CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
May 31, 2012

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
There's nothing that a bamboo window shade, a privet hedge, or a lie about a thyroid problem won't let you get away with.

(Thanks, Mike!)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
83 years before Why Cats Paint: an illustration from a 1911 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Mrs. Cat: 'Are you going to sit there and mew all day?  Why don't you paint?'  Mr. Cat: 'I am waiting for my mews to inspire me.'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 30, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1912 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"Call it a hunch.  Legends—and would-be legends—had to trust their hunches."
Dean R. Koontz, Shadowfires (2008), as if referring to certifiable legend Marty Feldman


A still from the perennially hilarious Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .

May 29, 2012

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)

In collaboration with Martha Brockenbrough, Prof. Oddfellow presents the Perdition Slip in honor of DEVINE INTERVENTION, a novel about the world's worst guardian angel, published by Arthur A. Levine Books/Scholastic. For more information, visit marthabrockenbrough.com.
We had the honor of working with the ever-so-clever Martha Brockenbrough on a customizable get-out-of-hell permission slip.  Martha explains:

Do you pick your nose in your car? Have you ever forgotten to send your aunt a thank you card for the holiday sweater? Did you laugh when someone forwarded your frenemy's sexts to the whole school? Do you use the words "frenemy" and "sexts" without feeling a little bit cheap?

Alas, there's is a good chance you are on your way to Hell.

But we have good news.

For a limited time (in the grand, eternal scheme of things), you are eligible for this Perdition Slip.*  It's guaranteed to save your hide from the nine flaming rings of Hell.

Simply fill it in, print it out, and pass it on to all your friends. And maybe even your frenemies.

*Cash value 1/20th of a shekel. No refunds. Expiration date slightly after yours.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Everybody's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 28, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We're so very honored to have contributed to this fascinating analysis of haunted wallpaper:

http://longforgottenhauntedmansion.blogspot.com/2012/05/walls-and-stares.html
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "All but Luella shone white in the moonlight."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "The air is thick with them."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 27, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Everybody's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "As though she listened still to words in her ears."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 26, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "He had conjured up a make-believe playmate in a make-believe world."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1876 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Science versus Mother Goose."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 25, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "I saw that leathery throat gape wider and wider as the beaker approached."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1919 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "'Very well—go!'  The cadaverous personage stood erect and pointed to the door.  'Go—but the demon will tap you on the shoulder and say, 'Come with me.'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 24, 2012

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Arrested Development as the World's Grandest Aristocrats Joke

The vaudevillian dirty joke to end all dirty jokes, "The Aristocrats," is rarely told the same way twice, but it invariably transgresses unmentionable taboos with graphic oomph.  The comedy series Arrested Development (Fox Broadcasting, 2003-2006) is a single, marvelously elaborate Aristocrats joke told over the course of 53 episodes. There's no way to overstate the degree of depravity on display.  Granted, the scatology angle is subtly communicated (the plumbing of the family residence isn't hooked up to any sewer system, so the collective waste matter pools underneath until the structure and its residents begin to collapse into their own filth).  But by no means subtle is the dizzyingly rampant incest between cousins, brothers, brothers and sisters, mothers and sons, fathers and sons, uncles and nephews, aunts and nephews, uncles and nieces—flavored with date rape drugs, disguises and costumes, cross-dressing, prosthetics, bananas, and robots to keep things spicy.

The classic Aristocrats joke begins with a fiercely immoral family visiting a talent agent, and we see this agent in the final episode of Arrested Development, in the person of series producer Ron Howard.  This inversion is fitting, as each new Aristocrats joke is meant to turn its predecessors on their heads.

