CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Select Creations
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

SPOGG
Magic Words
Monkeys 1, Typewriters 0
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Tonya Harding Shot JFK.com
Lord Whimsy
Phantasmaphile
Crystalpunk
BibliOdyssey
April Winchell
DJ Misc
Grow-a-brain
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
J-Walk Blog
Ironic Sans
Ursi's Blog
Brian Sibley's Blog
Omegaword
World of Wonder
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
April 30, 2012

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook: Death finds a lucky penny.  Dedicated to the mysterious Gordon Meyer, who turned us on to the wonder that is Tim Powers.


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
"The answer is simple: Never!"Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer
—Thord Daniel Hedengren
If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .

April 29, 2012

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"Everybody's doing this now":  an illustration from a 1916 issue of Everybody's magazine.


> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1913 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The years seemed all at once to have passed into a gray eclipse."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

April 28, 2012

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"It is worth noting, at least parenthetically, that what drives Oedipus to punish himself and to leave Thebes is not that he has broken the city's laws (Laios' murder took place outside Theban territory) but that he has infringed unwritten laws."
A Companion to Sophocles (2012)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "Saint Genevieve watching over the sleeping city."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

April 27, 2012

The Right Word (permalink)
Reviews of our recent collaboration, Jinx Companion, continue to pop up.  We're especially tickled by this one:

This collaborative work proves that self-published books can really, truly succeed.  The Jinx Companion, a fun and informative study guide of sorts, was compiled by three writers—Craig Conley, Gordon Meyer, and Fredrick Turner—over the course of a yearlong study of Annemann's Jinx magazine.

Arguably one of the most important periodicals in the history of conjuring, and the source of much inspiration and the fodder for many other books, it's a wonder that no one considered planning a guided tour of The Jinx before.

Thankfully, this triumvirate knows how to lead an expedition, and has done so with great style and a sense of fun, which permeates each page of the publication.  The trio culled important or fascinating references, mapped out paths to forgotten miracles, and brought back other tantalizing tidbits from obscurity (or the depths of memory, at least).  Incorporated throughout are the cut-and-paste graphics that made Annemann's original so intriguing and visually interesting in the first place.  All those factors make this a trip worth taking.

... Ultimately ... the treatise is a keeper.  It reawakened my interest in past bits that I'd forgotten about, and it opened my eyes to things I'd never really noticed in Annemann's work.  And that's the general idea, so the authors have clearly scored a hit.

—Gabe Fajuri, MAGIC Magazine
> read more from The Right Word . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"What makes us mad can never be doubt, but rather certainty, any certainty."
Enrique Vila-Matas, Never Any End to Paris
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from a 1900 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "There were two strange eyes glowing at us."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

April 26, 2012

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
As Funny as a Traffic Light

(for Bernie DeKoven)

Sometimes glee lights up in the unlikeliest, most mundane of places. 

I was waiting to cross an intersection, behind a couple of pedestrians.  We waited and waited, yet the contrarian crosswalk signal kept playing a game of chicken with us.  Law-abiding citizens, we remained standing at the curb, even though the traffic on either side was similarly frozen with red lights.  The pedestrians in front of me pressed the crosswalk button repeatedly, to no avail.  As the seconds marched on, we all began to feel silly just standing there.  It was technically safe to cross, and we could feel deference to authority giving over to a craving for self-determination. 

As simple as their signals may be on the surface, traffic lights are so inscrutable.  How intelligent and authoritative are they really?  They might be hooked up to high-tech sensors and networks (some are, surely), but then again any one traffic light might be decades behind the times.  We know that some traffic lights are so smart and witty that they have their own Twitter accounts.  (A light on Michigan Avenue in Chicago tweets such wisecracks as, "I don't believe in false starts," "I hear your prayers, and I answer either 'yes' or 'wait,'" "They say we're all connected," "We have to stop meeting like this," and "From my vantage point, you've already involved the cops."  No kidding: https://twitter.com/#!/ChiTrafficLight).  We're left wondering if a non-responsive light is broken ("on the blink," as it were), or if we're being challenged by unknown forces to throw caution to the wind. 

As if of one mind, the pedestrians in front of me and I finally had enough of this Kafkaesque stalemate.  We stepped forward and boldly crossed that street in defiance of the laws of man and God.  And as our feet came down on that first step, the crosswalk signal glowed "WALK."  And the pedestrians in front of me burst out laughing.  They laughed, and they laughed, and they laughed as they completed their crossing.  And still they laughed.  "The light was red!" the man cackled.  "Then it turned green!" the woman cackled back.  When she'd finally caught her breath, the woman made a phone call to share what apparently had been the funniest experience of their lives.  "We were standing there," she explained, "and then we started walking ... and the light changed!"  But she couldn't explain further, as once again she was overcome with tearful hilarity. 

