CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
July 31, 2012

Pfft! (permalink)


This still is from Derren Brown's stage show entitled Enigma.
> read more from Pfft! . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1872 issue of Harper's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 30, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Behind him the boy fingered the ash-plant."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from an 1894 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "As seen through the face-glass."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

July 29, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Robert Mitchum was more buxom than many realize.  In fact, when he donned a low-cut blouse, he was nothing short of a bombshell!  It's interesting to see Marilyn Monroe with a more "butch," brunette hairstyle.  A timeless beauty like hers could get away with any look.


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"One of these days someone should write a book called What is this thing called philosophy?"
Alan Chalmers, The Scientist's Atom and the Philosopher's Stone (2009)
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1872 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The man of the future regarding the things of the past."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 28, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Christmas in July" has become a day.  It used to be a season.

In the last fifty years, Christmas in July has become much more materialistic, even perversely overcommercialized.

For too many, Christmas in July is the most stressful event of the year.

On a late walk last night, we nearly stumbled over a tinseled star discarded in the street like last week's TV Guide.  The photo says it all, doesn't it?


This photo was inspired by Gordon Meyer's Las Vegas: Underfoot.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Indubitably (?) (permalink)
"Facts are indubitably facts, and wish-thinking has no place in science."*
The Rotarian (Jan. 1938)
*If Merriam (or Webster?) is correct that indubitably is not the kind of word that gets used in everyday conversation, except perhaps for humorous effect, then insert comedy drum roll here.
> read more from Indubitably (?) . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1921 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Above you the speech of unseen voyagers going north."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 27, 2012

The Right Word (permalink)
You'll recall that in January of 2011 we presented an Internet first: an actual lime bathed in limelight.

We're now prepared to reveal the word that made it all possible: pentadecylparatolylketone.  It's the chemical makeup of limelight, and it's "the better part of valour," no less!  This we learn in Punch, May 9, 1896.


> read more from The Right Word . . .


Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"My answer is simple: relationships.”

Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories in Context and Practice (2012)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


Pfft! (permalink)
"He waved a hand, made a pffft sound, told more."
Steve Ulfelder, The Whole Lie (2012)
* The British expression "noise stroke gesture" (in American parlance, "noise slash gesture" or "noise/gesture") refers to the intriguing fact that some vocal expressions seem to call for an accompanying hand gesture.  Take, for example, Pfft!  No matter what its intended meaning, it virtually demands to be echoed in sign language.  Have you noticed a pfft hand gesture in print?  Please share!

For a variety of surprising definitions of pfft, check out my Dictionary of All-Consonant Words at OneLetterWords.com.
> read more from Pfft! . . .

July 26, 2012

Precursors (permalink)
We discovered a precursor to the Oompa-Loompas of Chocolate Factory fame, dating all the way back to 1896 in Punch.


> read more from Precursors . . .


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"And apropos of nothing at all he adds, 'We are nice people. Not everyone understands that.'"
John McPhee, La Place de la Concorde Suisse
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .

July 25, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

We were honored to share with Kindred Spirit Magazine insights into our favorite mystical village, Portmeirion.  In particular, we expand on how Portmeirion's sunken gardens, sunken forests, and sunken boats constitute a shamanic otherworld, but one so-well marked and so well-lit that seekers can wander safely entranced.  Author Simon Wells, of The Rolling Stones: 365 Days and The Beatles: 365 Days fame, said of our travel guide, "Puzzling Portmeirion has detected a labyrinth of wonder and discovery that exists within the village’s many layers."
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but I haven't seen you looking this relaxed in years."
Jane Sigaloff, Lost & Found
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "Imagine studying your Plato . . ."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 24, 2012

Colorful Allusions (permalink)
We love this unspoken rainbow in Bananarama's song "Waterfall":

It's like a waterfall coming down
Your love it just shines through me like the sun

Similarly:

"You’ve painted time with an unspoken rainbow of gold." —T. Rue

In an amazing coincidence (or was it a coincidence?) our tech wizard friend Gordon (of Smart Home Hacks fame) sent us, without explanation, magic beads that turn color in sunlight -- an unspoken rainbow if we ever heard/saw one!  (See photo below.)

Meanwhile, did you know that "colored stripes of some description" is a Googlewhack?  For that matter, so is "mysterious colors in the air."


> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
Whimsical electrical poles then and now: the first image is from Punch, 1849, and the second is by Choi+Shine Architects (see photos of their stunning "The Land of Giants" electrical pylons on the Iceland landscape). Truly, "electricity dances in the air here" (Timothy Brown, Temple of the Troll God, 2001).



