CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Featured Book
The Young Wizard's Hexopedia
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Cautious or Optimistic
King of Hearts of War and Peace
As I Was, As I Am
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
How to Believe in Your Elf
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Non-Circulating Books
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Answers, Questioned
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
What's In a Name
Yearbook Weirdness
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

Magic Words
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
Martha Brockenbrough
Gordon Meyer
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Phantasmaphile
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
Ironic Sans
Brian Sibley's Blog
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
August 31, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1866 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
"A rose is not always the same rose."
Theatre Histories: An Introduction (2010)

Two-colored rose by tkksummers.
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 30, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's why we're calling this one a precursor to Rosemary's Baby.  Note the doubly long dash after the older woman says, "Take this, if you've been ill."  That doubly long dash seems to suggest an unspoken thought, that the concoction will turn the young woman's fetus into the prophesied son of Satan.  Look again at that long dash and see if you concur.

From Cornhill magazine, 1873.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I thought you dead, or fairy bait."
Jackie Ashton, The White Swans of Fal

This fairy on a hook appears in Punch, 1842.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 29, 2013

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1902 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1859 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)

Floram Marchand, The Water-Spouter, depicted in The Book of Wonderful Characters: Memoirs and Anecdotes of Remarkable and Eccentric Persons in all Ages and Countries, Chiefly from the Text of Henry Wilson and James Caulfield, 1869.  Image via Bibliodyssey.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 28, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From our former outpost at Twitter:

Sagan said if we designed constellations today they'd be refrigerators & microwaves. Clearly no amount of weed can turn a left brain right.

To whatever extent Carl Sagan may have understood the cosmos, he was embarrassingly clueless about the artistic mind.  If you can hear us, Mr. Sagan, you were profoundly incorrect on two counts: people are still connecting the dots to form new constellations, and no, they most certainly aren't picturing refrigerators and microwaves.  We almost want to laugh, but this sort of insight into the left-brain universe is just so chilling.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Alex Baze once tweeted, "Mom has left town, and with her, most of New York City's Splenda packets."

Here's a precursor from Cornhill magazine, 1860.  The caption reads, "Where the sugar goes."
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
That pecular dread of being run over by ducks.  By Raphael Kirchner, in a 1916 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Always Remember (permalink)

"Always remember that there are no rules."
The Practice of Clinical Neuropsychology
> read more from Always Remember . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 27, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
This moment in Bewitched, in which Serena confesses she can't boil water, is a precursor to our "One Hundred Ways I've Failed to Boil Water" (here's the interactive version, and here are all 100 ways in a concise grid.)
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1855 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Interesting group posed for a daguerreotype, by a dear friend of the family . . . Interesting and valuable result."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may be quite surprised at how much you have in fact been spending on entertainment."
Linnette Vassell, Money Matters (1975)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 26, 2013

The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine (permalink)
Writing and dreaming: an image and its gauzy double from Cornhill magazine, 1873.

See the explanation of our repository of ghostly images here.
* The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine promises real ghosts, actual hauntings, and necromancy by proxy.
> read more from The Ghost in the [Scanning] Machine . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Thomas the Tank Engine from an 1850 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A surrealist illustration from a 1906 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "I gazed over into a crumbling formation of hot ashes."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 25, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Always Remember (permalink)

Spotlight by RedHand.
"Always remember that the main attraction is you."
Steve Cone, Steal These Ideas! (2011)
> read more from Always Remember . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 24, 2013

Unicorns (permalink)
Followers of our unicorn research might be intrigued by our latest collaboration with the living legend of magic and mentalism, Kenton Knepper.  We developed a novel system for determining how one's personality type aligns with nine historical unicorns.  We also include another world exclusive: a system for identifying one's totem mythological hybrid beastie.  Secret symbolism, shamanism, mythology and psychology — it's all part of what we call Myth Logic Readings.

> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
As bee populations decline worldwide, scientists remain reluctant to address the needless destruction wrought by angels.  An illustration from an 1868 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
"Oldest trick in the book, buddy.  The old double-fake face smear."
Sarah Mayberry, All They Need (2011)
> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 23, 2013

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Entropy's the patron saint
of patterns that disintegrate.
—a lyric from the Silly Pillows' "Soliloquy to Entropy" (1989)

Disintegrating pattern courtesy of scrappy annie.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)

A still from The Bleak Old Shop of Stuff.  The subtitle reads, "There's a fine line between grieving and racism."

