CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Featured Book
The Young Wizard's Hexopedia
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Cautious or Optimistic
King of Hearts of War and Peace
As I Was, As I Am
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
How to Believe in Your Elf
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Miscellanies of Mr. Jonathan
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Non-Circulating Books
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Answers, Questioned
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
What's In a Name
Yearbook Weirdness
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

Magic Words
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
Martha Brockenbrough
Gordon Meyer
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Phantasmaphile
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
Ironic Sans
Brian Sibley's Blog
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
September 30, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1888 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1842 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may be quite surprised at how much you can get for that old painting that's been sitting in the attic for years."
Green Your Home All in One For Dummies (2009)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 29, 2013

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Librarians have acquired tastes.  (That's a Googlewhack, but surely the joke's been done?)

(Thanks to New Hampshire's Keene Public Library for acquiring our Tarot of Portmeirion.  We can hardly imagine a lovelier home for the deck than a Victorian mansion!)

The Keene Public Library occupies a Second Empire mansion built c. 1869 by Henry Colony.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1879 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Exactly one-hundred years before the giant dragonfly's debut in Monster on the Campus, these monstrosities appeared in Punch (1858).

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 28, 2013

Strange Dreams (permalink)
"The Unknown Bull": an illustration from an 1862 issue of Punch magazine.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This is the best rendition of a giraffe jumping off an elephant into a crocodile's mouth that we've seen all year.  From Punch, 1858.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 27, 2013

The Right Word (permalink)
"Sensational.  I knew somebody would come up with the right word."  A still from the classic sitcom Bewitched, season six.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1856 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Every Lady Her Own Perambulator."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Always Remember (permalink)
"You should always remember that society isn't always all that it's cracked up to be."
Patrick W. McDermott, The Memoirs of the Walrus (2010)

Tuamatuan Conception of the Cosmos, via John Curran.
> read more from Always Remember . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 26, 2013

Book of Whispers (permalink)
"Silence is of different kinds, and breathes different meanings." —Charlotte Brontë, Villette
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The spirit of the teapot: an illustration from an 1862 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Now then, I'm ready if you are..."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Unless you have heard it yourself you may find it hard to believe that the woodcock, that long-billed, bug-eyed eater of earthworms, can sing a song as sweet as a nightingale's."
Field & Stream (April 1972)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 25, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Battle of the Alphabet": an illustration from an 1843 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Only Funny If ... (permalink)
Chicken Road "I think someone realized it would only be funny if it was clear that the spelling error was intentional."
John Gierach, Death, Taxes, and Leaky Waders (2001)
> read more from Only Funny If ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 24, 2013

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt, acclaimed for tirelessly demonstrating an effervescent mastery of the agreeably diverting traditions, offers this quip:

At first glance, I could've sworn that one island off the coast of Alaska had the shape of an eight-limbed cephalopod... but it was just an octopal Aleutian.

[No man is an island: we picture below an octopal Aleutian.]
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Only Funny If ... (permalink)
Chicken Road "You would have had to be there, and even then it'd only be funny if you'd been drinking."
Paul Alan Fahey, The Other Man (2013)
> read more from Only Funny If ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
You've heard the old saying that one catches more flies with honey, but the truth is that one catches more flies with reconnaissance.  An illustration from an 1856 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 23, 2013

Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from an 1856 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "The very idea of work [in] this beautiful weather is repugnant to my feelings."
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
"A model hieroglyphic with sure prophecies for the next hundred years": from Punch, 1848.
> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may be quite surprised at the pleasant sounds you are making."
Shelley Katsh & Carol Merle-Fishman, The Music Within You (1985)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 22, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1888 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Papal scarecrow was abandoned in the fields."
Richardson Little Wright, Forgotten Ladies (1928)

This papal scarecrow appears in Punch, 1857.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 21, 2013

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from an 1848 issue of Punch magazine.

> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
"A rose is a rose because it has the principle of 'rose' and not the principle of 'fork.'"
Lee Dian Rainey, Confucius and Confucianism: The Essentials (2010)

A rose with forks, by LuluP.

Rose forks by Fox & Thomas.
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 20, 2013

A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
The fine line between a Leitmotiv and an addiction.
Nein Quarterly
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
[A previous post, updated.]

"You are a vampire.  You look into the mirror and see yourself.  You then realize that you are the reflection, and the vampire can't see you." —Tenuous Pun

Prof. Oddfellow checks for fangs in a vampire mirror in Los Feliz, California.

> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
A precursor to Jerry slicing Tom in half, in the Hanna-Barbera cartoon: an illustration from an 1862 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"The skeleton key to getting to know ourselves is the discovery that we can get to know ourselves on many levels."
Jerry Stocking

Riding the skeleton key into the garden of forking paths, from Punch, 1852.

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 19, 2013

This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"Why do you always look so sad when you look at the sea, Wenna?"  (Cornhill, 1875.)
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Over a century before the famous finale of Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb: an illustration from an 1862 issue of Punch magazine.