And so: Did you hear the one about the wealthy clan whose motto is "Family first?" (Ep. 1)

Where exactly to begin?  With the daughter sitting atop a copy machine at an office celebration and handing her brother a photocopy of her vulva? (Ep. 41)  With the mother giving her youngest son a camcorder so that he can videotape himself participating in a "naked pyramid" with his fellow Army recruits? (Ep. 25)  With the twin brother's "only remaining pair of pants" blowing apart? (Ep.  39)  Or with the eldest son using ether to knock out his father, then employing ventriloquism to make the unconscious man ask for a kiss and following through on the request? (Ep. 40)

Revealingly, when the father describes "the sexiest creature I have ever laid eyes on," the middle son thinks it's about himself as he anticipates being made "his father's partner." (Ep. 1)

In the crowded family car, the son-in-law notes that they're "ass to ankles" and asks his daughter to sit on her cousin's lap as the middle son cautions, "Bumpy road ahead!" Later, the middle son instructs his own son: "You're taking your cousin to work today . . . You stay on top of her, buddy; do not be afraid to ride her—hard." (Ep. 2)  That's after the eldest son has discussed erections with his 13-year-old nephew, even as the daughter campaigns against circumcision and "saves enough skin to make ten new boys." (Ep. 1)

The son-in-law searches through his wife's clothes for an outfit to wear to a family function, settling on a frilly blouse. (Ep. 1)  But that's nothing—the extraordinary cross-dressing is yet to come.  At one point he buys a fetish outfit when he thinks his daughter is into leather. (Ep. 9)  And who could forget the time he joins the family for breakfast stark naked? (Ep. 13)

Let's jump to the grandson and his cousin kissing on the lips for the benefit of his aunt.  The fact that they're cousins is "what makes it funny."  Later, they're tempted to kiss again in front of the entire family to "freak them out," and though it doesn't make sense, "isn't that what makes it funny?" (Ep. 1)  This is before the boy is titillated by the trailer for "Dangerous Cousins" and tells his cousin, "We have got to see this movie." (Ep. 8)  The boy compliments his cousin: "You're like this flower.  And I know it's springtime, but I'd hate to see you get plucked by someone who doesn't even care that you're blossoming." (Ep. 39)

For the entertainment of Alzheimer's patients, the grandson and his cousin participate in a purportedly mock wedding conducted by a real chaplain who proclaims, "Now they are truly family."  Later, in a secret room in the house where the father keeps his gay porn magazines, the granddaughter expresses concern that it's wrong for cousins to marry.  The grandson replies, "The Torah tells us that the larger wrong is to put our own feelings before the commitments we've made. . . . I'm not saying it's not weird for me too; I'm just saying maybe we could take those weird feelings and turn them into something positive."  She considers, "I guess it would be a good way to freak out our parents..."  "Let's freak them out!" (Ep. 50)

Now things really heat up, as the two cousins are subsequently assigned the same bedroom. (Ep. 1)  "Cousins can bunk together; that's why they call it bunkin' cousins."  Later, the daughter separates the cousins, explaining to her nephew, "We're all just gonna have a more normal arrangement: I'm going to sleep with my daughter, and you're going to sleep with my husband." (Ep. 12)  Her husband disrobes before his nephew to help banish the boy's seeming fear of nudity. (Ep. 7)  The nephew learns what a grown man's testicles look like when he can't help but watch his uncle laboriously climb to the upper bed while wearing extraordinarily short cut-offs. (Ep. 27)  This is before the boy's dad sends him to give his uncle a bath. (Ep. 47)

When the father announces that he's having a prison love affair with an ice cream sandwich, he tries to toss a bite into his middle son's mouth. (Ep. 2)  Missing personal contact, the father confides, "Daddy horny, Michael," and asks his son to arrange a conjugal visit.  When the son encourages his mother to visit the prison, saying "He's lonely," she replies, "That's what his children are for." (Ep. 6)  The daughter wears a top emblazoned with "SLUT" to visit her father in prison. (Ep. 8)  When the parents finally enjoy conjugal relations, the eldest son can't help but watch. (Ep. 6)