There's a Zen koan in there somewhere: "What's the humor of one light changing?"  The pedestrians howled on, and their laughter was contagious.  I walked on home, chuckling to myself, with a definite spring in my step.  I'd crossed paths with folks who don't want to have fun but who embrace life's subtlest perversities with gusto.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1914 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "No, he doesn't explain a thing; just says he's coming back to-night. ... Do you think he knows about—them?"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 25, 2012

Strange Dreams (permalink)


For Geof Huth, whose poems sometimes go backwards.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1878 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The beginning of trouble."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 24, 2012

The Right Word (permalink)
The shortest novel is seldom read but at intervals.
—Henry James Pye

Read six books today from our collection of the shortest novels ever written. (We've illustrated them in your honor.)


Snakes in Ireland
by Margaret Deland

There are no snakes in Ireland.





The Dinosaur
by Augusto Monterroso

When he awoke, the dinosaur was still there.





Englewood Entropy

by Anonymous

Dr. Blanton Tufford, a Stanford University physics professor who studied the structure of the universe, was killed on Sunday when a car crashed into the Englewood, N.J., coffee shop where he was sitting.





Untitled

attributed to Ernest Hemingway

For sale: baby shoes, never worn.





Untitled
by Alfred Charles Richard

Coughfing [sic], coffin!





Knock

by Fredric Brown

The last man on Earth sat alone in a room. There was a knock on the door.




Also:

An unusual love story emerges from two entries in Kent County, Maryland Marriage License records. On April 22, 1797, both Jogn Lewin and Robert Curry took out licenses to marry Jane Bird. A note by the clerk on the page on which the records were made, just under Curry's name, says, "Curry was successful." Here is a whole two-volume romance condensed in two names and dates, and a sentence of three words. Probably the shortest novel ever written. (source: Pioneer Pathfinder, 1985)


See also: http://www.hillarydepiano.com/2006/11/01/the-shortest-novels-ever-written/
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"By the way of parenthesis, let me add: If you will try to realize that the inhabitants of the spheres above you are only human beings shorn of their earthly bodies, you can comprehend all I am going to tell you."
Jabez Hunt Nixon, Beyond the Veil
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .

April 23, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "She is not there, Danny."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration of a profile cliff from an 1899 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 22, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Collier's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1878 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.  The caption reads: "The Five Alls: The Parson (I pray for all), The Lawyer (I plead for all), The Farmer (I maintain all), The Soldier (I fight for all), and The Devil (I take all)."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 21, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating that it is much easier to avoid the establishment of bad habits than it is to correct them once set."
Richard G. Beauchamp, Bichon Frise
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

April 20, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
How does the demonstration of a mystery serve to put someone’s mind at rest? We explore the answer in an article over at Secret Art Journal:

http://www.secretartjournal.com/archives/467
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty I have is that perseverance in the habit of writing is usually in direct relation to its absurdity, while we usually do brilliant things quite spontaneously."
—Enrique Vila-Matas, Never Any End to Paris
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from a 1910 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "For a long while he stood before the unfinished canvas, searching in it for any hint of that elusive and mysterious something, and found none."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

April 19, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
When the treasured Enrique Vila-Matas says that "Occasionally my sense of irony reaches Paris itself" (within the delightful Never Any End to Paris), we might add that it's a longer journey than one might think, when one factors in the meanderings of the Seine.

Speaking of irony, we love this Vila-Matas original: "Irony is the highest form of sincerity."


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1878 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.  The caption reads: "In love with an automaton. — Through the stifling cloud of bituminous smoke, he scarcely perceived what manner of being it was.  He caught it up in his arms, and bore it through the passage, and down the stairs."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 18, 2012

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)

Book cover from 1949, via Frog Blog.
I dreamed I had faith in an exclamation point.
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "Don't spring so—I am not a ghost yet."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 17, 2012

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by and for William Keckler.  The quotation reads, "Like someone who goes through a city at dusk collecting cat shadows, you can't be a surrealist that way anymore."
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1887 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.  The caption reads: "What of the night?"