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It's Really Happening (permalink)
"It's really happening. I mean, up until now, it seemed like a dream, but ... it's really happening."
Nancy Thelen, Lost and Found (2011)

Dreamscape image by Bradley Newman.  The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 18, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the thrice great Charles Fort, on humankind being ghosts:

[Samuel] Johnson had a peculiar temperament. For a time he was extremely interested in the subject of ghosts. He was so interested in them that he spent several nights in an abandoned house to see if he could meet one. Apparently, he didn’t. There’s a famous passage by the Scottish writer, Thomas Carlyle … in which he talks about Johnson, saying that Johnson wanted to see a ghost. And Carlyle wonders: "What is a ghost? A ghost is a spirit that has taken corporal form and appears for a while among men.” Then Carlyle adds, "How could Johnson not have thought of this when faced with the spectacle of the human multitudes he loved so much in the streets of London, for if a ghost were a spirit that has taken a corporal form for a brief interval, why did it not occur to him that the London multitudes were ghosts, that he himself was a ghost? What is each man but a spirit that has taken corporal form briefly and then disappears? What are men if not ghosts? —A Lecture on Johnson and Boswell by Borges

More on Samuel Johnson's ghost: http://oneletterwords.com/weblog/?id=5754.

See the explanation of our repository of ghostly images here.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Death and his brother Sleep."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
"Throw underlings to the wolves while the top dogs hide behind the ramparts."
Paul W. Rea, Mounting Evidence (2011)
> read more from Oldest Tricks in the Book . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 17, 2013

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
"Nested lucid dreamers, when observed in a mirror, are reversed not only right to left, but dream to dream." —Jeff Hawkins

From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Punch magazine.

> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)

The caption reads, "I like to be despised."  From Punch, 1850.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 16, 2013

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
During a visit to the Yale University Art Gallery, the scalawag Jonathan Caws-Elwitt gave an impromptu tour of the muses:

1. The Muse of Getting High and Really Digging That Ping-Pong Ball.




2. The Muse of Miming a Melody When It's Obvious Your Instrument Doesn't Actually Have Any Strings.




3. The Muse of Being Interrupted Yet Again While Trying to Read the Goddamn Paper, but It's OK Because Your Kid Made You a Laurel Wreath and How Sweet Is That?




4. The Muse of Getting Really Bored with Your Agricultural Tasks.




5. The Muse of Ruining Your Own Painting by Touching the Canvas with Your Thumb.




6. The Muse of Wondering What Happened to the Other Dramatic Mask from Your Matched Set.




7. The Muse of Trying to Practice Your Scales but Getting Sidetracked by a Kid Who Has Unrolled All the Toilet Paper.




8. The Muse of Getting Frustrated by the Fact That It's Really Difficult to Draw Continental Landforms Accurately in Two Dimensions, When It Really Requires a Sphere to Render Them Properly.




9. The Muse of Regretting That You Agreed to Look at Your Friend's Manuscript.


> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 15, 2013

This May Surprise You (permalink)
Hackers deleted our photographic proof that a blurry harvest moon perfectly lines up with the eyes, nose, cheekbones, and enigmatic smile of Leonardo Da Vinci's Mona Lisa.  [The only good that comes of hacker deletions is that we're shown we're truly onto something ... something perhaps too "dangerous" for the zeitgeist!]  We have restored our proof here:

http://oneletterwords.com/weblog/?id=3018
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: "Why, on earth, on Sunday?"  (Cornhill magazine, 1863)
A: "[It was] on Sunday because it was already Monday over there." (Terry Webb, Re-Membering Libraries, 2000)
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 14, 2013

Unicorns (permalink)
To paraphrase José Ortega Y Gasset, when we hear a unicorn, it is the unicorn that is present and evident, not our hearing it.  We do not hear our hearing when we are listening.  In order to realize that there is such a thing as our hearing, we have to stop listening and remember that a moment ago we were hearing.  We hear our hearing when we are outside it, when it is not immediate to us, when the reality with which it had to do -- hearing the unicorn -- is reality no longer, but rather we are in another reality which we call 'remembering a past event': recalling that we heard a unicorn.  To those who think that unicorns are not real, we reply that what we think is never reality; a thought doesn't and can't think itself -- a thought, far from being fundamental reality, is no more than an invention -- something hypothetical or theoretical.  To truly know unicorns, it is necessary to subtract all of that which has been thought, to realize that the reality of unicorns is always different from that which is thought.  In a nutshell, the pre-intellectual executive act consists in the coexistence of oneself with unicorns.

Big-eared unicorn gargoyle photo courtesy of Wolfgang Schubert.
> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1871 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 13, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Incantation": an illustration from an 1890 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Both the origin of the world and its inner truth are unknowable.
Damascius' treatise on the beginning of things

* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.  No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"There are times you may be quite surprised, or even blindsided, by situations that you did not predict."
John B. Montgomery, Great from the Start (2012)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 12, 2013

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from an 1890 issue of Punch magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
We think he is only half joking: an illustration from an 1855 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
We dug up a quotation to help explain the illustration (from Punch, 1842):

"Many scholars do not use the term 'doll' for the ritual figures used by adult women, due to a belief that this association with children's toys trivializes the ritual figures." —Philip M. Peek, African Folklore: An Encyclopedia
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 11, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Demon Alps": an illustration from an 1890 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Always Remember (permalink)
"Always remember that another person is not you, for that other person knows too well that you are different from him."
Marcus Garvey, Message to the People (1986)

Photo by Dave B.
> read more from Always Remember . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1901 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine.  The headline reads: "Insight."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 10, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's a Darwinian ancestor from Punch, 1887.

