CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Featured Book
The Young Wizard's Hexopedia
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Cautious or Optimistic
King of Hearts of War and Peace
As I Was, As I Am
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
How to Believe in Your Elf
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Non-Circulating Books
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Answers, Questioned
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
Yearbook Weirdness
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

Magic Words
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
Martha Brockenbrough
Gordon Meyer
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Phantasmaphile
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
Ironic Sans
Brian Sibley's Blog
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
November 30, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Disney's Tower of Terror attraction.

Photo on left via SpareFoot Blog.  Photo on right via Disneyland Parc Guide.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It's Really Happening (permalink)
We're honored that The Wild Swan blog dubbed us "the mind-ninja and time traveler librarian that shares a really interesting and not really well known selection of imagery of forgotten books in a funny way, giving them life again."

The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.  The background is courtesy of Matthew Kirkland.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
How to one-up a 1960s aficionado: "Well, when it comes to the sixties, there's nothing like the literal sixties — the decade beginning 60 CE.  Take the wedge, for example; how can one compare the 1960s' wedge-heel shoe to Gaius Suetonius Paulinus defeating the rebels at the Battle of Watling Street using a flying wedge formation?  Sure, there was the Nehru Jacket, but you should have seen what Nero was wearing!  Granted, the Civil Rights movement took a lot of gall, but so did Civilis when he led the uprising of Gaul.  Imagine comparing the Grateful Dead to the Dead Sea Scrolls — if I may be so 'blunt.'"

> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but I use a yellow crayon." —Phil Robinson, Tai Chi: the Way of Balance in an Unbalanced World
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: "How long must I endure this?" (Nasby in Exile by David Ross Locke, 1882)
A: "We must endure until we can no longer bear it, — until we faint and die." (Edward Dorr Griffin, Various Practical Subjects, 1844)
> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"I render you odious and invidiously," from Striking and Picturesque Delineations of the Scenery Around Loch-Earn by Angus McDiarmid, 1877.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 29, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The broken windows at Apsley House, 1831, from Hyde Park from Domesday-Book to Date by John Ashton, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Behind the chair of the sleeping man I saw a child."  From In a Sea Bird's Nest by Frances Clare, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


No News Is Good News (permalink)

"Evil tidings," from The White Cat by Ernest Warren and illustrated by H. Ludlow, 1882.

> read more from No News Is Good News . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Backsheesh! or, Life and Adventures in the Orient by Thomas Wallace Knox, 1875.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Modern Psychical Phenomena Recent Researches and Speculations by Hereward Carrington (1919).  The caption reads: "Huge hypnotic wheel, as used in the 'mysteries of Myra,' containing more than 50 revolving mirrors, reflecting light."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 28, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the traditional mayhem at Walmart on Black Friday, from St. Nicholas magazine, 1921.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Pisa is the capital of leaning towers?  Baloney!

From The Illustrated Universal Gazetteer by William Francis Ainsworth, 1860.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"She took the helm and he the sail; the boat drave with a sudden wind across the deeps."  From Idylls of the King by Alfred Tennyson, 1898.  A hi-res version of the image is here or here.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"They were disguised as storks," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Southerly Busters by Ironbark, 1878.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


 
The text reads, "Our soul is in the eye, and when we open it, it escapes and becomes the universe.  You will see everything in the line diagram of a biology book."  —Stanley Crawford, Travel Notes
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 27, 2014

This May Surprise You (permalink)
Campfires and hearth fires are connected through what physicists now call "quantum entanglement," as we see in The Hudson by Wallace Bruce and illustrated by Alfred Fredericks, 1894.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The very ticking of the clock filled us with alarms," from Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Berlin Under the New Empire by Henry Vizetelly, 1879.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The Fool in books, from Cassell's Library of English Literature, edited by Henry Morley, 1883.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

Saint Betty: "You know, the nun who taught the lepers how to sing." —Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (1982)

Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 26, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the phenomenon of Google Books scanners' accidental hand photos, from The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 1874.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)

(From My Northern Exposure: The Kawa At the Pole by Walter E. Traprock, 1922.  Thanks, Jonathan Caws-Elwitt!)
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

"'And from balloons,' she said.  'And from balloons,' he answered."  From Gryll Grange by Thomas Love Peacock, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the maxim that "it is better to look good than to feel good," from The Oxford Thackeray.  The caption reads, "And upon me honour and conshience, now I'm dthressed, but I look intirely ginteel."
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Something, Defined (permalink)
"You're always thinking something is something else."
> read more from Something, Defined . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 25, 2014

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
The text reads, "The secret to getting back on one's feet lies in simple inversion.  Cats famously land on their feet by using a pinhole to project an inverted image."  [For the Wild Swan.]

