CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
August 31, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Dr. Boli shares brief anecdotes about remarkable animals, including a talented pigeon who can transform into a dove.  So very funny, as usual. 


Pigeon or dove?  Like Schrödinger's cat, it depends!
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1917 issue of Saturday Evening Post magazine.  The caption reads: "Do you not see its fearful eye staring at me through the wall?  Save me from it!"


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Hampton's magazine.  The caption reads: "We all know how corrupt and wicked city folks are."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 30, 2012

Precursors (permalink)
A precursor to Mad Magazine's Alfred E. Neuman?  From Everybody's Magazine, 1906.


> read more from Precursors . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"It may surprise you that the moon is included in your itinerary."
Foundations of Astronomy (2012)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "David's eyes were on the distance."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

August 29, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We're reading a bawdy farce of old-time radio (The Pleasure Dial by Jeremy Edwards), and the spectacles are one of the tools we use whenever we delve into material from (or set in) the past (to help filter and focus the mists of time, naturally).

What has us so delighted?  It's a passage in Chapter 22, involving imaginary water.  (Jeremy Edwards is the first author we've encountered who is witty enough to make a glass of water hilarious.)  Here are the lines, though we mustn't explain the context lest we ruin a plot twist:

The last time she’d been here, she’d been in the company of a Dada composer she was sleeping with, who wanted to see his sister carry a bucket across the stage in a rustic allegory. Not a memorable role for the poor young woman, who had not yet graduated to 'ingenue'; but to her credit she had not spilled a drop of the imaginary water, and Mariel had duly congratulated her.


> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This Pandora appears in a 1904 issue of Saturday Evening Post magazine.  The caption reads: "A common, battered tin box . . . but it held tragedy—more than tragedy."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"Our Higher Self is at all times there for us—a constant and eternal companion and the only certainty that we can count on."
Brigitte Arora, Transformation of the Human-Animal (2012)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1861 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Antelope in the mirage."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 28, 2012

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe that some of the things I discuss have been studied—I found it hard to believe myself at times—but rest assured that I am not simply making things up."
Andrew Trees, Decoding Love (2010)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


The Right Word (permalink)
Here's our video mash-up of They Might Be Giants' "Where Your Eyes Don't Go" + a favorite scene from the BBC comedy series Keeping Up Appearances.

> read more from The Right Word . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "She sat staring into the fire."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

August 27, 2012

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed X was a broken question mark.*

*as per Juan Felipe Herrera's Crash Boom Love: A Novel in Verse, 1999


> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
"'A rose is a rose is a rose' . . . doesn't actually hold true for different types of damask rose oils: rose otto is preferable over rose absolute as the former is not extracted using chemical solvents."
Stephanie Gailing, Planetary Apothecary (2012)


Photo by Zyada.
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .

August 26, 2012

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"It is surprising but true that many people are born with talent but are not aware of it themselves."
Gita Vittal, Reflections (2007)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Harper's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 25, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Animal, vegetable, or mineral?"  An illustration from a 1914 issue of Saturday Evening Post magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Life magazine.  The caption reads: "He centered his eye upon us."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 24, 2012

Precursors (permalink)
The internet isn't especially forthcoming about the origin of the "shoe tree" phenomenon.  But here's a precursor to the world's largest shoe tree (of Hawthrone, Nevada, callously felled by vandals in 2011).  This vintage shoe tree appears in Punch, 1848.


> read more from Precursors . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This might surprise you to hear me, of all people, say this -- we don't live in a courtroom, we live in the real world."
Matthew W. Grant, Zach's Secret
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of The Strand magazine.

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 23, 2012

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"Parenthetically, 'He must needs go whom the devil drives.'"
—John Hull, quoted in Francis J. Bremer's First Founders (2012)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "When I came back he was still staring at the water."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

August 22, 2012

A Rose is a ... (permalink)


Frames from Boardwalk Empire.
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This illustration of a coffee octopus (or, er, quintopus?) is from a 1901 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "School teacher.  Pulled down hill."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 21, 2012

Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but the ballet world seems almost cultish."
Sophie Flack, Bunheads
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .


Phosphenes (permalink)
An illustration from an 1853 issue of Harper's magazine (vol. 7, p. 573).  The caption reads: "Appearance of things in general to a gentleman who has just turned a complete somersault.  * &c., &c., Represent Sparks of Divers Beautiful Colors."