A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The text reads: "I’ll tell you something else … that you can’t know, because  a man’s got to be old to know this, that the more ashes there are on the top of a living heart the longer it’ll burn.” — Merlin, in John Cowper Powys’ novel Porius
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 22, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"The surprising truth is that we all reach a saturation point when it comes to money." —Affluence Intelligence: Earn More, Worry Less, and Live a Happy and Balanced Life
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from an 1860 issue of Punch magazine.
[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Only Certainty (permalink)
"Listen, you know as well as I do that the only certainty around here is that things are never going to get back to normal, don't you?" —David Moody, Autumn: The City (2011)
> read more from The Only Certainty . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 21, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From our former outpost at Twitter:

"Outsider art for insiders" delivers only 7 Google results. This explains a great many of my challenges with my [a]vocation.

The camera obscura allows insiders to enjoy outsider art, as illustrated above.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"There are no miles in a bottle of ink."  (So said an old advertisement for Goodyear Tires.)  This may surprise you, but the fact that there are no miles in a bottle of ink thwarted cartographers for centuries.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from an 1853 issue of Punch magazine.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Only Funny If ... (permalink)
Chicken Road It "will only be funny if it is delivered dead seriously."
With Nails: The Film Diaries of Richard E. Grant (1999)
> read more from Only Funny If ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 20, 2013

Unicorns (permalink)
Though we have raised the price of our field guide to identifying unicorns by sound so as to discourage the general public from seeing its contents, exceptional people are reviewing it.  This review is by someone who previously reviewed only two other items at Amazon: a window fan and a Wi-Fi connector of some sort:

I've always been inclined to assume that I have never seen a unicorn, but I hadn't even finished reading the introduction when my assumption was challenged by a simple question: "How many bird watchers have spied a warbler perched upon a tapered branch, never dreaming that the selfsame branch is, in actuality, a unicorn's horn?"

It's a problem. Vision is an unreliable tool under the best conditions, and as the author points out, "there are great odds that a unicorn will approach from one of your many blind spots." This, of course, to remind us that the most troublesome blind spot of all — in the center of our field of vision, where the optic nerve is connected — is filled in by the brain. Thus, the mind that rejects the existence of unicorns is unlikely to fill that empty optical space with a unicorn.

This leaves sound as the only reliable ally. More than a collection of unicorn-sound waveforms and beyond its value as a compendium of unicorn knowledge, the book calls on us to stare with our ears, as Ken Nordine intended.

"My unicorn can whisper strange things when I want him to, and sometimes when I don’t." —Larry Niven, as quoted in A Field Guide to Identifying Unicorns by Sound

Thanks, Jeff!

> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Puck magazine.  Speaking of which, one of the many things we admire about our British brethren is that they've long been consciously aware that they've slipped down the rabbit hole.  So very few nations realize they're in Wonderland.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe, but this isn't necessarily the reality of the situation."
Jacqueline Corcoran, The Depression Solutions Workbook (2009)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Voluntary and involuntary clairvoyance: three illustrations from The Rosicrucian Cosmo-Conception by Max Heindel  (1911).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 19, 2013

The Right Word (permalink)
Blowhard wasn't exactly the word he was looking for: a still from Bewitched.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1917 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Quite surprisingly, roses have been found to inhibit female desire."
The 30-Day Sex Solution (2011)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 18, 2013

Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from an 1853 issue of Punch magazine.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
You've heard of a bottle imp, but here's a beer stein imp.  From Punch, 1852.  This should also be of interest: How to Believe in Your Elf.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 17, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1917 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Rose is a ... (permalink)

Rosy lips by LunaDiRimmel.
"A rose is a rose is a labia."
Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, Incredibly Alice (2011)
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 16, 2013

Unicorns (permalink)

We're astonished to receive, in spite of an omission of biblical proportions, a five-star review of our unicorn field guide:

The book is nothing if not thorough in reproducing what seems to be everything ever said anywhere in literature pertaining to the sounds made by unicorns. Listening for all of these will charge your humdrum, everyday reality with magic, or at least give it some zip. Conley's omission of the many references to the unicorn in the King James Bible, however, is a puzzler (see Nu 23:22; 24:8; Dt 33:17; Job 39: 9-12; Pss 22:21; 29:6; 92:10; Isa 34:7). Surely Conley knows that fundamentalist champions of the KJV in their millions would find themselves theologically bound to agree with him in presuming the existence of unicorns. Was this deliberate? And if so, was the omission a contemptuous snub or a gesture of respect? I'm almost tempted to deduct a star, but I'm going to take this as a refusal to divide his audience by religion, seeing as how fundamentalist bashers are at least as vocal and nasty as the worst of their targets, and it would be difficult to hear even the clumsiest unicorn over the cantankerous clatter that could result. —Dan Olson
> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1855 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1917 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It's Really Happening (permalink)
"It's really happening. I know it's crazy. I know it's fast. But I don't care about any of that. In my heart, I knew the moment I saw you. And every moment since then has only made me more certain." —Christine Rimmer, The Prince's Secret Baby (2012)