But did you know that we demonstrate how you can trace your own ancestry to this creature in our book Heirs to the Queen of Hearts?
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1887 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Only Funny If ... (permalink)
Chicken Road "You can only be funny if people let you but you can always be a fool."
Ken Willidau, An Off Day in My World's Fair: (A Self-Amusement Park) (2010)
> read more from Only Funny If ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 9, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to a memorable scene from Best in Show: "We could not talk or talk forever and still find things to not talk about."  The caption reads, "Having our choice between nothing to say, and the excess."  From Cornhill magazine, 1871.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
A maledicta machine: an illustration from a 1900 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"You may find it hard to believe, but there is an answer to the high price of gasoline."
Popular Mechanics (March 1983)
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 8, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration by Raphael Kirchner from a 1916 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the signature "Be seeing you" sign in the cult television series The Prisoner.  It's from Colliers magazine, May 17, 1919.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 7, 2013

Unicorns (permalink)
From our former outpost at Twitter:

"It’s as if we believe gravity is real & unicorns are not. ... How damaged our belief systems are."
http://library.hrmtc.com/2013/09/03/the-alchemy-of-storytelling/
> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 7
• 8-letter words: 3

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1906 issue of Puck magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 6, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Note the astonishing typographic art in this mangled scan from Google Books.  The scanner's fingers have been transformed into textual kaleidoscopes.  The page in question is from Cornhill magazine, 1865.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
We're delighted to present to you "The Sum of Human Knowledge," from a 1917 issue of Puck magazine.  What more could we add?
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
"A rose is a rose . . . except when you're shopping for flowers for your wedding. Then a 'bridal' rose is suddenly eight times more expensive than a regular rose." —Denise Fields, Bridal Bargains (2010)
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 5, 2013

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the 3D printing (additive manufacturing) process, from Cornhill magazine, 1883.  We see that the more things tech, the more they stay the same.

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1859 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's "the genius of the cork," the imp of drunkenness ("angel or devil according to contending moralists") who sits with every solitary drinker, taking not a drop himself but telling stories and singing songs and filling your gaping pockets with ideal gold.  (Punch, 1842).  This should also be of interest: How to Believe in Your Elf.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 4, 2013

Unicorns (permalink)
If we had to choose but one shop to carry our whimsical field guide to identifying unicorns by sound, it would be Castle in the Air in Berkeley, California.  Imagine our delight to hear that our book is back in stock there, and that folks have been "pawing through it, gleaning its wisdom."  [Thanks, Clint!]

Speaking of castles in the air, we spotted the immaterial tower below within the world of Google Maps.  This castle "exists" in the town of Warwick, England.  But get this: we spent so much quality time bi-locating to England that Google defaulted our browser to the U.K. version.  No kidding: we're automatically redirected to Google.co.uk, even when we explicitly type "google.com."  Can't make this stuff up.

> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Right Word (permalink)

From our blog dedicated to magic words and symbols spotted in the wild:

The Lord of Misrule, magician/comedian Tommy Cooper, sometimes intoned an "incomprehensible incantation of dubious foreign extraction that might have been spelled 'Zhhzhhzhhzhh,' but probably wasn't" (John Fisher, Tommy Cooper: Always Leave Them Laughing, 2006, p. 6).

[Thanks, Jonathan!]


> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
About seventy years before Hemingway debuted The Old Man and the Sea, we find the story of "The Old Woman of the Sea" in Cornhill magazine, 1883.

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Look at the events in your dreams symbolically, not literally, and you may be quite surprised by the wisdom you find."
Mind Over Money: How to Program Your Mind For Wealth
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 3, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This illustration from Cornhill (1880) isn't especially remarkable except for the fact that it depicts one of those decisive moments in which everything is changed.  (Frederic Tuten is a master at handling such turning points; see his Self Portraits: Fictions.)

The caption reads, "And then in a moment all was changed."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1856 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Right Word (permalink)
The conclusion of the "hermit's" fragments, from Punch, 1842.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 2, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
John Leech sketched this for a tale about a clown who had to crack jokes in a circus while his wife was in her dying agonies after fatally missing her footing on a leap from a standing position on horseback; the rip in the hoop is meant to suggest the initial letter I of the story.  From Cornhill magazine, 1864.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
An illustration from a 1916 issue of Puck magazine.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1904 issue of Saturday Evening Post magazine.  The caption reads: "We both stared thoughtfully at the hat-rack."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

September 1, 2013

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1864 issue of Punch magazine.  The caption reads: "Design for 'a monument embracing a bronze statue.'"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Goldilocks retired as a nanny, don't you know?  Nursemaiding a bear with a turkey leg, from Punch, 1853.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest



Page 0 of 1017



Original Content Copyright © 2017 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.