The mother and her brother-in-law have sex in her son's bedroom, on a hand-shaped chair.  The son walks in on them, exclaiming, "Make love in your own hand, mother!" (Ep. 25)  Speaking of hands, the youngest son's prosthetic hand gets used by his parents as a sex toy.  "It's in the dishwasher," his mother says.  "Your father and I were using it for something." "Oh for god's sake; can't you keep my hand to yourself?"  The mother jokes with her middle son about the youngest: "He's just jealous that I have a man back in my life.  And guess what else is back?  My friskiness.  Mama horny, Michael."  "I'm amazed Dad hasn't strangled himself with his belt yet."  "Oh, we're into all kinds of freaky scenes." (Ep. 42)

The mother chides her middle son for not spending more time with her youngest: "Everyone's laughing and riding and cornholing except Buster. . . . You could pretend to be interested in him."  Referring to his mother later, the middle son says, "She always has to wedge herself in the middle of us so she can control everything."  The youngest son chuckles, saying, "Yeah, mom's awesome." However, in a Tourettes-like fit, he later calls her "an uptight b---- --- -----  [approximately three sentences are bleeped out]; You old horny slut!"  Later, the mother interrupts a business meeting, brandishing candy at her youngest son: "Here's a candy bar.  No, I'm withholding it.  Look at me getting off." (Ep. 3)

The son-in-law plays Cupid by rearranging the parts in a school play so that his nephew can kiss a male cousin (who is playing a female role).  When his nephew quits the play, the son-in-law casts his own daughter in the male lead so that she can kiss her cousin.  The nephew, George Michael, "watched as [his cousin] Maeby shared the kiss that should have been his with the boy he almost had to kiss.  But to Maeby's surprise, she did not enjoy kissing [her cousin] Steve.  'You smell like my mom.'" (Steve is wearing his aunt's dress, you see.)  (Ep. 3)

The youngest son describes his new girlfriend to his brother: "I cannot tell you how liberating it is to be with someone who's not Mom."  However, his girlfriend is his mother's age, shares her name, and is her best friend. (Ep. 4)  Indeed, the girlfriend changed him as a baby.  The mother puts her youngest son's bed in storage: "I guess you'll have to decide which Lucille you want to spend your nights with," to which he exclaims, "I'm going to continue dating, Mom," which sounds like "dating mom" and indeed "It's starting to feel a little like it." (Ep. 9)  The youngest son eventually tells his girlfriend, "You're replacing my mother." (Ep. 12)  After the youngest son stops dating his mother's best friend, the eldest son takes a turn, enticing her with the promise of elevating the knees of her Posturepedic bed. (Ep. 31)

Undaunted, the mother prepares to participate in a charity bachelorette auction: "I think there's a certain bachelor who won't mind coming home with me at the end of the evening" (referring to her youngest son).  The father, meanwhile, can't choose which prison gang to align himself with: "I feel like the prettiest girl at the dance."  At the bachelorette auction, the middle son bids on and wins his sister. (Ep. 5)  When the auction comes around again, the mother asks her middle son to bid on her and chides her daughter to find someone else because her brother is "bidding on mother."  She later coaches her middle son how to compete with other bidders: "Start at five grand.  If there are other bidders, back off gracefully.  Shout out, 'I get her 364 days for free.'" (Ep. 31)

Keeping it all in the family, the father's secretary/mistress has sex in a supply closet with the eldest son. (Ep. 6)  Meanwhile, the middle and youngest sons lust after their older brother's "horny immigrant" girlfriend (with whom he sleeps in his mother's bed) until the older brother gives the middle brother permission to "Go for it." (Eps. 4, 7, 8, 12, 13)  When the grandson asks his dad if he's dating the family's publicist, the dad says, "I'm absolutely not dating her.  It's just you and me; Bluth boys." (Ep. 11)  The granddaughter asks her uncle, "Why does everyone have to date, anyways?"  He replies, "Isn't family enough for people?"  The middle son announces to his son, "That cousin of yours is really something.  Too bad you can't date her." (Ep. 25)  The son writes an entire box's worth of love letters to his cousin. (Ep. 30)

As an aside, the middle son hires a troupe of male strippers to teach his own son a lesson. (Ep. 10)