© 2011 Choi+Shine Architects.  This image appears here for historical commentary.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1870 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Do you see it?  The amulet?  There, there!"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 23, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We're pleased to reveal our new work on Platonic solids tumbling through time: Astragalomancy.  It's all about how to divine the meanings of 21 discrete dice throws.

Knowledge of ancient Greek divination rituals is unnecessary.  The simple interpretations are clear-cut, based upon specific, indisputable references to history, mathematics, literature, mythology, and arcane sciences from around the world.

Read more about about this work over at Amazon.com.


This illustration of Lady Luck appears in Punch, 1877.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Precursors (permalink)
Pecksniffery is the quality of being a pecksniffian (who who affects high moral principles).  The word comes to us via the gift of Charles Dickens' Martin Chuzzlewit, which features a character named Seth Pecksniff.

Yet while Merriam-Webster traces the first known use of pecksniffery to 1849, we can prove better.  We encountered the word (whimsically illustrated, no less!) in Punch, Vol. X, 1846, p. 149.  (We do what we can!)


> read more from Precursors . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This might surprise you ... but I'm a big fan of the local news."
Jessica Warman, Between
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1914 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "I had left Europe for no reason except to discover the sun, and there were rumors that he was to be found in Egypt."

Dedicated to Christopher Knowles.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 22, 2012

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"This should be the title of the autobiography of the human animal: The Dream Never Did Explain..."
William Keckler
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1870 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The doppelganger."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 21, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We were honored to consult on the Story Forge card deck for novelists, screenwriters, playwrights, and game masters.  The deck is a marvelous accomplishment -- intriguing, inspiring, and as useful as it is fun.  Every card is a steppingstone that illuminates and guides the writer toward the heart of his or her work.  Indeed, the deck could be likened to a treasure map torn into bits.  Each card offers clues, even as it invites us to detour to our heart's desire.  The deck is the perfect diversion for anyone with writer's block, since it offers an alternate route to bypass the blockage.

Pictured below, we drew "The Hidden" card: "Forces are reaching out from beyond the normal realm, attempting to intervene in mortal affairs for good or ill."  But check out the reversed meaning — we like it even better: "The Threshold: Someone is being drawn into other realms, beginning a voyage that largely takes place outside the normal world."  One neat thing about this card deck is that you're invited to cheat!  If you don't like a card, you get to draw another one.


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Indubitably (?) (permalink)
"Iceland is indubitably one of the most interesting spots on the face of the globe."*
The St. James's Magazine and United Empire Review (1862)
*If Merriam (or Webster?) is correct that indubitably is not the kind of word that gets used in everyday conversation, except perhaps for humorous effect, then insert comedy drum roll here.
> read more from Indubitably (?) . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1913 issue of Scribner's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

July 20, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We're pleased to announce our new guide to tracing your magical genealogy, entitled Heirs to the Queen of Hearts.



> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Pfft! (permalink)
"'Pffft.'  She waved away the distinction."
Leah Braemel, Hidden Heat (2012)
* The British expression "noise stroke gesture" (in American parlance, "noise slash gesture" or "noise/gesture") refers to the intriguing fact that some vocal expressions seem to call for an accompanying hand gesture.  Take, for example, Pfft!  No matter what its intended meaning, it virtually demands to be echoed in sign language.  Have you noticed a pfft hand gesture in print?  Please share!

For a variety of surprising definitions of pfft, check out my Dictionary of All-Consonant Words at OneLetterWords.com.
> read more from Pfft! . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1891 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "Christianity versus paganism.  The last fight."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 19, 2012

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"Someone should write a book: 'The Locker-Going Habits of the Eighth-Grade North American Boy.'"
Cathleen Daly, Flirt Club (2011)
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1872 issue of Harper's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 18, 2012

Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way—you seem like a great guy and all—but it's kind of odd that you just rolled up here, out of nowhere."
George Washington, A Game of Groans: A Sonnet of Slush and Soot
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Staring into the depths: an illustration from a 1901 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "He stared out into the blackness."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

July 17, 2012

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


For Jeff at Omegaword.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "Was it a beam of light that I saw in the pathway, touching the pallid bloom of the tall cosmos-flower?"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 16, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of The Strand magazine. 


