CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Featured Book
The Young Wizard's Hexopedia
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Cautious or Optimistic
King of Hearts of War and Peace
As I Was, As I Am
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
How to Believe in Your Elf
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Miscellanies of Mr. Jonathan
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Non-Circulating Books
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Answers, Questioned
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
What's In a Name
Yearbook Weirdness
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

Magic Words
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
Martha Brockenbrough
Gordon Meyer
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Phantasmaphile
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
Ironic Sans
Brian Sibley's Blog
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
October 31, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1894 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A pipe smoking black cat and its witchy familiar fly on a broomstick under cover of chimney smoke. An illustration from an 1860 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1863 issue of Punch magazine.  This should also be of interest: How to Be Your Own Cat.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 30, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Rival Moons": an illustration from a 1912 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
We've heard the nursery rhyme about the old woman who lived in a shoe, but here's an old witch who commutes in one.  From Punch, 1860.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it difficult to believe that you are dead because you feel very much alive."
Diane Goble, How to Die Consciously
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 29, 2013

This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
Dr. Boli notes that "feral water is dangerously unstable.  It has been estimated that more than 50% of the damage in so-called natural disasters is caused by water in an uncontrolled state.  Feral water can destroy buildings and ravage landscapes.  It is a documented fact that feral water, in sufficient quantities, can kill."
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Very Thing": an illustration from an 1884 issue of Lett's Illustrated Household magazine.

[For Jonathan Caws-Elwitt, for reasons too complicated to summarize easily.]
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)

From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

There are two sides to every issue, and twelve gray facets.

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 28, 2013

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"Maybe politeness is the same as sarcasm.  Someone should write that book.  Against Politeness."
Tao Lin, Eeeee Eee Eeee: A Novel
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Eleusinian Mysteries: an illustration from Family (1834).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may be quite surprised at how rapidly children grow and require new clothing and astonished at the number of their social activities."
Therese A. Rando, How To Go On Living When Someone You Love Dies (1991)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 27, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
If it's the last dance, let it be with a goat.  From an 1870 issue of London Society Illustrated magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Populated by the grandmothers of baseball stars: "American's greatest graveyard."  From Puck, 1907.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 26, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This ominous sphinx appears in Puck, 1883.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 25, 2013

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)

To our utter delight, Dr. Menachem Feuer analyzes our Franzlations according to Schlemiel Theory.  Here's just a snippet:

They have created a book that speaks to anyone who is interested not just in reading Kafka but in, so to speak, taking his work as the basis for new texts, images, and interpretations that "open” up the text to play and new meaning. Moreover, this book speaks to people who are well versed in what is called "intertextuality.” And by this I mean the textual practice of moving between texts which, in effect, offers new meanings (I will return to this below).

But I would argue that since Franzlations also includes images, one text doesn’t simply translate into another; it also translates a text into another image (or rather a set of images which harken back to the early 20th century). By doing this, this book takes the work of Kafka into a wholly other sphere of meaning with an entirely different register of connotations. And for someone like myself, who loves textual play, this is doubly exciting. It brings us into the zone where Walter Benjamin, in his book Berlin Childhood around 1900, wanted to go; namely, to a space where the imagination can be freed by virtue of the play of images, text, and history. In this space, one becomes like a man-child, interpreting text, images, and history while at the same time playing with them. This touches on depths by way of traveling across different surfaces.

I’d like to take a look at the interplay between text and text and text and (historical) image to illustrate how these texts open up horizons that I have not experienced in any previous academic readings or fictional plays on Kafka’s novels, short stories, or parables (as in Phillip Roth, Paul Celan, or Aharon Appelfeld’s work—to mention only a few examples of writers who engage in intertextuality with Kafka’s work).

> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"There is a point where the proud waves of the sea must be stopped."
Richard Polwhele, Traditions and Recollections, 1826
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of The Critic magazine.  This should also be of interest: How to Be Your Own Cat.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
"A rose is a continuation of the rosebush" [just as one is a continuation of one's mother]. —You Are Here: Discovering the Magic of the Present Moment (2010)

World's largest rosebush by peppergrasss.
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 24, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1884 issue of Penny Post magazine.  The caption reads: "Look through these glasses in order."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Only Funny If ... (permalink)
Chicken Road It "would only be funny if it hadn't been done before."
Michael Dalton Johnson, Top Dog Sales Secrets (2007)
> read more from Only Funny If ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"'When a sloth dies, it remains hanging in its tree,' the sloth said, apropos of nothing."
Lev Grossman, The Magician King (2011)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 23, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Enjoy a safe Scorpio period: don't let the scorpions get your Achilles heel.  From Lightsome, and the Little Golden Lady by Charles Henry Bennett (1867).