The middle son shares his bed with someone for the first time in years: his youngest brother.  Later, he sleeps with his own son's ethics teacher, on whom the boy has a crush.  The boy's aunt thinks her nephew wants a new mother and says, "I must say I'm a little hurt that you haven't considered me."  The boy replies, "But you're my aunt."  "That doesn't matter; aunts can fill that role, teachers can fill that role, and some day you're gonna find the right woman to fill that role, but till then, I'll be right across the hall." (Ep. 14)

Upon being introduced to her newly adopted uncle, the granddaughter says, "So we're related; hey, do you want to go to a dance?"  Her cousin mutters, "Great; another uncle to compete with."  The granddaughter goes to the dance with her new uncle, only to ditch him for her cousin Steve. (Ep. 14)

In prison, the father sells his son-in-law for a pack of cigarettes. (Ep. 18)  The son-in-law licks his father-in-law's hand when shushed. (Ep. 35)  The middle son calls his mother from the prison and asks her to tell his older brother that he's waiting for him: "I've got nice, hard cot with his name on it."  She replies, "You'd do that to your own brother?" (Ep. 40)

The oldest son's wife confesses, "I'm in love with your brother-in-law."  He: "You're in love with your own brother?  The one in the Army?"  She: "No; your sister's husband."  He: "Michael?  Michael."  She: "No; that's your sister's brother."  He: "No; I'm my sister's brother.  You're in love with me.  Me!"  She: "I'm in love with Tobias."  He: "My brother-in-law?"  She: "I know it can never be, so I'm leaving.  I'm enlisting in the Army."  He: "To be with your brother?" (Ep. 20)

The middle son traditionally takes his own boy to "bring your daughter to work day," until he takes his niece. (Ep. 21)  The boy is in touch with his feminine side and even volunteers to help with his uncle's "Sawing the Lady In Half" trick, playing the lady's legs. (Ep. 9)

The youngest son pouts that his mother called her middle son to escort her to a soccer game, saying "I guess I'm not good enough to be her husband."  The middle son questions his mother: "Why can't Buster pretend to be your escort; that's the way he's got it in all his cartoons."  She explains, "They already know he's my son." When the middle son declines, she calls on her husband's twin brother. (Ep. 21)

The daughter asks her twin brother, "I mean, how do you not have sex with me?"  He responds, "It's a struggle." (Ep. 22)  "And that's when Maybe decided to use her uncle to make her cousin jealous." (Ep. 23)

The father's twin brother goes to bed with his sister-in-law.  She worries aloud that her son will hear them making love.  The twin brother replies, "That's what makes it so hot."  Moments later, the son walks into the bedroom saying he heard "zoo noises" and the twin brother flagrantly displays his erect penis. (Ep. 24)

The grandson whispers sweet nothings to his girlfriend, making his dad jealous he's not the target of the boy's affections. (Ep. 25)

The son-in-law invites his brother-in-law to a dinner for two, noting, "If I blew myself early, I'll be nice and relaxed for a 9 o'clock reservation." (Ep. 25)

The granddaughter tells her mother, "All Pop-Pop ever wanted was to see you with another man besides daddy."  Her mother replies, "You're right.  You know what? I'm gonna throw on a skirt, take off my underwear, and make your Pop-Pop proud." (Ep. 26)

The father dresses in his middle son's dead wife's maternity clothes, wears her perfume, and confesses that he used her old breast pump as a sex toy. (Ep. 27)  Later, he hosts a play tea party with his granddaughters childhood dolls and asks, "Who wants to take their top off?" (Ep. 35)

By the way, the family attorney asks the middle son to answer a "yes/no" question by tapping him on the fanny. (Ep. 27)

The granddaughter tells her cousin Steve that her mom is actually her dad in drag; Steve finds himself attracted to the supposed transvestite and agrees to a lunch date.  The granddaughter explains to her other cousin, "He's obsessed with her; that's all he wants to talk about.  But it's only because he thinks she's got a penis.  I told him she was a tranny." (Ep. 27)