Neon heart image by pinprick.  The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 15, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The sky is pocked with stars.  What eyes the wise men must have had to see a new one in so many.  I wonder, were there fewer stars then?  I don't know.  I fancy there's a mystery in it." —The Lion in Winter

Our illustration appears in Pleasant Hours, 1887.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Always Remember (permalink)
"Always remember that you are the director of your own mental movies."
Nancy Kalish, The Nice Girl's Guide to Sensational Sex (2003)

Photo by Biappi.
> read more from Always Remember . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 14, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
Biographies of Jesus "are theological Rorschach tests that tell us far more about those who create them than about the elusive historical Jesus." —Elizabeth Castelli, summarizing Albert Schweitzer's Von Reimarus zu Wrede: Eine Geschichte der Leben-Jesu-Forschung
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
This precursor to Salvador Dalí is entitled "Wednesday, August 14, 1867."  From Punch.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Simple Answers (permalink)
Hilda: Dylan Thomas was right, you know.
Evadne: About what?
Hilda: Everything.
Dear Ladies
If this is not the answer you’re looking for,
click here for a different answer.
> read more from Simple Answers . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: The average man's IQ is 107.  The average brown trout's IQ is 4.  So why can't a man catch a brown trout?

A: Lower-tech animals can be much quicker.  (Steven Pinker, How the Mind Works, 2009)
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 13, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the Coen brothers' baby-snatching comedy Raising Arizona, from an 1869 issue of Pleasant Hours.  The caption reads: "'Wife, here is your Christmas present!' he called out, as he placed the boy in her arms."
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Among the Bunnies": an illustration from an 1890 issue of Punch magazine.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe, but ships that carry a thousand or two thousand people at a time are the norm nowadays."
Kim Kavin, Everything Family Guide to Cruise Vacations (2011)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 12, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
The concept of de-evolution is that humankind is regressing, as evidenced by the dysfunction and herd mentality of American society.  The idea was developed in the late 1960s by the founders of the band Devo.  Could they have been inspired by this 1964 episode of Bewitched?

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a sword suspension from 1848, about a year before Robert-Houdin debuted his famous broomstick illusion.  From Punch.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 11, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
A glass bottle from modern civilization is tossed into another world: an unmistakable precursor to the 1980 comedy film The Gods Must Be Crazy.  From Punch, 1902.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 10, 2013

Colorful Allusions (permalink)
Did we ever mention that our color palette "Moonlit Black Swan" is featured on page 166 of Color Inspirations?
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1859 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"What with everything else you may be quite surprised to know that I produced an essay of 13 pages this week."
Edward Boyle: His Life (1991)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 9, 2013

Colorful Allusions (permalink)
"It struck me that it was different in colour": a black-and-white illustration from The Quiver, 1879.
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Heat imps: an illustration from an 1890 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Only Funny If ... (permalink)
Chicken Road "A story like that could only be funny if it happened to George Carlin."
If You Fall Down, Pick Yourself Up Like a Lady
> read more from Only Funny If ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 8, 2013

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
To those who praised me for not being the least bit affected by a U.K. reader's colorful broadside against one of my books ("STOP producing useless works of nothingness" and "The best use of this work would be to shred it for hamster bedding"), I must confess that I hadn't been aware of the review; I was frankly too busy working on useless nothingness!  However, the review is absolutely correct that my book (and, truth be told, my entire body of work) is marvelous for hamster bedding.  I challenge hamster caretakers worldwide to purchase any one of my books, shred it, and verify that it's the best hamster bedding nobody ever used.  Send photos and results to the e-mail address provided here.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Presumptive Conundrums (permalink)
1 + 1 = 3, for large values of 1.