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
Circles of mystery and mystic elf sorcery.  This is not from How to Believe in Your Elf.

A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Midsummer Eve by S. C. Hall, 1870.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It also bears repeating that writers about leisure give very little attention to work."
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)

"Somber, gloomy, desolate without," from The White Cat by Ernest Warren and illustrated by H. Ludlow, 1882.


*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but I really can't make this any simpler than I already have."
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 24, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
You've heard of "throwing someone to the wolves," but did you know the practice was a precursor to Daylight Savings?  The caption reads, "Threw them to the wolves to gain time."  From A Boyar of the Terrible by Frederick J. Whishaw, 1896.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"'It burns bravely,' laughed the old woman."  From Bladys of the Stewponey by Sabine Baring-Gould and illustrated by F. H. Townsend, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar (1963), from Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"M. Giraumont — 'hates authors,'" from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Only Funny If ... (permalink)
Chicken Road "One is justified in judging that something is funny if and only if one finds oneself or others laughing or inclined to laugh in that spontaneous, unforced way which is characteristic of humor."
> read more from Only Funny If ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 23, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Life and Death by D. Lambden Flemming, 1873.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
Forget trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.  Here's how to fit a starlike peg in a round hole.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)

Prof. Oddfellow (right).
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Comic History of Greece by Charles Snyder (1898).  The caption reads: "Then the plunge in consommé."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 22, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
 This should also be of interest: How to Believe in Your Elf.

A self-portrait by Prof. Oddfellow.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"The chaplain gives up the sea, to Katherine's great satisfaction."  From Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The Cabinet of Gems of Books (1875) reminds us of a gem of a book:

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Letters of Charles Dickens (1893).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 21, 2014

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The world is figuratively one's oyster, and "the world may undoubtedly be an oyster, though to whom it would belong, to whom it would be answerable in that capacity, is a great deal less certain.  It's something that will have to remain a matter for conjecture until science comes up with a definitive answer." —N.F. Simpson, If So, Then Yes

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"During all that time she never turned a page," from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë and illustrated by Frederick Henry Townsend, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I found myself sitting bolt upright in bed, while a roar like the crack of doom rang in my ears," from With the Colours by Richard Mounteney Jephson, 1881.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
"Oh horrors!"  From Alter Ejusdem by James Archibald Sidey, 1877.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The New Hyperion by Edward Strahan, 1875.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Indubitably (?) (permalink)
"Indubitably."
"Indubitably?"  Adrianne repeated the word, to make sure she'd heard it correctly.  "Since when do you use words like indubitably?"
Red Like Crimson by Janice Thompson, 2012
*If Merriam (or Webster?) is correct that indubitably is not the kind of word that gets used in everyday conversation, except perhaps for humorous effect, then insert comedy drum roll here.
> read more from Indubitably (?) . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 20, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I am dying, beloved—and shall soon go into the dark unknown."  From The Sign of the Spider by Bertram Mitford, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"Just as long as they don't come anywhere near me." —Alan Edge, Faith of Our Fathers
> read more from On One Condition . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
It's not that cats were bigger in 1882; it's the people who were tiny.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Lays of Ind by Aliph Cheem, 1883.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

"He was quite unchanged, the dear old Moon!"  From Fairy Tales from Hans Andersen (1906) by Gordon Browne.


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 19, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Within this awful volume lies the mystery of mysteries."  From Golden Thoughts from Golden Fountains, engraved by the Brothers Dalziel, 1868.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Melt the magic halls away," from The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, 1870.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Braving the elements," from Sunshine and Storm in the East by Annie Brassey, 1881.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
The cartels have been maintaining a high level since at least 1884, as we see in The Doctor's Family by Henry Frith.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


No News Is Good News (permalink)
"No humbugge," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
> read more from No News Is Good News . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating: you can't escape or ignore the way you were raised."
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 18, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Bewitched, as if Tabitha's future grandchild were speaking:

On Monday next comes All-Hallows-Even,
My grandmother's maiden name was Stephens.