> read more from Phosphenes . . .

August 20, 2012

Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple. 'Do not be anxious about anything.'”

Ajith Fernando, An Authentic Servant (2012)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This serpent wrangler is from an 1883 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "They were hard at work worshiping me."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 19, 2012

Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1864 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Soft shineth the moon."


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1912 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "I'm going to the moon, because that's where you and me came from."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 18, 2012

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Surprising, but true ... just as the individual life must reimagine the lost worlds of its childhood, so the collective life of even the modern world itself is built out of, and requires, a retelling of stories of its collective parts."
Charles Lemert, Social Things: An Introduction to the Sociological Life (2011)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Life magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

August 17, 2012

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"'Now you'll have something to write about,' she said one afternoon in the kitchen, apropos of nothing, talking without talking at all about the terrible thing that was happening to her as, instead, a terrible thing that was happening to me."
Anna Quindlen, Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake (2012)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1919 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "It took him less than ten minutes to reduce the trunk to a mass of splinters."

Dedicated to Teresa Burritt.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 16, 2012

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by and dedicated to Jeff Hawkins.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Staring at the Sun (permalink)
An illustration from a 1911 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "He turned and faced the rising sun, the light full on his face."


> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .

August 15, 2012

This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of Pall Mall magazine.  The caption reads: "She cautiously ventured one foot into the black-looking water."


   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"It is a curious thought, but it is only when you see people looking ridiculous that you realize just how much you love them."
Agatha Christie

(via FutilityCloset)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 14, 2012

Something, Defined (permalink)

The entirety of history: "nothing, something, something, something, maybe something, nothing, something, something, something, something and not at once, something, something, assuredly there must be something, nothing." —William Keckler
> read more from Something, Defined . . .


Indubitably (?) (permalink)


This screen shot, showing the "Tunnel of Love, Indubitably," is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
*If Merriam (or Webster?) is correct that indubitably is not the kind of word that gets used in everyday conversation, except perhaps for humorous effect, then insert comedy drum roll here.
> read more from Indubitably (?) . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1910 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "There was a whir of wheels in the air, a lurch into space."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 13, 2012

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We have a homemade lie detector.  We state the following propositions, the participant thinks yes or no, and the machine's red or green bulbs light up the answer:
  1. Your wish is that I wish what you secretly wish.
  2. Within a two-hour period, you have eaten an amount of food that most people would consider excessive.
  3. You've ruled out the possibility that you're being overly suspicious.
  4. You know who she is and she knows what she is.
  5. That time you said you loved the chocolate cake, you threw up a little in your mouth.
  6. The fact that you tend to stay up through the hours of darkness has nothing to do with a craving for blood.
  7. When you lie you break out in a rash.
  8. You pray to be forgiven for doing that thing with the thing.
  9. There's just no explaining that whatchamacallit.
  10. You secretly dream of waking up as a Canadian.
  11. Maybe it's time to stop not doing what you pretended you can do and can't, and start doing the thing that you can't do but can no longer pretend that you can.
  12. Your secret desire is my deepest fear.
  13. You can't listen to very much Wagner because you start getting the urge to conquer Poland.
  14. You're so busy with work that you don't have time to "give back to society.”
  15. You have neither the money nor the know-how to get that thingamajig out of your head.
  16. You've ruled out deranged psychopathy and decided it sounds like fun.
  17. Nobody knows what you carry about with you in your pocket.
  18. No one will ever suspect that you have the whatsit in your possession.
  19. Your secret desire is to bust out that straw-cowboy-hat-and-flip-flops look without looking out of place.
  20. You have drunk champagne out of the slipper of a dancing girl.
  21. You want to live better than you do now and work fewer hours.
  22. You did not mean what you said that day we parted.
  23. You have a playroom all to yourself.
  24. You want to found a new religion.
  25. Though talkative and often high-strung, your secret desire is to be with someone to whom you don't have to say a word, someone whose eyes are hypnotic and whose arms are soothing and strong.
  26. You secretly dream of being in front of the camera.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed I read the great American novel.


From Puck, 1884.
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"Though I just said it, it bears repeating: take it easy."
Tara Stiles, Yoga Cures (2012)
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .

August 12, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1869 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Specture of the Brocken."