Acting as president of the family business and wearing his father's suit, the eldest son announces, "I did finally get into Dad's pants, though I had have the crotch taken in a little bit." (Ep. 28)

At the office Christmas party, the middle son and his niece sing a karaoke duet of "Afternoon Delight," the rampant sexual innuendos ["The thought of rubbing you is getting so exciting"] shocking the entire staff.  The next day, at another office party, the daughter and her nephew notice the middle son and his niece are "all over each other," so to make them jealous they sing a karaoke duet of "Afternoon Delight."  The daughter's husband tells a flummoxed staff member, "That's my wife and my nephew; we have an open relationship." (Ep. 28)

When the mother becomes tense in her husband's twin brother's absence, her husband tells his middle son that his wife needs to have sex with his brother.  The middle son suggests that his uncle provide his mother with some "Afternoon Delight," to which he responds, "The question is which way do I try to get it in her?  Maybe I'll put it in her brownie..." (Ep. 28)

The mother appears on the cover of the Balboa Bay Window magazine with her youngest son for an article titled "Why I want to marry my mother." (Ep. 29)  Later, the son hires a photographer for an update article entitled, "Keepin' It Fresh."  The photographer comments, "Okay, I think we have enough of you two kissing." (Ep. 33)  The mother attends the "Motherboy" event—a dinner dance aimed at promoting mother-son bonding—twenty-five times with her youngest son, and on a few occasions had won "Cutest Couple."  As her son entered sexual maturity and she left it, it became harder to win.  Now it's "Motherboy XXX." (Ep. 35)

The youngest son needs a date for a dance, and the middle son suggests their mother.  "I think the age difference is really starting to catch up to us," the youngest son explains.  The brother-in-law cuts in: "My schedule is as open as my relationship with my wife.  Why don't we pair up? . . . Even it means me taking a chubby, I will suck it up."  The middle son interrupts: "Enough family stuff for today."  Later, at a bar, when asked if there's a girl in his life, the youngest son replies, "Well, I would hardly call my mother a girl, but she's still very much a part of my life." (Ep. 30)

The middle son wins a romantic weekend and invites his own son: "I thought maybe we could do it together; you know, sort of like a Valentine's present. . . . What do you say?  We'e got a basketful of father-son fun here."  His son picks up a bottle of Kama Sutra oil, next to edible body chocolate.  The middle son's brother-in-law walks up, saying, "You really are quite the Cupid, aren't you.  You can sling your arrow into my buttocks any time."  Later, the granddaughter passes along a message to her uncle: "My dad wanted me to thank you for the romantic getaway; don't tell me what that means."  When asked where her father is, she replies, "He left, dressed all Westerny; you can leave me out of that part, too."  Her uncle walks off, exclaiming, "I screwed my brother-in-law."  "Well, I'm all grown up now," says the niece. (Ep. 32)

When the middle son tells his sister that he enjoyed three orgasms in a row with his childhood girlfriend, his sister is unimpressed, having just masturbated three times. (Ep. 32)

The family solicits "Uncle Jack" to buy back shares of the company stock from a rival, luring him with the promise of sexual favors from either the mother or the daughter, at the father's suggestion and arranged by the middle son. (Ep. 32)

Referring to the middle son's former lover, the eldest son says, "You know what I'd do?  Have her pee in a cup.  And have her pee in a cup right in front of me." (Ep. 33)

The daughter and her husband rekindle their romance by making out while hidden in a shower at the middle son's girlfriend's house as they wait to surreptitiously collect her urine so as to determine whether or not she's impregnated with the combined sperm of an interracial gay couple. (Ep. 34)

The youngest son confides that his mother likes to change clothes in private before asking to be zipped up, "yet anything goes at bath time."   One of her garments has a zipper so long that her son has to get on his knees to start it. (Ep. 35)

The mother catches the youngest son in bed with the maid and fires her, replacing her with a Roomba vacuum.  Then she catches her son in bed with the Roomba.  No one bats an eye when the son-in-law dresses in drag to work as the family's new housekeeper, "Mrs. Featherbottom." (Ep. 36)