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Shocking as it sounds, healthy skin doesn't really need any additional moisture."
Julie Gabriel, The Green Beauty Guide (2008)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

July 15, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1888 issue of Scribner's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of Scribner's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 14, 2012

Indubitably (?) (permalink)
"Consciousness manifests itself indubitably in man and therefore, glimpsed in this one flash of light, it reveals itself as having a cosmic extension and consequently as being aureoled by limitless prolongations in space and time."*
Frank Herbert & Bill Ransom, The Ascension Factor (1988)
*If Merriam (or Webster?) is correct that indubitably is not the kind of word that gets used in everyday conversation, except perhaps for humorous effect, then insert comedy drum roll here.
> read more from Indubitably (?) . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1875 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Then I sprang over the yawning chasm."

Jonathan quips, "Always bring your trombone when springing over yawning chasms!"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 13, 2012

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
After fully 27 years, a rhetorical question gets answered during the concert film A Diamond in the Mind.

Simon: [directing a lyric from the "The Reflex" to his keyboardist] "So why-y-y don't you use it?"
Nick: "I'm saving it for later."
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"What surprised us, and may surprise you now that you see it, is the amount of effort you spend protecting your 'I'm great' turf."
Tribal Leadership (2012)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A surrealist illustration from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "A tornado that lifted me off my feet and flung me headlong to the pavement."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 12, 2012

Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)

We say without irony that we suspected this all along:

"Symbolic fiction and spectral apparition are thus two sides of the same coin."
Slavoj Zizek, Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism (2012)
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1880 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The mystic ball of fire."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 11, 2012

Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but you sure seem different than when we spent all that time in Alaska."
Craig Odanovich, Hanging By a Thread
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Monsieur Bibi's boom-boom stepped out."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 10, 2012

Call it a Hunch (permalink)
"Call it a hunch.  You know, a five-letter word for feeling."
Debra Dixon, Bad to the Bone (2012)


A still from the classic Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .


Ampersands (permalink)
An illustration from an 1885 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "View East from Ampersand."


> read more from Ampersands . . .

July 9, 2012

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"Freud notes that ideas (and sometimes solutions to problems) seem to just pop into awareness apropos of nothing. Where do they come from? Where are such problems worked out?"
Frank Tallis, Hidden Minds: A History of the Unconscious (2012)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Ampersands (permalink)

"I wanted to be a vice president at a place with an ampersand."
Lee Nichols, Hand-Me-Down (2012)
* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .

July 8, 2012

Indubitably (?) (permalink)
"It is indubitably true that 'God is.'"*
The Historical Constitution of St. Bonaventure's Philosophy
*If Merriam (or Webster?) is correct that indubitably is not the kind of word that gets used in everyday conversation, except perhaps for humorous effect, then insert comedy drum roll here.
> read more from Indubitably (?) . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1883 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "The night's Plutonian shore."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 7, 2012

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
André Gide: an artist shouldn't recount his life exactly as he's lived it, but rather live it exactly as he is going to recount it.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1876 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "For the night deepens, and without the gate evil spirits hide and wait."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 6, 2012

A Rose is a ... (permalink)
"We say 'rose' and mean 'rose, because a rose is a rose is a rose.'  But the truth is that words really have no meaning that isn't socially constructed."
Rabbi Rami Shapiro, Writing, the Sacred Art (2012)


Photo by National Assembly For Wales / Cynulliad Cymru.
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Extinguishing a candle on a man's hat."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 5, 2012

Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but is it possible you don't want to fix it?"
Lissa Manley, Her Small-Town Sheriff
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1886 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Mary teaching Jesus the alphabet."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 4, 2012

It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"Since it bears repeating, let us say it again: you don't need to be ill to get help."
Getting the Best Out of College (2012)
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 3, 2012

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a vintage "Miss October," had Playboy been founded in 1895.  This illustration appeared in The Idler.


> read more from Precursors . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty in our life is that when time moves on it is forever lost."
Paramahamsa Nithyananda, Bhagavad Gita: Demystified (2011)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Hysterico Vaporous Hypo Megrins," a (fictional) diagnosis for a condition in which one is unstuck in time; the patient is lost to the present even as the future and the past loom up before his half-closed eyes.  This phrase appears in a poem entitled "Heroic Treatment," by a certain G.A.K., printed in Harper's New Monthly Magazine, vol. 75, Aug. 1887, p. 483.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 2, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We marvel today at the sorry state of the arts, but the Muses were suffering from exhaustion all the way back in 1892.  We find proof in The Idler.


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Leave it till tomorrow?  Tomorrow is today."
—Enrique Vila-Matas, Never Any End to Paris
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Pall Mall magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

July 1, 2012

Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
We were, of course, reminded of our Divination by Punctuation project when we encountered this percent sign in The Saturday Evening Post, 1909.


> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1887 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.