CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
March 31, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
"Hiding the babies": a precursor to the Easter egg hunt?  From A Pair of Originals by Evelyn Everett-Green (1891).

> read more from Precursors . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1922 issue of The Delineator magazine, proving that Easter was a bigger holiday in times past.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple: people like other people who evoke a pleasant emotional response in them; they like to be around people who make them feel good, safe and comfortable.”

Elize Hattin, The Naked Truth About You (2011)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .
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March 30, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "An Indian 'Sherlock Holmes.'"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of Wide World magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 29, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
Did you know that the classic sitcom Bewitched's biggest feat of magic was turning its entire audience into practitioners of modern witchcraft?  It all happens in episode two (1964), with a clever set-up and a breaking of the fourth wall.  We begin with the witchy mother Endora deciding to get a look at her new son-in-law without him seeing her:



The son-in-law senses an invisible presence and asks, "Who's here in this room with us?":



In the final scene of episode two, Endora breaks the fourth wall and addresses the audience directly.  Indeed, we've been invisibly eavesdropping on the household along with Endora, and it's fitting that she looks right at us -- her fellow witches, floating in the air alongside her at roof-level.



And may we add, what better place to break the fourth wall than on the roof!
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
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Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook, for the author of The Can of Yams:

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Strange Dreams (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "From An Ultimate Dim Thule. (A Record of Dreams.) By S.H. Sime.  'I sat on the back of the Oonrouff-Wuff: he paused: sadness overcame him as he gazed fixedly into the fourth dimension and his tears dropped into the abyss.  Then another Brain-cell broke, and something else became me.'"
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
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March 28, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The text reads, "Outside of the cow of our knowledge.  Inspired by Gary Barwin."
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Courtesy of literary scalawag Jonathan Caws-Elwitt:

"What the Dickens-comma-Charles do you think you're doing!"

Here's our rendition of a Dickens comma:
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1919 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "My glance drifted to the wall above it, and, horror of horrors I saw it distinctly bulge inwards!"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 27, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
An invisible moon, whether hidden by clouds or by a film of vapor or by the horizon itself, is "possessed of the power to substitute a totally different element as a darkness disperser from that of either daylight or torchlight" —John Cowper Powys, Porius.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1894 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "Is this a bottled ghost?"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you: Peanuts aren't technically nuts!"
Eating Clean For Dummies (2011)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
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March 26, 2013

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt gleefully adds to the misquotation epidemic:

> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "Shadowy forms seemed to be dancing round it."

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Metropolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "I walked through the wall before his amazed eyes, and walked back again."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 25, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The text reads: So many mysterious gravitations in me; so few explanations ... [unless you're a butterfly]. —Jeff Hawkins
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Midnight Oil:  an illustration from an 1899 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 24, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "He poured some fine powder."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1908 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "A large blackbird dashed its wings against the window."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 23, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A parrot as a medium:  an illustration from a 1906 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "'Are there any spirits here to-night?' asked the butler."  This should be of interest: Seance Parlor Feng Shui.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1908 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "It was going, and—I fired, and then fired again."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 22, 2013

The Right Word (permalink)
Is there a name for the phenomenon of one language being identified but another being transcribed?  For example:

"'You are going to kill him?' she cried in German."  (From The Man Who-Couldn't Sleep by Arthur Stringer.)

And: "[Men speaking Spanish] Last night I had an ugly nightmare."


> read more from The Right Word . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "He began to sling the whole French language at me."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1898 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 21, 2013

Strange Dreams (permalink)
Ken shares a dream that we're honored to figure into:

I woke up and looked at the clock. It was 8:50 AM. My daily class started at 8:30, so I wondered why the alarm hadn't gone off. I looked at another clock, but the hands were all scrunched up in one corner of the clock face. Then I realized that I could float in the air, and was excited because I was fully conscious and would be able to remember it to tell Craig Conley.

I floated around from room to room, looking for something to"test". But everything was normal, other than the fact I was floating in the air.

I floated down to my other bedroom in the opposite corner of that floor of the house. The bed there was a single mattress on the floor, with a burgundy bedspread. I noticed how it matched the burgundy carpet on the floor. I floated over to the desk and looked for some object to take back to my other bedroom, to prove I'd actually physically transported something via floating. I had two black clay Incan figures, and so took one of them. When I picked it up, the head fell off, and I remembered that it had previously been cracked. I tried to remember if I had any glue in my other bedroom, to fix it.

I then floated back towards my other bedroom, and was still trying to come up with some "test" to try out, to tell Craig about. I floated over to a wall to see if I could float thru it, but it was completely solid. So I just floated back to the bed where I'd woken up.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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It Bears Repeating (permalink)
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .
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March 20, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Spring shoos winter off a cliff, along with its cold remedies, heating appliances, heavy coats and barren branches.  From Puck, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "I'd make a better phantom with a sheet and a turnip."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple: They just are. Their brain[s are] hardwired to be that way.”

The Everything Parent's Guide to Raising a Gifted Child (2012)

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .
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March 19, 2013

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt gleefully adds to the misquotation epidemic:

> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Cats' Ghosts":  an illustration from an 1895 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)

An exclamation mark from Life, 1912.
I dreamed about a mouse.
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .
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March 18, 2013

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
First the good news:

We just noticed a lovely review of One-Letter Words: A Dictionary, courtesy of Virginia Durksen over at Goodreads: "What's not to love? I confess to being a reader of dictionaries. Not a regular reader, but a frequent browser, when the sun is shining and a word has caught my eye. Conley pulls together a list—this inspires more lists in me. I want to add things to this dictionary. The publisher should create a volume with spaces to add things, for word collectors. And, goodreads should add an option for re-reading, never stop reading, use it all the time. That would be this book."

