CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
March 31, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "She sat looking into the April distance."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating: a single study never proves or disproves anything."
Frances Sienkiewicz Sizer & Ellie Whitney, Nutrition
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

March 30, 2012

It's Really Happening (permalink)
"Just tell me...”
" Anything.”
"Is this really happening?”
He laughed, low, and he brushed the hair at her temple with a tender hand. "Yes, my darling. It's really happening."
Christine Rimmer, The Prince's Secret Baby (2012)


The foreground photo of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The mark of the devil: an illustration from an 1897 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Inscription on the human back."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 29, 2012

A Rose is a ... (permalink)
The classic red dot on maps indicating "You Are Here" is as simple a symbol as it is profound.  That red dot, let's observe, is a specific point and yet it's also everywhere, because, as the old saying goes, "wherever you go, there you are."  That red dot is what the Greek philosopher Pythagoras called the Monad — a unit that is simultaneously the whole shebang.  The classic red dot shows up in the classic Human League music video for "(Keep Feeling) Fascination," first as a point on a map . . .



. . .  and then as a literal red spot in space: a painted red house and its immediate surroundings.



Interestingly, we discover that the inside of the house is all grey, from the walls to the floor to the furniture and even to the lightbulb.  The band itself plays grey instruments, but we notice that they're not wearing grey.  This is a crucial detail — to live "la vie en rose," they don't need to dress in flamboyant red or pink but they do need to exhibit a contrast.  Their black clothing stands out sharply from the grey and yet also integrates, since grey is a combination of black and white.



Even in the middle of grey surroundings, the band exuberantly lives "la vie en rose," and we come to see the red circle around their house as a sort of aura that passively affects people in the vicinity.  For example, a boy playing football on the street finds both his ball and his outfit coloured red when he enters the circle.  Quite literally, his very existence becomes hued by virtue of neighbours who "keep feeling [and broadcasting] fascination."




Interestingly, lead singer Phil Oakey is depicted in front of a cracked door.  Had the door been closed, Phil would have had more room to sing and dance, so we know this detail was deliberate.  The cracked door symbolizes a opening between the outer world to inner, sacred space.  The band is not locked away but is accessible to others and free to move beyond any confines.



What the Human League seem to be saying with the red dot is in line with the countercultural mantra "be here now."  In other words, you are here, no matter where you go, so be fully present in the here and now and draw irresistibly the attention and interest of others by being ever-fascinating.

P.S.  Where exactly is the Human League's red dot house now?  Fascinatingly, it's nowhere and simultaneously everywhere, as the structure at 1 First Avenue, London was demolished just a few months after the video shoot.  The red dot is now a triangle of green.


> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"Call it a hunch, and not just in my psychic kneecap."
Karen Moline, Belladonna (1998)


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .

March 28, 2012

Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
"It's the oldest trick in the book, right?  You wait for them to make a mistake."
Steve Hamilton, Misery Bay (2011)


> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1860 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "An artist's trials."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 27, 2012

The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty is that 'someone', 'somewhere', who has committed a certain offense, deserves to die."
Is the Death Penalty Dying?: European and American Perspectives (2011)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Spirit of the Dusk":  an illustration from a 1901 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 26, 2012

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)

We appreciated this review of our latest project in the Winnipeg Free Press:

Franzlations: the imaginary Kafka parables (New Star, 104 pages, $19), co-written by Gary Barwin, Craig Conley, and Hugh Thomas, imagines new parables in the style of those crafted by Franz Kafka. Often reworking Kafka's own prose poems, or incorporating biographical information (e.g., how Kafka is credited with inventing the safety helmet), these "Franzlations" attempt to imagine "The set of all possible Kafkas."

Some pieces reward mainly those versed in Kafka's work. "What would make a crow into a Castle?" assumes the reader's knowledge of both his unfinished novel The Castle and his parable about how crows might destroy heaven. However, the book should still delight those unfamiliar with Kafka. Anyone can enjoy the comic beauty and bitter irony on offer in this exceptional, imaginative book: "Do not despair. There are red party balloons everywhere, especially in the future."
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"Everything good was either immoral or fattening, she added, apropos of nothing."
Richard Russo, Nobody's Fool (2011)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Precursors (permalink)
In the grand finale of Disneyland's famous Haunted Mansion, a ghost sits next to you.  Here's an illustration from an 1891 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Haunted."

[This one's dedicated to our friend at Long-Forgotten, who ruminates fascinatingly on the eccentric masterpiece that is the Haunted Mansion.]


> read more from Precursors . . .

March 25, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Collier's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.  The caption reads: "'See!' holding up something which in the semi-darkness gleamed like a star."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 24, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1908 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "He went forth into the dawn sleepless."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating that a list value is different from an array."
—Larry Wall, et al., Programming Perl
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

March 23, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "He went on milking in a sort of happy dream."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Now don't take this the wrong way, but you're very smart.  I do listen, but half the time I don't know what you're talking about."
Jillian Medoff, Hunger Point
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .