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Puck magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe but I was once like you."
—Polly Teale's dramatization of Jane Eyre (1999)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 22, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A mermaid, or technically "a wriggler sarpint of old Nile" [sic], from Punch, 1892.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Charlie ... gestured with his head to the letter."
S. L. Richardson, All The Way (2008)

The illustration of the giant letter P is from Punch, 1857.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 21, 2013

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
Here's the secret of dying happily, courtesy of E. V. Lucas, Windfall's Eve (1930):

Keep on altering your will.  Every time you alter it, you make it more amusing and thus become the more ready to pop off in order that the joke may begin.  It's infallible.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Why new houses are haunted": an illustration from an 1886 issue of London Society Illustrated magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Asking for help finding a kitten.  "That's the oldest trick in the book."
Marlene Perez, Dead Is Not an Option (2011)
> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 20, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of Puck magazine.  The caption reads: "The superstition of modern Drug worship."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
How is a paint-worthy subject like an airpane exit hatch?  Sometimes the nearest one is behind you.  In this illustration by Frank Haviland for The Bystander (1906), the artist is blissfully unaware that he has a half-human sea creature for a critic.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 19, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of The Bystander magazine.  The caption reads: "And the damned grotesques danced arabesques."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
These mermaids appear in Punch, 1899.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 18, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)

Sheila in Binghamton (not pictured) writes:

I ran across this supposedly Jamaican saying "Empty cans mek de most noise!"  I believe V8 cans make more noise than any others.  What would Prof Oddfellow say?

Yes, Shelia!  Empty V8 cans absolutely do make more noise.  In layman's terms, a container that was once filled with eight juices is emptier than a container filled with a single juice.  In mathematical terms, negative eight is less than zero.  In Buddhist terms, emptiness is a boundless space of resonance.  (Note that the low sodium variety of V8, containing what Samuel Beckett didn't call "more lessness," makes the most noise of all.)

But here is a warning: do not, for acoustical purposes, seek to make your own V8 juice in a jar (as did Rachel McLeod Laminer, pictured), unless the noise you seek is that of breaking glass.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"Someone should write a big book about translation ... from Humboldt to today.  If you take a closer look, you soon realize that ultimately translation doesn't exist.  And suddenly you're caught in a trap."
Ingo Schulze, New Lives (2008)
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Putnam's magazine.  The caption reads: "Others mailed themselves, all stamped."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 17, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1865 issue of Mrs. Grundy magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The fairies who make words stick in your head.  An illustration from an 1890 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
"Wouldn't it be loverly" to have a room somewhere "with one enormous chair"?  That's what Eliza dreamed of in My Fair Lady (1956), though rooms with enormous chairs go back at least as far as 1865, as we see in Punch:

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 16, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
Before "snail mail" there was "butterfly mail," as we see in the sixth season of Bewitched.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Open Sesame": an illustration from an 1874 issue of London Society Illustrated magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe that a starched shirt can feel comfortable. Well, now you can believe it!"
Ebony (Feb. 1986)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 15, 2013

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"'You can never be too careful,' he said apropos of nothing, and smacked his lips." —Laurie Fox, The Lost Girls (2011)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1865 issue of Mrs. Grundy magazine.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
Here are two strange incarnations of tamed cockatrice-like animals, each partially equine.  The first appears in a child's nightmare (Punch, 1865).  The second is ridden by a knife-wielding adult in broad daylight (Punch, 1858).


If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 14, 2013

Puzzles and Games (permalink)
The problem with this puzzle we encountered is that the blank dominoes aren't missing values at all.  Zero is a real number which quantifies a count or an amount of null size.

> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
An illustration from an 1882 issue of Frank Leslie's Sunday magazine.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)
 "'Honeysuckle,' he said, apropos of nothing but the night air."
Grace Burrowes, The Heir (2010)

[See also our previous bit regarding somebody else's honeysuckle.]

Honeysuckle by Vickysaurus.
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 13, 2013

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1918 issue of Cartoons magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"How happy he who crowns, in shades like these." —Oliver Goldsmith

The illustration appears in Punch, 1892.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 12, 2013

Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from an 1887 issue of Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly magazine.  The caption reads: "Out into a world of such wild whitening beauty as is seldom seen."
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A surrealist illustration from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "I saw the shadow of an enormous foot and felt a rush of air."

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 11, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"If you persist in being self-sufficient, you may be quite surprised when your partner leaves you, citing his or her reason as, 'You don't need me.'"
Tracy Lewis, Living Life Consciously (2009)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "The filthy coils wind round my hips like a boa-constrictor's."
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 10, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
To avoid performing an ordinary social duty or otherwise excuse a breach of civility, merely say:

I'm terribly sorry; I know it's wrong of me; but honestly I can't help it.  You see, I'm a bit mad.  [Then add, with a half-wistful, half-triumphant air,] There's madness in my family, you know.  —E. V. Lucas, Windfall's Eve (1930)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Putnam's magazine.  The caption reads: "This patch of blue must go into the sky somewhere."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Thirty-three years before Anton Chekhov's "Gooseberries," in which he likened a far-off train to a crawling caterpillar, this caterpillar train appeared in Punch (1865).