At a party to celebrate his pre-engagement, the grandson catches his father making out "secularly" with his girlfriend's mother.  Meanwhile, the boy's grandfather renews his wedding vows: "I will love and honor your spirit and flesh—first the flesh.  I will caress and tweak; I will nibble and bite; I will blow, alternatingly hot and cool. I will always be here for you to rest your ankles upon my shoulders."  The grandson's girlfriend gets hot flashes listening to the vows. (Ep. 38)

The oldest son complains, "Well, gee, I didn't think the woman I'd be checking out at Spring Break would be Mom."  The youngest son retorts, "She's better looking than the whores you date. . . . Mom's still got it!"  What the mother wants, however, is to enjoy a spa weekend with her middle son: "I want to spend Spring Break with you."  But first, she engages in a drinking contest with her husband's secretary, wagering a cooler containing 250 cc's of his "reproductive material." (Ep. 39)

At the pier, the son-in-law challenges young male students on Spring Break to strip on camera while his wife films them: "Let's see some bananas and nuts.  Perhaps we should just pull their pants off." (Ep. 39)

The secretary and the brother-in-law both flash their nipples at the middle son in his office.  He then sets the two of them up on a date, and they go to Vegas together. (Ep. 40)

The middle son suggests that his mother take a date on a getaway to the family cabin in the woods while her husband is in prison.  She asks, "How am I supposed to find someone willing to go into that musty old claptrap?"  After three full beats, it dawns on the son that his mother is referring to the cabin. (Ep. 41)

When the eldest son cries over being neglected as a child, he demands that the middle son taste his tears.  "I'm not going to lick your eye."  A minute later, when the eldest son is crying tears of happiness and embraces his brother for another lick, exclaiming, "Taste the happy," the middle son notes, "It tastes a lot like sad." (Ep. 41)

When the middle son can't go camping with his own son, he suggests the boy "pop a tent in front with your cousin Maeby."  When the cousin excuses herself as "not outdoorsy," her uncle says to his son, "This is a good chance for you to rub off on her." (Ep. 41)

The granddaughter Maeby brags to her cousin George-Michael that she's "getting pretty serious" with her other cousin.  "That Steve sure knows how to please a lady!" Masking jealousy, George-Michael responds, "I was hoping he would be gifted sexually. ... What a fun, sexy time for you!"  Later, George-Michael discovers Steve naked and asleep in Maeby's bed.  When he asks her what happened, she replies "I gave him a roofie.  A girl's gotta grow up sometime." (Ep. 43)

Apropos of nothing, the daughter announces to the family attorney (in front of his own daughter), "That's so funny, because I can put my leg behind my head!" (Ep. 44)

The eldest son reveals how he wields his power as a beauty pageant judge, so that he can bed the third place contestant—a little bit plain but with super low self-esteem.  The third place contestant turns out to be his nephew's girlfriend, a devout Christian, whom we find out the eldest son is dating. (Ep. 44)  Later, the eldest son confides to the middle son, "I've got this Christian girlfriend, and she's trying to get me to become a better man and reconnect with my son, and I'm trying to get her to renounce God and f*** me, and I just want to prove to her that I'm worth it." (Ep. 47)  Meanwhile, the son-in-law introduces to his wife a priest he met at the gym.  The priest is carrying a "Let Priests Marry" sign. (Ep. 50)

The son-in-law challenges his nephew to have sex with his girlfriend while he watches.  When the nephew is reluctant, the son-in-law tells the girl, "You need to decide whether you want a man or a boy.  I know how I'd answer." (Ep 44)

By the way, the son-in-law's business card reads "analrapist" [sic], his compound version of analyst and therapist. (Ep. 43)

