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"If it bears repeating, I sympathize with your situation."
Nora Roberts, Birthright
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Nowadays everyone thinks they can organize; that shows how wrong it must be.  What is right is always the opposite of what the herd does."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of Nicholas Hill.

“Like a black shadow in the uncertain light.” —Isabella Valancy Crawford

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 8, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1913 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "He had a thousand things to say to her ... yet was silent."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"'There's a heap of difference in noses,' he murmured, apparently apropos of nothing."
William MacLeod Raine, Wyoming
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .

August 7, 2011

A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"A rose is a rose is a rose . . . or is it?"
Jim Spaulding, Rebuilding Rose
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
The surprising truth is that most people don't want to sober up at the end of a night of partying.
—E A Stamant/E O Zucca, Instant Sober (2010)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 6, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1858 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The poor summer flowers were forced to come out at unreasonable hours."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Our teachers are like sorcerer's apprentices, who spend all their time deforming the mind, until the heart dies of thirst.  When they have accomplished that, they declare their students ready to go out into the world."
—Gustav Meyrink, The White Dominican
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple — in order to win.”

The Rotarian (Aug. 1934)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

August 5, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A cubist sugar boat from a 1909 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

"At times I had thought of writing poetry myself but getting words to rhyme with each other is difficult, like trying to drive a herd of turkeys and kangaroos down a crowded thoroughfare and keep them neatly together without looking in shop windows.  There are so many words, and they all mean something."
—Leonora Carrington, The Hearing Trumpet


> read more from The Right Word . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Now this may surprise you, but I think the automotive industry is doing its best."
Boys' Life, March 1972
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 4, 2011

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"All things are possible, and the longer they are in coming, the more probable they are."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Biography of Rev. Ezra Keller.

"It is a ghostly portrait of a man, but a curiously effective one.” —Robert Payne, The Life and Death of Lenin

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 3, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "The eyes of terror."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"People under seventy and over seven are very unreliable if they are not cats."
—Leonora Carrington, The Hearing Trumpet
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"The triumph of empiricism in science is jeopardized by the surprising truth that our sense-data are primarily symbols."
—Susanne Langer
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 2, 2011

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"Apropos of nothing, I suggest that we go skating in the moonlight, all together." —Jane Smiley, Ordinary Love and Good Will
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"All complaints about the supposed injustice of fate were silenced by the knowledge that we all follow the road we have chosen."
—Gustav Meyrink, The Green Face
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)

~ Amorphous Apparitions ~

Portrait from Memoir of the Duchess of Orleans.

“The odd, thickened light around her face faded with it.” —David Weber, Hell’s Gate

* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .

August 1, 2011

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "He was dancing on the water-spout."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
"A good middle initial can really add a lot.  Take 'R' for example."
—John Astin in Get to Know Your Rabbit
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Telescopic Em Dashes (permalink)

 
*These em dashes are from Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy.  Some of our magnifications appear in Forgotten Wisdom Vol. II.
> read more from Telescopic Em Dashes . . .



Page of 740



Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.