But it's not all good news.  An unrefined person over at Goodreads ripped our dictionary of one-letter words 26 new anal cavities.  (Googling "does a book have an anus?" delivers zero results, so ours may be a world first!)  Forget the fact that our dictionary has been remaindered for years and was, in fact, dead in the marketplace before it ever debuted (see our interview with Janet Boyer for the lurid backstory).  Why condemn when you can create?  This gauche person stated that he's pretty sure he could do a better job.  So why doesn't he?  The more dictionaries of one-letter words, the better!  But actual creators and innovators are few and far between.  We don't have time to write paragraphs of derision toward other people's work -- we're too busy marching to rain on someone else's parade.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "Mr. Presterton seemed to be swelling."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This auroral priestess, the "Siren of the Pole," appears in The Idler, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1907 issue of The Windsor magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 17, 2013

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
Thanks, poet rob mclennan, for saying that our Franzlations "read like an illustrated translation or even continuation of Kafka’s work. ... The three authors work absurd movement, incredible wisdom and clarity, reading nearly as an extended essay-as-response on the work of Franz Kafka."
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "'The transmigration of souls,' he said, 'is now no longer a puzzle to me.'"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1896 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "Waiter, this Gorgonzola has eaten all my bread!"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 16, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1897 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "The shelves are choked with Portuguese cyclopaedias."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"But wait!"  A detail of a comic strip from Life, 1920.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 15, 2013

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)

"When the mood is in the seventh house ..." —Jeff Hawkins
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to a Hitler imitation:  an illustration from an 1892 issue of The Idler magazine.
> read more from Precursors . . .
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A Rose is a ... (permalink)
"A rose is a rose whether it's alive or wilted."
Hexin E McPhee, A Vision of Love (2011)
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
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March 14, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

 
The text reads: "There's the vein within which flows the blood of kings, the heart that beats a reign of truth and honor, the lungs that breathe free fire. —Tom Howe"
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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The Right Word (permalink)
Surely the word like in this caption alerts a figure of speech, but we do respect an adventurer who recoils from exaggeration.  The illustration is from The Wide World Magazine, 1899.

> read more from The Right Word . . .
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March 13, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

The text reads: "If I rattle this poem a little I can hear, though still too faintly, the sound of an ocean unfurling itself over a layer of pebbles in many colors. —Geof Huth"
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 12, 2013

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)

The text reads: "You know my method.  It is founded upon the observation of trifles. —Sir Arthur Conan Doily."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"What Followed a Knock":  an illustration from an 1892 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Cupid as the Devil's ventriloquist dummy, from Life, 1920.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 11, 2013

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Q: Why does Indiana have the fewest panhandlers?
A: Beggars can't be Hoosiers.

Q: What area of the United States has the most panhandlers?
A: The Florida panhandle, followed by the Oklahoma panhandle.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1920 issue of Life magazine.  The caption reads: "The house haunters' union decides to strike for a four-hour night."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
"It may surprise you to learn that you also work during recess and at lunch."
Put Screws to the Test (2011)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
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March 10, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
Twenty years before George Vernon Hudson proposed daylight saving time, Father Time advanced the clock in Father Time's Story Book by Kathleen Knox (1873).

> read more from Precursors . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1893 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 9, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
Like the moon landing, all those devastatingly beautiful photos of the moon are faked, too.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1918 issue of Life magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 8, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook, inspired by Jeff Hawkins:

The text reads: "The 'humble fork' does not refer to any dessert utensil.  Dainty forks are servile to no one."
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Down Express":  an illustration from a 1901 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This might surprise you: It's not always easy."
Lorraine Jean Hopping, The Body as Evidence
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
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March 7, 2013

A Fine Line Between... (permalink)

"There is a fine line between showing off and displaying a mental ability that is interesting and entertaining." —Chuck Hickok, Mentalism, Incorporated
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "I walked right off the train."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A surrealist illustration from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "The great sphere I recognized after closer scrutiny as an orange."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 6, 2013

Always Remember (permalink)
"Always remember that with a multiple-choice question you are looking at the right answer!"
Barron's Florida Real Estate Exams

Photo by RiftGallery.
> read more from Always Remember . . .
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Book of Whispers (permalink)

 
A giraffe whispers the secret to a bunny in Life, 1921.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .
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Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Look, don't take this the wrong way, but can I suggest you get out of those clothes?"
John Simpson, Beach House
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .
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March 5, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The text reads, "Like gingivitis, the root of sustainable agriculture lies just below the gumline. —Jeff Hawkins."
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"How an Eagle Carried Off the Baby": an illustration from a 1900 issue of Wide World magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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The Right Word (permalink)
"Do you always read in the original French?"
"Yes, translations are so indecent."

From Life Magazine, 1922.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
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March 4, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"No one is to be blamed for all this horror except everybody and everything."
John Cowper Powys, Porius
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1895 issue of The Idler magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Simple Answers (permalink)
Difficult Question? Here's a simple answer

"The answer is simple: we don't have the time to make people guess what we want to tell them.”

—Nancy Graham Holm

If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .
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March 3, 2013

Strange Dreams (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of The Idler magazine.  The caption reads: "I didn't think it was kind of you to spoil a beautiful dream."
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Life magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 2, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Ouija: an illustration from a 1920 issue of Life magazine.  This should be of interest: The Care & Feeding of a Spirit Board.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's a 46-ton potato eaten at sea, from Harmsworth Magazine, 1899.  It is followed by another extraordinary potato, from The Tin Drum.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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March 1, 2013

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Did you hear the one about the Buddhist Luddites?  They sit in the dark to save ohms.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Wide World magazine.  The caption reads: "She remained standing mute as a statue, pointing with her finger towards me."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A rip in the lining."  A detail of a comic strip from Life, 1920.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Original Content Copyright © 2017 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.