CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
June 30, 2013

Always Remember (permalink)
"Never forget that you learn to climb mountains by climbing."
Frank C. McClelland, Office Training and Standards (1919)

"Or by taking the stairs."
—Prof. Oddfellow

Photo by lacitadelle.
> read more from Always Remember . . .
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Strange Dreams (permalink)
"I had been dreaming a crowded dream full of unfamiliar characters—people I hadn't had time, or whom it hadn't seemed necessary, to name or even make distinct from one another.  It was a mob, practically, but its intent was unclear.  For what purpose had they congregated?" —Rebecca Wolff, The Beginners (2011)

This depiction of a crowded dream is from Punch, 1893.

If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
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June 29, 2013

Always Remember (permalink)
"Always remember that all fires are the same size at the start."
A Manual of Fire Department Equipment and Practice

Photo by Cali4beach.
> read more from Always Remember . . .
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
"I'd say you've earned it, quite surprisingly."
Zoraida Cordova, Vicious Deep (2012)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
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June 28, 2013

It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"Men!  They all the same, if they're not doing it, they're talking about it."  A still from Dear Ladies, series one.

> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)

Joseph Clark, The Famous Posture-Master, depicted in The Book of Wonderful Characters: Memoirs and Anecdotes of Remarkable and Eccentric Persons in all Ages and Countries, Chiefly from the Text of Henry Wilson and James Caulfield, 1869.  Image via Bibliodyssey.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"The truly creative mind in any field is no more than this: A human creature born abnormally, inhumanly sensitive. To him ... a touch is a blow, a sound is a noise, a misfortune is a tragedy, a joy is an ecstasy, a friend is a lover, a lover is a god, and failure is death.  Add to this cruelly delicate organism the overpowering necessity to create, create, create -- so that without the creating of music or poetry or books or buildings or something of meaning, his very breath is cut off from him. He must create, must pour out creation.  By some strange, unknown, inward urgency he is not really alive unless he is creating." —Pearl S. Buck

Photo by Chris Carella.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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June 27, 2013

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"Write a novel about a young child who refuses to believe his mother (his only living parent) is his mother, because he refuses to believe he was born.  Maybe he's the Buddha or maybe he's just an idiot.  Maybe it's the same difference." —William Keckler
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .
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It's Really Happening (permalink)
"Whether or not it's really happening, the brain sends the same signal, and the identical biochemical reaction fires off."
Peter Meyers & Shann Nix, As We Speak: How to Make Your Point and Have It Stick (2011)

Brain signals image by Saad Faruque.  The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .
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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Schopenhauer likened the present moment to the "eternal noon" of a vertically streaming sun.

Photo by Anne Bollwahn.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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June 26, 2013

The Right Word (permalink)
Did you know that the quick brown fox actually jumped over "the lazy mrpldrk"?  It's true; it's in Bewitched.

> read more from The Right Word . . .
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Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)

What in the universe is it all about?  "Ultimately, it's all about the music, isn't it?" (Samuel David McIlhagga, 2006).

(Illustration from Punch, 1893.)
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
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Puzzles and Games (permalink)
"The key is to remember that there are really more people in the room than you can see."

Who is speaking: a psychic or a trial lawyer?

Answer: Daniel Small, Preparing Witnesses: A Practical Guide for Lawyers and their Clients (2004), p. 47 (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)
> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .
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June 25, 2013

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
Here's an 11:07 from 3:10 to Yuma.

(Film still courtesy of DVDBeaver.)
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Grand Transformation!"  An illustration from an 1889 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 24, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The text reads: "The lighthouse floats. —Kaneko Mitsuharu"
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1884 issue of Puck magazine.  This should be of interest: Seance Parlor Feng Shui.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1889 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 23, 2013

Always Remember (permalink)

Image by Mark Gilmour.
"Blood tells—always remember that—blood tells."
Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Note the hidden faces in the branches and rocks in this illustration from an 1884 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 22, 2013

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
"I should like to know how they began all these big businesses, and on how little or how much money, and how the partners met each other.  Where did Fortnum pick up Mason? for example.  There ought to be a book about it."
E. V. Lucas, Down the Sky (1930)

This Fortnum & Mason photo incorporates elements from Natachenka and Stuck in Customs.
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Unseen World."  An illustration from an 1880 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1877 issue of Punch magazine.  This should be of interest: Seance Parlor Feng Shui.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 21, 2013

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
Someone should write a book about a person who gets stuck as a go-between in what is an escalating fight to the death.  He is only the messenger or message-bearer but eventually has to start introducing dangerous people and delivering things between estates like disguised poison.  Eventually, he doesn't even know what innocence is anymore and what is complicity.  And all he signed on to do was let people speak.
William Keckler
> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1892 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to mad cow disease, from all the way back in an 1880 issue of Puck.
> read more from Precursors . . .
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June 20, 2013

A Rose is a ... (permalink)
"Everything was coming up black Peruvian roses."  From the classic sitcom Bewitched.

> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Be it fate of God or dragon luck ..." —Ellen Rogers, Kasey to the Rescue

This image of Lady Luck as a "rouge dragon" appears in Punch, 1889.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 19, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The text reads, "books always a coffin opened to life —Gary Barwin"
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Knavina of Hearts."  An illustration from an 1880 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
"Animalistic music arouses animalistic instincts." —Devorah Heshelis, The Moon's Lost Light (2006)

This illustration of sight reading animalistic music appears in Punch, 1889.

> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .
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June 18, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
About 28 years before Tim Burton's Nightmare Before Christmas, Endora was combining the same two holidays in Bewitched.  The subtitle reads: "'Twas the Night Before Halloween."
> read more from Precursors . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"There is no such thing as chance, any more than chance tosses the tides that whisper their secrets along every ocean-shore." —Roger W. Babson, 1914

(We disagree, though we still like the quotation.)

Here's Lady Luck, not giving a toss who disbelieves in her, from Punch, 1889.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 17, 2013

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
We're delighted to see our photo of the 600-year-old Yamashiro Pagoda (the oldest structure in America) illustrating a Tahoe Trader article about the value of the Yen.

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Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)

Why does Prof. Oddfellow so often rag Big Science, and why does he so often back zero?  Here's a quotation (first posted to our Spotted in the Wild blog) that explains all:

"You should be aware that science, dealing only with the general, leaves out of consideration the individual cases that contradict the enormous majority.  Occasionally the heart is on the right side of the body, but you would not on that account ever put your stethoscope in any other than the usual spot.  It is possible that under certain conditions the law of gravity does not apply, yet you will conduct your life under the conviction that it does so invariably.  Now, there are some of us who choose to deal only with these exceptions to the common run.  The dull man who plays at Monte Carlo puts his money on the colours, and generally black or red turns up; but now and then zero appears, and he loses.  But we, who have backed zero all the time, win many times our stake.  Here and there you will find men whose imagination raises them above the humdrum of mankind.  They are willing to lose their all if only they have chance of a great prize.  Is it nothing not only to know the future, as did the prophets of old, but by making it to force the very gates of the unknown?" —William Somerset Maugham, The Magician
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1870 issue of Beecher's magazine.  The caption reads: "Cartwright calling up the Devil."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"There is ... a fine line between the degree of mystery that stimulates the judgment of the audience members and that which renders the speaker's meaning unintelligible." —Marc Hanvelt, The Politics of Eloquence: David Hume's Polite Rhetoric (2012)
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
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June 16, 2013

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
I would love to find a book in a thrift store titled Feet Dangling as a Rewarding and Enriching Hobby.
William Keckler
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the Grateful Dead: an illustration from an 1884 issue of Puck magazine. The caption reads: "The Deadhead Ticket."
> read more from Precursors . . .
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June 15, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1880 issue of Puck magazine. The caption reads: "There is something in the Bible after all!"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The spirit of peace plays a game of dice with the spirit of strife.  An illustration from a 1902 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 14, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
Alternate universes each have their own "genuine" Shakespeare.  In one reality, the consensus is that Queen Elizabeth was the historical Shakespeare, but there's a passionate group of scholars who are certain that the real author was Willy (in other words, their underdog is our front runner).  In the universe Prof. Oddfellow calls home, the real Shakespeare is quite obviously Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke, whom we've mentioned previously.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1884 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
[We answered this rhetorical question a few years ago, but the vintage illustration is "new," courtesy of Punch, 1877.]

Q: How many beans make five?

A: It’s something of a trick question.  The answer is "one."  One leguminous pod contains five seeds.

Note that this riddle is a corruption of "How many beans make fava."  Again, the answer is "one," though admittedly it's one very broad bean.

> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
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June 13, 2013

The Right Word (permalink)
"Uhhh has nothing to do with it," as we learn in the classic sitcom Bewitched.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1889 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty is that our current scientific models fail. Entirely."
Brian Clegg, Gravity (2012)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .
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June 12, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The text reads: "The fruit fly is stardust, too. —Jeff Hawkins"
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1880 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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The Only Certainty (permalink)
"The only certainty is this: the more tricks you pull out of your bag, the greater the chance that one of them will backfire."  —Char Booth, Reflective Teaching (2011)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .
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June 11, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The Spirit of Elevation and his shoe shiner.  An illustration from an 1880 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: What need of Siege and Conquest in a Play, / When Love can do the work as well as they?  (Elkanah Settle, Ibrahim, the Illustrious Bassa [1676])

A: What need, indeed!
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1869 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Terrific Apparition: Seen during the recent fog at Westminster."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 10, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook, for Jeff Hawkins (but five years late).

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1917 issue of McClure's magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
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June 9, 2013

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
We're honored that How-To-Geek used our massive panorama view from the Saint Augustine lighthouse to demonstrate how to create a photo planet.  They took our original photo:



and transformed it:



> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .
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A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
There has always been a fine line between stage magic and occultism.  Here's a poorly-rehearsed stage magician who mangles his magic words and conjures up a demon, from Punch, 1908.  The caption reads, "An unrehearsed effect."
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1920 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "The veil is not impenetrable; the link of affection is not broken by death; and through the grave and gate of death there shines a dawn of more than mortal vision."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 8, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
You can guess where we're going with this one.  What if Alice and the Wonderland caterpillar had found romance?  Arthur's Home Magazine wondered the same thing (not really) in the same year that Alice's Adventures in Wonderland was published.

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Confound it, the beastly thing's stopped!"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Century Illustrated magazine.  The caption reads: "The demons devouring the sun."

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 7, 2013

A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"Selfish or noble — it's always a fine line."
Nicola Upson, Fear in the Sunlight (a mystery novel set in our favorite haunt, Portmeirion)
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1920 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "There are privileged persons who possess the faculty of allowing their organisms to be used as a medium of communication by intelligences on the other side of the veil."  This should be of interest: Seance Parlor Feng Shui.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 6, 2013

The Right Word (permalink)
In this moment from the classic sitcom Bewitched, Samantha corrects Aunt Clara's previously garbled incantation, changing "abba-dabba-dabba, dabba-dabba-abba" into "aba-daba-daba, daba-daba-uba."

> read more from The Right Word . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to a stretch portrait at Disneyland's Haunted Mansion: an illustration from an 1863 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Death on the Rope."
> read more from Precursors . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Is Time linear or cyclical?  An illustration from an 1863 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 5, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
The West Frisian language is "a fever dream of English in an alternate universe where the Norman Conquest never happened." —Dr. Boli
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "She sat there in her dream."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 4, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From our former outpost at Twitter:

It was an honor and a thrill to be a part of the new magic caper film Now You See Me.  Can you guess exactly how I contributed?
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1893 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1863 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 3, 2013

The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook, for Catherine Welsh, who says "[Silence] has a way with words."

> read more from The Right Word . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1847 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's an Edward Gorey precursor, from 21 years before his birth, in Punch, 1904.

> read more from Precursors . . .
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June 2, 2013

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: "Aren't red and blue 'off white' too?"  —HBG2

A: It's a gray area.  (Forgive us.)

Here's an image by Jason Paluck showing that red and blue do indeed combine to form off-white.
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Richard Dawkins being all wet, from a 1901 issue of The Lady's Realm.  The caption reads, "'Alas! Poor Dawkins!' she cried lightly."

> read more from Precursors . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1903 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Dreaded Summons":  an illustration from a 1906 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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June 1, 2013

Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
Here's a puzzle involving yesterday's weather:

On the day before yesterday, the weatherman said, "Today’s weather is different from yesterday’s. If the weather is the same tomorrow as it was yesterday, the day after tomorrow will have the same weather as the day before yesterday. But if the weather is the same tomorrow as it is today, the day after tomorrow will have the same weather as yesterday.”

It is raining today, and it rained on the day before yesterday. What was the weather like yesterday? (Note: The prediction was correct!)

See the solution at Futility Closet.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of McClure's magazine.  The caption reads: "The vision which had lived in his hopes for now so many weeks."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1899 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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