Photo of Mike by Prof. Oddfellow.
* Learn more about Presumptive Conundrums at Amazon.com.
> read more from Presumptive Conundrums . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Colorful Allusions (permalink)
"Poems come in two colors: grey and beige (ecru having been killed off a few years back)."
Geof Huth

Photo courtesy of Rhian.
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 7, 2013

Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"He told us, apropos of nothing in particular, that Freudians tended to have 'more swinging' parties than post-Freudians."
Victor Chen, Anti-Politics: A Story and Various Papers
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
We call this one "O.C.D. MDCCCLXXXIII."  The caption reads, "They opened every folded paper they could find."  (The Leisure Hour from — you guessed it — 1883.)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I mean the deer thing was a long time ago. Why bring it up now?"
Stevi Mittman, Who Makes Up These Rules, Anyway? (2006)

Here's a "deer thing" from a 1908 issue of The Windsor Magazine.  The caption reads, "The thing came away from the head."  [For Gary Barwin.]
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 6, 2013

Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
We're glad to have contributed a photograph to "Imagination Made Real," an article about the architecture of Portmeirion, Wales.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Fifty-one years before one of the all-time great fads of college kids cramming themselves into telephone booths, people "launched themselves in a body at ... unfortunate telephone[s]," as we see in The Windsor Magazine, 1908.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Watchman: What of the Night?"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe that someone could be so fully present at one moment and totally gone the next."
Edward Myers & Kelly Adams, When Will I Stop Hurting? (2004)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 5, 2013

Ampersands (permalink)
Our best feedback tends to come from outside our target market.  For example, we just received a 5-star review for our highly unusual manual on ampersands, by someone who accidentally bought it:

This book was ordered by mistake.  But it was one of those little gems.  Get a copy & judge for yourself.
* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to The Matrix (1999), from a 1968 episode of Bewitched.  Larry takes the red pill.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from an 1854 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Apropos of Nothing (permalink)

photo by Cobalt 123
"[He] says, apropos of nothing in that sunny afternoon's affable, inconsequential banter, and in crisply enunciated, declamatory English: 'The world, which seems to lie before us like a land of dreams, so various, beautiful, so new, hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, nor certitude, nor peace, nor help from pain; and we are here as on a darklling plain swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight where ignorant armies clash by night."
Mark Leyner, The Tetherballs of Bougainville: A Novel (2011)
> read more from Apropos of Nothing . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 4, 2013

Unicorns (permalink)
From our former outpost at Twitter:

An illiterate rated my unicorn guide 1-star; as I told my 1st grade teacher: no thanks, I have my own stars at home.

Unicorn stars courtesy of zoomar.
> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"One of the saddest things in life is that the remark which one fails to catch the first time, and has to have repeated, is so seldom worth it." —E. V. Lucas, Down the Sky
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 3, 2013

Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 15
• 8-letter words: 4

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1865 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The secret enemy of teeth":  an illustration from a 1917 issue of Saturday Evening Post magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 2, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"He on her accents hung."

To wit:

He stroked his circumflex'd bar across her double acute raised dots, her lower dot, and her slash.

From The Quiver, 1876.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1889 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The caption reads: "I have an apple seed in the appendicula veriformis."

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

August 1, 2013

Strange Dreams (permalink)
We're all familiar with the concept of a "recurring dream."  But here's a serious question: could that concept itself be imaginary?  Take this "real world" example: last night we dreamt of not being surprised by two guys who suddenly had red afros.  It wasn't a lucid dream, but our dream self wasn't surprised by an otherwise unexpected turn of events because it was all a re-run, as it were.  Here's the key issue: if a dream narrative suggests that one's dream character has seen it all before, isn't that by extension a fiction because it's a part of the script?  (As James Hillman reminds us in The Dream and the Underworld, dreams aren't real.)  Now, if one keeps a dream diary and over the years there are several mentions of red afros, does this say less about dreams and more about living the same day over and over, à la Nietzsche's theory of eternal recurrence?
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Jonathan: Whatever happened to Roquefort dressing?
Hilary: It just turned into "bleu cheese" dressing, right?
Jonathan: They didn't coexist for a while, like Neanderthal and Cro Magnon?
Oddfellow: Yes, but only after the Pre-Camemberian Era, a span of very hard cheeses.

[Did you know that cheesemaking colanders have been discovered amongst Roquefort-sur-Soulzon's prehistoric relics?]

[Also: not only did cavemen invent the cheese wheel, but they also invented bleu cheese.  We present, collaged for your convenience, Exhibit A below: Rogue Creamery's Caveman Blue.]

> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
One of the many tools we use to create Abecedarian.  (To paraphrase Teresa at Frog Blog.)  From Punch, 1854.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest



Page 0 of 882



Original Content Copyright © 2017 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.