CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
February 29, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "They meet under death's shadow."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"Call it a hunch.  But I know you got something."
Tom Maremaa, Imagined (2000), as if recalling two scenes from Young Frankenstein




Two stills from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .

February 28, 2012

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
"[Harold] Bloom answers the rhetorical question, can we conceive of ourselves without Shakespeare? with a resounding no." —Dominic Pettman, Human Error (2011)
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

February 27, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

Our friend Teresa at Frog Blog noted that "In the future, everyone will be famous for $15.00," and it's a worthy addition to our ongoing contention that:

Perhaps Andy Warhol Was Wrong, For a Fascinating Variety of Reasons

(Click the title above for our surprising research.)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Fairly radiating a charming aura of malice, she sat back, nursing one knee, distractingly pretty and defiant, saying, 'I will call you a god if I like!'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"A rose is a rose is a rose, but what is a rhinocer-rose?"
Thom Jones, Sonny Liston was a Friend of Mine
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

February 26, 2012

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
This one's courtesy of Jonathan Caws-Elwitt:

Q: What might you call an improv show for rigorous quotation editors?

A: Whose Emphasis Is It, Anyway?

(Thanks, Jonathan!)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "To-night her mind was too full of personal things to permit of strict attention to the text."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

February 25, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "'My dear,' said my wife, 'I have it.  Let the hat make its own vacuum!'"

For Jonathan Caws-Elwitt


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1872 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Yet still she's looking toward the shore beyond the waters black in night."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"As we have said, and it bears repeating, the commitment to closing an exit is not a specific event that occurs at a particular moment.  It is a process that may take considerable time, sometimes several months."
Harville Hendrix, Getting the Love You Want
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

February 24, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1844 issue of Graham's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A ghostly illustration from an 1896 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "An irresistible force compelled me to follow."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way but your primary thrust as an artist is hardly in getting guffaws."
Richard Lewis, The Other Great Depression
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .

February 23, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Why I believe in telepathy":  an illustration from a 1912 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "While I was praying, I saw, hovering above my head, some gold circles."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
Love and loss: two sides of the same coin.


Photo by Jonathan W.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
"The Questioner of the Sphinx":  an illustration from an 1880 issue of Scribner's magazine.


* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

February 22, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Illustrated American magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1861 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The lightning goblin."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
The Shakespeare Papers dedicated an entire issue to one-letter words, and here's one of the pages we contributed.


> read more from The Right Word . . .

February 21, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

An illustration from a 1912 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Are the dim shades of night full of prophecy?"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)


A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "You could see Broadway blazing off to the west, and she'd stare at the lights."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

February 20, 2012

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
"The sky is an apocalyptic mix of rainclouds, sun, rainbow, snow ghosts and I have no idea what day what month what year it actually is."
Miekal And, author of Bystander: An Irreality
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I wanted to send her a wireless message that she was an idiot":  an illustration from a 1905 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "The one word, 'salt,' struck us with horror."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but being a habitual Pleaser can become a devastating form of control, one that can ruin the quality of your life." —Joseph J. Luciani, The Power of Self-Coaching (2004)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

February 19, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1920 issue of Munsey's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "'I propose, my dear,' I said, 'to let him spin until he is permanently recovered or become too permanently dizzy for any use.'"


> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Jinn":  an illustration from a 1910 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

February 18, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "It was Mrs. Dooby's pleasure to sit for long hours looking out of a window."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1872 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "In that instant Dolly's future fate was decided."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

February 17, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "The juice, or whatever it was, didn't seem to be strong enough."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1891 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The headline reads: "Rapid Transit in Great Cities."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"A rose is a rose is a rose, but a pig will always be a pig."
Stuart Gustafson Parables for Life in the 21st Century
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

February 16, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1911 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Hallucinations and the World Beyond: Little comfort in a ghost chair."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1869 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The melted bracelet."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"Our relationship will be platonic from here on in." —Robyn Grady, Fired Waitress, Hired Mistress
> read more from On One Condition . . .

February 15, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Marthe cried out that something was pulling her hair."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "'You're going to have us both,' he said."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer couldn't be simpler. Just forget Mary, and use whichever pronoun you'd use if she weren't there.”

Y.M.M.I.A. Improvement Era (1944)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

February 14, 2012

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)

Matthew asks:

Q: What idiot told the blindfolded, naked kid he could play with a bow and arrows, anyway?

A: Greek mythology blames his overindulgent mother Aphrodite.  Roman mythology blames his deadbeat dad, Mars.
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1912 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Concentrate thought on a given matter."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A Strange Valentine": an illustration from an 1883 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.  The caption reads: "Sprinkling the pulverized herbs over the fire, and with her eyes fixed on the bright moon, she pronounced, in an extremely tremulous voice, the invocation."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but I don't want to do it, tonight.  I just want to be held."
Jonathan Kellerman, The Conspiracy Club
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .

February 13, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from an 1896 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "So deep the dark abyss, so deep the darkness of the rolling cloud."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but a little conflict here and there can be a good thing for your small group."
Doug Fields & Brett Eastman, Connecting Your Heart to Others (2003)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

February 12, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Levitation of the medium, Eusapia, to the top of a table."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Engaged, evidently, in weaving a tale of magic."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "'Skyrocket! Skyrocket! Skyrocket!' he cried."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

February 11, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
See if this very strange phenomenon happens to you: Do the mystical symbols on the cover of Magic Words: A Dictionary inexplicably disappear in Amazon.com's scan of the softcover?  Note that if you click on the Kindle edition of the book, the mystical symbols re-materialize.  Here's the link to compare the two covers.  Is it just us?  If not, what's behind this "now you see it, now you don't" routine over at Amazon?


Scans of the Kindle edition (left) and the softcover (right).  Who or what is behind the magical disappearance of the mystical symbols?
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1912 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Suddenly I was roused by hearing my name called."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1869 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

February 10, 2012

The Only Certainty (permalink)
"It is strange that in this world in which everything is sooner or later lost, where losing is the only certainty, one gets attached to even the smallest things and wants to be able to say goodbye even to a pair of pants, rather than have it simply disappear."
Allen Shawn, Twin: A Memoir (2010)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1912 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "A person is able to transmit messages directly and instantaneously to another person though they may be half the world apart."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Luminous waves rolled toward me, covered with the faces of the dead.  I saw blue eyes all around the room."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"Here I may add that I consider that I am still a useful member of society and I believe still capable of being pleasant and amusing when the occasion seems fit."
Leonora Carrington, The Hearing Trumpet
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .

February 9, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1912 issue of Hampton's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Ludgate Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

February 8, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1894 issue of English Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"'Suppose you try,' interrupted a suave voice."  An illustration from a 1902 issue of English Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Despair": an illustration from a 1901 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

February 7, 2012

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
This one is dedicated to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt, who asked, "Is the actual orange I returned with [from the nearby grocery store] the same orange as the abstract orange I planned to obtain? It looked pretty similar."


Jonathan quips:

And here's another twist of citrus in the philosophical brew: The orange I came home with separates neatly into the Orange-in-Itself and the "orange" that I perceived (not to mention consumed). By comparison, the abstract orange I went out to buy, if considered separately from any actual, tangible* orange, has no Orange-in-Itself identity. I wonder if that affects the flavor.

Also: When I eat an orange, I omit the rind. Whereas when I imagine, see, and purchase an orange, it is an object that includes the rind. So the "orange" I eat is the inside of the "orange" I buy. No wonder it's called the Orange-in-Itself!

*Tangerines are even more tangible, of course.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "Under the influence of electricity, the columns were condensed miraculously into an intense image of Laurent."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York Rose"A rose is a rose is a rose — but it is also a maidenhead, a pudendum, and a whore; it depends on where it is and whose it is."
Frankie Rubinstein, A Dictionary of Shakespeare's Sexual Puns and Their Significance
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

February 6, 2012

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
This one's courtesy of Jonathan Caws-Elwitt:

Q. What do you call a fitness coach who isn't fully explicit in her instructions?

A. An elliptical trainer.

(Thanks, Jonathan!)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of English Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "The secret of life and death was before her."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Luckily the dull radiation arrested him."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but thirst isn't the best indicator of adequate hydration."
Susan M. Kleiner, The Powerfood Nutrition Plan (2005)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

February 5, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Crystal": an illustration from a 1907 issue of English Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of The Ludgate Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "At the table were seated three strange forms."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
The patron saint of the balloonist:  an illustration from a 1907 issue of Life magazine.


Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .

February 4, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Shopping for shipwrecked furniture, we realized that if an item has "distressed" in its description, about one-thousand dollars are added to the price tag to somehow reflect the degradation.  Similarly, used copies of our latest book, Franzlations, get more expensive as their quality deteriorates. For example, a copy in "very good" condition is going for $95 on Amazon.com, while a merely "acceptable" copy costs a whopping $500!
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1869 issue of Harper's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating: when working with ratios, make sure that you are comparing terms expressed in the same units."
Danica McKellar, Math Doesn't Suck
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

February 3, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A singular optical illusion": an illustration from an 1874 issue of Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Right Word (permalink)


The caption reads, "One-letter-words 'are only one distance away from a blank character.' —Jonathan Dobbie."
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1905 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine, revealing the diabolical secret of electric lighting.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

February 2, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1872 issue of Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of McClure's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

February 1, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An Accidental Collage Courtesy of an Anonymous Scanner for Google Books (an illustration from a 1903 issue of English Illustrated magazine).


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1879 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "I'm an owl; you're another."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "He pranced like a red rubber balloon."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.