The father counsels at-risk young gay men at a fairground "Startled Straight" tent: "You want to be some guy's girlfriend?  Want to have some guy reach you in the middle of the night, start messin' with your junk?"  Someone asks, "Is he ugly?"  "No—it's pitch black; you don't see him.  It never stops, guys.  And everybody acts like it's no big deal."  "Is there a cover charge?"  "There's nothing to do all day except lift weights, fold laundry.  Get thrown into a cage with a bunch of sweaty men." (Ep. 44)

The middle son's fiancé, a mentally retarded female, defiantly announces her engagement to her uncle.  He's concerned: "It's not your fault your parents were cousins, but here we are.  I've been charged with taking care of you, and I'm bloody well gonna do it!"  She answers, "Michael will be my cousin soon enough, because we're getting married." (Ep. 46)

The daughter says to her twin brother: "You may not like it that Mom has needs, but it never bothered you when Dad was running around."  He replies, "That was different."  She then asks, "Well how about when she was sleeping with Uncle Oscar?"  "The guy looks just like Dad—I don't know, he's family, it seemed only natural they'd be together."  Anxious about the impact of this statement on the grandson's taboo relationship with his cousin, he asks "What is natural?  Is there new legislation on this now?" (Ep. 47)

While on a date with her husband's prison warden, the mother calls her daughter asking her to deliver a tube of vaginal lubricant. (Ep. 47)

During a tight embrace, the eldest son (who has a magician's dove hidden in his crotch) tells his middle brother "If you feel something moving down there, it's just the bird;" however the middle son sees that the bird has escaped, thus proving that the eldest brother is sexually aroused. (Ep. 48)

After his sister glues the broken thumb back onto his prosthetic hand, the youngest son lashes out against his uncaring mother: "Sister's my new mother, mother.  And is it just me, or is she looking hotter, too?"  "Why don't you marry her?"  "Maybe I will!" (Ep. 49)

In a televised mock trial, the son-in-law asserts that he knows nothing because he spends "so much time making sweet love on my wife that it's hard to hear anything over the clatter of her breasts." (Ep. 50)

Days earlier, the middle son awakens to find his teenaged son in his bed.  The boy was there in fear of "the monster called lust"—his lust for his cousin, with whom he made it to "second base," having gone in "head first like Pete Rose."  Later, the middle son awakens to find his twin sister in his bed, drunk. He broaches the subject of their respective children's physical relationship, which prompts her to straddle him, exclaiming that she's only his adopted sister.  "I know you've always found me attractive; you've been telling me that for the last 40 years."  The next morning, the middle son awakens to find his brother-in-law in his bed.  "You can't spoon me like that," the middle son says. (Ep. 53)

When he learns that his sister was adopted and plans to marry her middle brother, the eldest brother hits on her at a party: "Why go for the best when you can go for the rest ... of your life with a younger man?"  Oh, and the middle son awakens to find his father in bed with him. (Ep. 53)

The middle son makes a date with a prostitute he thinks may be his long-lost twin sister.  He "felt a connection like he'd never felt with anyone in his family."   He offers her a job at the family business, handling the entire staff: "you're going to be filling like three openings."  When asked about her specialty, she says, "I do all sorts of scenes."  He entreats the staff to put her into "any position you want."  He doesn't yet realize that her pimp is his older brother's hand puppet, but when he does, the brother offers him a "family discount" and then mutters, "Maybe I should be getting a family rate." (Ep. 51)

And what does this family call its act?

The "Arrest-ocrats."


The foreground photo of this collage is from the world's grandest Aristocrats joke, Arrested Development.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

May 23, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "But excitement and clamor over galloping about the country dressed like a canned tomato are simply ridiculous."

[For Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.]


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "It still lingered on the door-mat."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 22, 2012

The Right Word (permalink)
An illustration from a 1917 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "That is pronounced 'Cwix-ot-ic,' she corrected."


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1911 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

May 21, 2012

Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple: a ratio is only a ratio, and tells us nothing about absolute numbers.”