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

April 16, 2012

Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
Fortune telling into the afterlife?  Gary Barwin (a.k.a. the Serif of Nottingblog) shares:

This past March, my daughter and I watched as my wife had her Tarot cards read. We'd never done this...or seen it. The reader arranged the cards in a complex spread. Each card he took to represent a moment in the future, an upcoming month. There was one card...I can't actually remember what it was but it could have indicated death...that he took to represent a change (as in, the death of one thing and the beginning of the other.) My daughter asked him, if the card actually had indicated death, then the rest of the cards would have represented months in my wife's afterlife. He didn't really know what to say. But I love this idea...this fortunetelling into the afterlife. Why should divination stop with life? I have know idea if he was reading the cards in any kind of conventional manner, but, this, our first experience of a Tarot reading, was entirely mesmerizing and poetic, completely in keeping with my literary experiences of Tarot cards.

To which we answer:

Yes!


Detail of a photo by Bart van Maarseveen.
> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but there is no sentiment in presentiment. The s has the sound of z, as in present, presently, and presentable." —Charles Harrington Elster, The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations (1999)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

April 15, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Everybody's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)
An illustration from an 1889 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .

April 14, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1911 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "He was not walking on the wall.  He was walking on air, three or feet above the wall."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "There she waited while the dawn stole upon the night."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

April 13, 2012

Colorful Allusions (permalink)
In a letter to historian and mocker of superstition William Harnett Blanch, the illumined Oscar Wilde wrote, "I love superstitions.  They are the colour element of thought and imagination  They are the opponents of common sense.  Common sense is the enemy of romance.  The aim of your society [a club serving 13 courses, with ladders to walk under, mirrors to break, black cats, and so forth] seems to be dreadful.  Leave us some unreality" (qtd. in Phil Baker's biography of Austin Osman Spare).


Photo by Sarah Sosiak.
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Then the nurse followed."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .

April 12, 2012

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"It may surprise you, but being helpful is often motivated by the hope for a reward."
Wendy Lynn, Truth and Dare (2012)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1883 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.  The caption reads: "A lovelamp. — She remained motionless as the Sphinx itself, her soul in her eyes, as the little lamp began to throb like a living blossom away from the bane toward the current."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 11, 2012

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"And may I add that I believe this is going to make a most interesting
experiment."
Malcolm MacDonald, Dancing on Snowflakes (1995)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "Here's this."

Dedicated to Jonathan.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 10, 2012

It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating: you are not trying to identify every possible risk, just some of the more likely ones."
James P. Lewis, Fundamentals of Project Management
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

April 9, 2012

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)


> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"No offense, but you don't come across as no criminal mastermind to me."
Sidney Sheldon's After the Darkness
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .

April 8, 2012

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to "Thing" from The Addams Family, from a 1921 issue of Collier's magazine.


> read more from Precursors . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1883 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.  The caption reads: "The Devil's Looking-Glass. — Beelzebub sees himself in a mirror."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 7, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The two of them looked at each other with much interest."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"I've said this many times, and it bears repeating now: there's no one in the spirit world who's even a fraction as evil as the human beings we run across here on earth."
Sylvia Browne's Book of Dreams
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

April 6, 2012

Strange Dreams (permalink)
Inspired by and for Gary Barwin.


> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1908 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "Seizing Kum Sin's ankles, he hauled his legs from the bunk, and held his naked soles over the lamp-flame."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 5, 2012

Not Rocket Science (permalink)
"It's not rocket science.  It only felt like it.  Clearly, more champagne was called for."
Sarah Mayberry, More Than One Night (2012)


* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
"Firelight Fancies": an illustration from an 1893 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

April 4, 2012

Strange Dreams (permalink)
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
"Every now and then some people in your audience will try to answer your rhetorical question. If someone offers you an answer, you need to be able to handle the response."
R. Mark Giuliano, Speak Easy (2005)
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A surrealist illustration from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "I made a headlong dash down the end of the keyboard."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 3, 2012

The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty is that you will have unfinished business, and it will weigh on your mind, and you won't even know why."
Jim T. Lindsey, A Traveler's Guide for Lost Souls: The Flaw in the Fabric (2011)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1908 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "The fat man's eyes ... were fixed upon this thing with a kind of stupid intensity."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 2, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of Life magazine.  The caption reads: "And so on, forever."

[For Gordon Meyer.]


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "'Perhaps you would like to come to some of the meetings of our Cult of the Occult,' she suggested."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

April 1, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1921 issue of Collier's magazine.  The caption reads: "Inwardly in turmoil but outwardly composed, Brinn waited for the next development.  It came: a dim light glowed into flame before him, but no sound broke the night's silence.  At last a voice spoke from the surrounding shadows."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The April Fool: an illustration from an 1883 issue of Life magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .



Page of 826



Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.