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 9, 2013

This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"I think the sea's awful, I do, the way it throws people together." —E. V. Lucas, Down the Sky
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from She by Henry Rider Haggard.  The caption reads: "Curse her!  May she be everlastingly accursed!"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe, but the last thing I want is to inherit a title tainted by the suspicion that I murdered the previous holder to gain it."
Shirlee Busbee, Rapture Becomes Her (2011)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 8, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1909 issue of Putnam's magazine.  The caption reads: "'Keep us under your shadow,' she whispered."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1889 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
These cruel insects (butterfly fairies?) are killing a wasp in Punch, 1865.

"A natural enmity, attacking and tearing each other with the cruelty of insects." —Graphis: Volume 8 (1958)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 7, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"For every magician who plucks a coin or card out of thin air, some cohort has to send a coin or card back into that air!"
—Larry Thornton, "A Brief Dissertation Plucked out of Thin Air"

[Thanks, Gordon!]
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Only Funny If ... (permalink)
Chicken Road "Hey, man, this would only be funny if it happened to you."
Wild Women/Wild Horses: Double Delights (2004)
> read more from Only Funny If ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Yesterday's weather played havoc with skirts a la mode." —Robert Elliott Gonzales, Poems and Paragraphs, 1918.

The illustration is from an 1856 issue of Harper's magazine.  The caption reads: "What it must come to."
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 6, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1891 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Uncle Fusby gives another delightful lecture."  From Punch, 1866.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 5, 2013

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
The patron saint of bad ideas exists.
Things That Exist

Statue holding a barely-flickering lightbulb by Electroburger.

Burned-out lightbulb votive by tehbieber.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's a quiet reading nook for the children (nothing too ostentatious), from Punch, 1865.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 4, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)

"We can't see peels of thunder because they're the same color as the sky, so they blend in."
Jeff Hawkins

Not that we didn't trust him, but we sought to corroborate Mr. Hawkins' assertion.  In Frances Hodgson Burnett's T. Tembarom (1913), we find verification that purplish-gray is "the color of thunder" (p. 273).

> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Book of Whispers (permalink)
"Here is My Secret.  It’s quite simple: One sees clearly only with the heart.  Anything essential is invisible to the eyes." —Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

The eye of the heart, by Quinn Dombrowski.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
"Everywhere, all the time, a barrage of scrambled images assaults us -- disjointed scenes, outlandish mergers. ... But by now we have little trouble reading or understanding this new visual lingo. ... We have already had our homework done for us by Picasso." —Life, "The Power of Picasso," Dec. 27 1968

One hundred years earlier, a proto-Picasso debuted in Punch (1860).
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 3, 2013

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)

Photo courtesy of Fire at Will.
Someone should write a book entitled How to Talk to Your Children About Slap Bass.

(Inspired by Things That Exist.)
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Nothing is interesting save to see what happens next." —John Cowper Powys, Porius
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
We had a moment of panic when we saw this illustration (in Punch, 1860), fearing that peanut butter and jelly were more like Taylor & Burton and less like Brad & Angelina.  But then we realized it was jam on the receiving end of jelly's right hook (if our boxing terminology is up to snuff).  

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 2, 2013

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
I think someone should write a book and call it Women Men Never Approach in the First Place.
Rene Foss, Around the World in a Bad Mood (2012)
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
"Funny that my dreams can so powerfully influence my waking life, while my waking life has so little influence over my dreams." —Jeff Hawkins

[Previously on this very subject.]

Meanwhile:

A waking vision of a dream elephant, from Boys and Girls Bookshelf (1920).

A night visitor from Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine (1885).
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe and certainly paradoxical, but permitting yourself 20 minutes a day to do nothing but rest and relax may be the most productive time you have spent in years!"
Harriet B. Braiker, The Disease to Please: Curing the People-Pleasing Syndrome (2002)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

October 1, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"I know some guys that, though hard to believe ... completely respect and support me and my surfing." —Hillary Carlip, Girl Power (2001)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Colorful Allusions (permalink)
"It's this October softening the burning sun that fills the air with a new element, an element like a great melted pearl, through which you see everything." —John Cowper Powys, Porius

Our illustration is a collage of elements by spettacolopuro, amboo who?, and Iguanasan.
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Oh overflowing cask, you give drink and fill to drunkenness every loving desire. You give joy and illumine all our understanding" (Catherine of Siena, 1347-1380, qtd. in An Anthology of Christian Mysticism by Harvey D. Egan).

The keg/cask/hogshead imps appear in Punch, 1860.  The spigot fairy appears in Fairies and Folk of Ireland by William Henry Frost, 1900.

This should also be of interest: How to Believe in Your Elf.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest



Page 0 of 911



Original Content Copyright © 2017 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.