—David Benatar

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty, the only promise, [is] that night [is] coming soon."
Larry D. Sweazy, The Badger's Revenge (2011)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "'And I,' he said, 'lived nine months in the same house with that skunk.'"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 20, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "The face of a very old woman, scowling forever."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Witching Hour":  an illustration from a 1909 issue of Life magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 19, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of Scribner's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating: Getting a job is a job."
Harvey Mackay, Use Your Head to Get Your Foot in the Door
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

May 18, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A verbalized thought-mummy":  an illustration from a 1906 issue of Everybody's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A ghostly illustration from an 1896 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "I saw what made my heart stand still."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 17, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A "saccular sea-serpent" and a visually poetic firework: a collage of two (seemingly) unrelated images from the July 1906 issue of Everybody's Magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "He sat ... looking across the dark olive depths of the cañon between him and the opposite mountain."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

May 16, 2012

Not Rocket Science (permalink)
"It's a cotillion committee, for God's sake. It's not rocket science."
Jane Haddam, Blood in the Water (2012)


* Inspired by Martha Brockenbrough, our puzzle book Not Rocket Science is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Not Rocket Science . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1914 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 15, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "He stood staring at the shadow on the wall."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
On this day in history—Sunset at the equator on May 15, 1902.  An illustration from a 1903 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 14, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from a 1902 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "The childish eyes, wide and wistful, doubtless saw in the bright flames pictures of wonder and delight."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Don't stack tilings on top of each other in piles. I know this may surprise you, but think about it."
Linda Koopersmith, The Beverly Hills Organizer's Home Organizing Bible
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

May 13, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Everybody's magazine.  The caption reads: "Dr. Judd had been grasped by two plants and was unable to free himself."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "Forward again, by the dim, intermittent light of the moon and stars, through the ghostly, haunted forest."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 12, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Key to Nowhere":  an illustration from a 1915 issue of Everybody's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "He heard their seductive voices.  They danced around him in numbers."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 11, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The thing grew in sound":  an illustration from a 1919 issue of Munsey's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "He saw the chicks ... gigantic and gawky ... and still growing."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 10, 2012

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you but go light on salads and vegetables; these can cause a host of digestive problems."
The Everything Running Book (2012)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1914 issue of McClure's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

May 9, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
At the time of posting, the caption in this illustration from a 1921 issue of Munsey's magazine is a GOOGLEWHACK!  "You don't grouch because a lily doesn't grow lima beans, do you?"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The headline reads: "Footprints of the Devil in our own country."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 8, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1921 issue of Munsey's magazine.  The caption reads: "For an instant Bob stood thus, then slowly the swear words, whatever they were, slipped from his mind."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Substance and the Shadow":  an illustration from a 1901 issue of Life magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 7, 2012

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1881 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 6, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Everybody's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "'I love her more every minute,' he informed a large boulder."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 5, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "Dreamed of clipping about on a silently revolving wheel."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"Still, the fact remains that—this bears repeating—there was a live shark on the Metromover."
Dave Barry, I'll Mature When I'm Dead
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

May 4, 2012

The Right Word (permalink)
We're honored that the Frog Applause comic strip asked us to name the fear that one's ear trumpet will be struck by lightning.  Here's the backstory, including a cartoon secret.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1919 issue of Munsey's magazine.  The caption reads: "Through the open window she hurled the fat-faced Buddha."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The headline reads: "His only rival."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 3, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1919 issue of Munsey's magazine.  The caption reads: "He saw a veritable cloud of evil creatures, swimming about like fish in dark waters."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1879 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 2, 2012

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed of sitting on a glistening rock, thinking sadly of someone who had changed and drifted away from me.


> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"We've all fallen prey to uttering hackneyed and schmaltzy phrases, referring to the previous night as 'an unforgettable evening.'  But, at the end of life, only those who really haven't experienced unforgettable evenings are ridiculous, [Fernando] Pessoa would say."
—Enrique Vila-Matas, Never Any End to Paris
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A crack in the sky from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

May 1, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"What is possible may be done.  What is impossible must be done."
—Cornish proverb
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)


An illustration from an 1883 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Bringing in the May."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .



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