March 22, 2012

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"My response may surprise you. 'It probably won't do you any good,' I say. 'It's too late.'"
George Kinder, The Seven Stages of Money Maturity (2012)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1905 issue of McClure's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

March 21, 2012

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Dedicated to Tamara.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "I haunted the seashore for hours."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 20, 2012

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
It's popularly known that Columbus graciously named the New World after his rival, Amerigo Vespucci.  But did you know that Columbus went on to name Italy after Vespucci's favorite author, Italo Calvino?
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Who are you?": an illustration from an 1897 issue of English Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "The spirit of eternal, changeless silence reigns supreme."


* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 19, 2012

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)

From the Enduring Fascination with Last Words Department:

Enrique Vila-Matas recalls that his mother had a lifelong habit of saying strange things, to the point that his grandmother often explained to visitors: "The child, you see, has lived in Paris."  On her deathbed, his mother spoke a few last words that "due to their premeditated strangeness, sounded to me like an epitaph, though we didn't dare put them on her tombstone.  'I'll laugh at the bitter things I said,' she said.  Her two brothers looked dismayed.  'It's because she lived in Paris,' I told them."  (From Never Any End to Paris.)

(For Greg at Futility Closet.)
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Innumerable spirits mobbed him."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "They carried him into darkness."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 18, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1921 issue of Collier's magazine.  The caption reads: "'Take my wrist,' said Connor Lee.  'Misdirection will not avail.  Greater forces than you dream exist will guide my hand.'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "I knew I was that boy."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 17, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1919 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "Long the enchanted Gordon drank in the beauty of the picture."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating, also, that the very notion of 'disability' implies a value judgment."
Jane M. Healy, Different Learners
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

March 16, 2012

Strange Dreams (permalink)
Do you remember,
when you were a child,
the animals used to call your name?
And you knew in the dark
when the others were dreaming
and you could never get to sleep.
Cat People (1982)


If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration of a glowing "90" from a 1914 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "He sat up in bed, and shut and opened his eyes to persuade himself that he was not dreaming."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 15, 2012

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
There's an interesting moment in every Almodovar film (just before the turning point) when the heroine's love interest either: 1) is sleeping with her best girlfriend, 2) doesn't exist, 3) is the heroine's male self from before the surgery.  Play along at home! 

(Thanks, Mike!)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads, simply: "Question."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"Tomorrow you meet me and explain what's going on." —Kat Martin, The Bride's Necklace
> read more from On One Condition . . .

March 14, 2012

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)
This portrait beyond the veil appears in Graham's magazine, 1852.


* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "I lighted fresh cigars."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 13, 2012

Ampersands (permalink)


For Gary Barwin.
* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "He took a long draught."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 12, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "He held while earth and sky whirled with him."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but the story isn't over yet."
Learning Perl (2005)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

March 11, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1911 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "In suspension in the clouds thereabout, waiting some other command in its native tongue."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "They descended into another house."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 10, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1908 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "A strange new light would shine out of its pages."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating: Your goal (for now) is to get acquainted and develop friendships with the people around you."
Bruce Fisher & Robert Alberti, Rebuilding
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

March 9, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
This one's courtesy of William Keckler:

If you read the Collected Works of Franz Kafka only in elevators, a little bit at a time, it will take you years but you will probably appreciate his writing at a much deeper level.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1860 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Total eclipse."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 8, 2012

A Fine Line Between... (permalink)


Inspired by Dr. Amy Wygant.
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "I'm the lightning fiend!"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"A rose is a rose is a rose, but the same is not true of conspiracies."
James H. Fetzer, The Great Zapruder Film Hoax
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

March 7, 2012

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from a 1900 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "As the night went by he sat there alone, staring into the ash of the fire."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

March 6, 2012

Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
"And scarcely had the last stroke of the hour ceased to resound, when a revolver shot rang out!"

This illustration is from "The Eleventh Hour" by Edwin Balmer and Wililam B. MacHarg, in Hampton's magazine, 1910.


> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Wall Street Ghosts":  an illustration from a 1905 issue of Life magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 5, 2012

A Fine Line Between... (permalink)


(This one is dedicated to all the painters out there.)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of The Strand magazine.  The headline reads: "Venerable Babies."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 4, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Life magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"I may have said this before, but it bears repeating. Great marriages are made in heaven; but so, too, are thunder and lightning."
Ted Bell, Spy
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

March 3, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1908 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"This bears repeating: Always remove the cable clamp from the negative terminal first."
Deanna Sclar, Auto Repair For Dummies
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

March 2, 2012

Ampersands (permalink)
Gary Barwin's "handpersand" reminded us that some handy ampersands are capable of grasping without fingers.


* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "As he read the letters danced before him."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

March 1, 2012

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

By courtesy of our friend at Frog Blog, we pay homage to Sister Teresa of Perpetual Lameness.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Life magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.