For Martha Brockenbrough.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1911 issue of Scribner's magazine.  The caption reads: "It was perhaps a little past the third hour after midnight....He stretched both hands across the table...and whispered a name."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 11, 2012

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Neither Darwin nor Dawkins, neither science nor philosophy, has explained how an irreducibly complex system such as a watch might be produced without a designer."
Michael J. Behe, Darwin's Black Box (2001)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1920 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Dropping their H's."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 10, 2012

The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty is that exceptions occur."
Rand Wilcox, Modern Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences (2011)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1861 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "Captain Toby runs to save the vinegar."

Dedicated to Jonathan.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 9, 2012

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
Everybody's doing this now—even ghosts.  From Rhyme? and Reason? by Lewis Carroll, 1884.  The caption reads, "And swing yourself from side to side."

(For Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.)


> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .


Indubitably (?) (permalink)
"YOU are indubitably the most important person you will ever meet in your world, in your lifetime.  No one nor anything will ever have as much impact or influence on YOU as YOU."*
Jeanne Dolphus Cotton, Getting It Together: You, Life and Living (1995)


Photo by Matthew Allard.
*If Merriam (or Webster?) is correct that indubitably is not the kind of word that gets used in everyday conversation, except perhaps for humorous effect, then insert comedy drum roll here.
> read more from Indubitably (?) . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Scribner's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

August 8, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Did you know that the phrase "Nothing or a duck's egg" is a Googlewhack?  From Punch, 1877.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
Everybody's doing this now.  From Life, 1918.


> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .


Precursors (permalink)
The first image is from the exceptionally witty British panel show "Would I Lie To You?"  It depicts Greg Davies' "Hoot Owl Death Sign," from a schoolboy prank (or was it?)  The second image is from Appleton's magazine, 1905: "He had discovered the death-emblem."



> read more from Precursors . . .

August 7, 2012

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
Everybody's doing this now.  From Life, 1918.


> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .


Precursors (permalink)
The precursor to the crop circle was the crop pentagram.  (For evidence, see Scientific American, April 9, 1864.)


> read more from Precursors . . .


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This might surprise you, but these alabaster marvels are dentures."
Lisa Lutz, Heads You Lose
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .

August 6, 2012

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
Everybody's doing this now:  an illustration from a 1913 issue of Green Book magazine. 


> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


Inspired by and dedicated to Jeff Hawkins.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 5, 2012

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Surprisingly, it turns out that any statement about all elements of an empty set is true. This rule is called vacuous truth."
Algorithms and Data Structures: The Science of Computing (2004)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Scribner's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

August 4, 2012

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"Someone should write a book and fill every page with the credo, Don't drop the soap."
Terra Little, Jump (2011)
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1874 issue of Harper's magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 3, 2012

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Out of context, it appears that everyone is expecting the man with a beard and turban to initiate contact with the Beyond.  The caption reads: "Why not try the long-distance telephone?"  This fakir's no faker!  From The Saturday Evening Post, 1911.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1893 issue of Pall Mall magazine.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .

August 2, 2012

Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
Our daily "Music Box Moment" features a baker's dozen new tracks.  Through the delicate workings of the music box, even the most dramatic compositions seem to play only for you.  You’ll hear even a very familiar piece in a whole new way.  Courtesy of home recording pioneer Ken Clinger, we now feature Handel's "Flute Sonata #7," three movements of Mozart's "Piano Sonata 11," Weiss' "Air," four movements of Chopin's "Piano Sonata 1," Zielenski's "Fantazja II," Saint-Saens' "Rondo," Zach's "Praeludium & Fuga," and Wartecki's "Nos Autem Gloriari Oportet."

Here's the link to the music box.  It makes a great bookmark!


Photo by Bart Heird.
> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
"A mystery and a trick are generally two sides of the same object, according as it is turned to the view of the beholder."
The Works of Robert Hall


> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1879 issue of Harper's magazine.


[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .

August 1, 2012

Precursors (permalink)
Our friend at Frog Blog found a precursor to our own highly controversial atlas of blank maps.


> read more from Precursors . . .


It's Really Happening (permalink)
"If it's really happening, a series of things is going to happen."
Jim Moorhead, The Instant Survivor (2012)


A collage in honor of the comedy "happening" Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of The Strand magazine.  The caption reads: "Small interposed it in time to save his head."


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.