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"That cloud foreshoweth a bloody dukkeripen," from Lavengro; The Scholar, the Gypsy, the Priest by George Henry Borrow, 1896.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"One of the nine genii shooting a dog in the heavens," from Social Life of the Chinese by Justus Doolittle, 1867.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Ampersands (permalink)
"The defiant ampersand still visible on his forehead." —Brian Joseph Davis, Portable Altamont

Prof. Oddfellow sports a scarlet ampersand at Saint Michael's Mount in Cornwall.
* A manual for typographers published in 1917 acknowledged that there are many beautiful forms of the ampersand, yet it forbade their use in "ordinary book work."  Extraordinary books are another matter.  Our lavishly illustrated Ampersand opus explores the history and pictography of the most common coordinating conjunction.
> read more from Ampersands . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a vintage example of the idiom "you'll eat your words," from Young Americans in Japan by Edward Greey, 1882.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Dark-Circle": an illustration from an 1875 issue of Wide World magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 17, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Bud, Blossom, Berry, are you there?  Appear!"  From The Kitchen Maid by Mary F. Guillemard and illustrated by J. Bernard Partridge 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"He took a shining date out of the moolah's beard."  From The Tragedy of the Korosko by Arthur Conan Doyle, 1898.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Even back in 1878, folks longed for simpler times.  From The National and Domestic History of England by William Hickman Smith Aubrey.  The caption reads, "Bucklersbury in 'simple time.'"
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a rare view of the backside of a halo, or perhaps a precursor to Margaret Atwood's "halo in reverse" (Lady Oracle, 1987), from Im Reiche des Aeolus by Adolph von Pereira, 1883.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Momus suggests that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out.'"
Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

Still Life With Woodpecker by Tom Robbins

If this typewriter can't do it, then fuck it, it can't be done.  Suddenly, a shot rings out.

(Thanks, June!)
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 16, 2014

This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
From The Crimson Fairy Book by Andrew Lang, 1903.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"She looked up ... then she looked down."  [But then did she look all around?]  From Jess by Henry Rider Haggard, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Baby's Museum by Uncle Charlie, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"The sough of the ocean," from Southerly Busters by Ironbark, 1878.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Ballads of the Bench and Bar by James Balfour Paul, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The Cuddapah Brahmin, named Sheshal, levitates in The Saturday Magazine (1832).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 15, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
From Palestine, Past and Present by Henry Stafford Osborn, 1859.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
From Romances of the Wheel by W. J. Coppen, 1880.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
"The light of other days," from A History of the Cries of London, Ancient and Modern by Charles Hindley, 1884.

> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
"The goslings of melody," from The New Hyperion by Edward Strahan, 1875.
> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Shadow on the Blind by Louisa Baldwin (1895).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 14, 2014

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
"Here's to the great god Self," from Ozmar the Mystic by Emeric Hulme Beaman, 1896.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Address to the Deil," from The Illustrated Family Burns by Robert Burns, 1866.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Broadside Black-letter Ballads, edited by John Payne Collier, 1868.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Berlin Under the New Empire by Henry Vizetelly, 1879.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Southerly Busters by Ironbark, 1878.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
An illustration from Gulliver's Travels.  The caption reads: "I found myself within my depth."
[The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 13, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The queen wasp related how an elf had disturbed their nest."  From The Revelations of a Sprite, written and illustrated by Auber Melville Jackson, 1897.  This should also be of interest: How to Believe in Your Elf.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Tales from the Veld by Ernest Glanville, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Old and not cheerful," from Nasby in Exile by David Ross Locke, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Giving it mouth, and mouth to give it with," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A sketch by our insane artist," from The Man in the Moon, Volume IV.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from La Vie a Montmartre by Georges Montogueil (1899).
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 12, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Land of the Living Dead by Neal Fyne, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Nonsense Dept. (permalink)
"We should say either 'complete nonsense' or 'utter nonsense,' since they mean the same thing.  I could also argue we should leave both 'complete' and 'utter' out, since nonsense is nonsense, and there's no such thing as something being half nonsense."
> read more from Nonsense Dept. . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"You can find there twice as many as you've lost here.  'Pass into the 'a-a-all!'"  From Sketches Beyond the Sea by Franc B. Wilkie, 1880.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Right Word (permalink)
What's in a name?  Here's Samuel Merry from History of Trumbull and Mahoning Co.'s, 1882.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to our world of misinformation, from Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain.

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster RoseA rose is not just a rose: it is the vibrant depths of the color crimson, the whirl of intricate interlaced patterns, the soft texture of velvet.
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 11, 2014

The Right Word (permalink)
Here's the Forgotten Alphabet, courtesy of Hilary and Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the Teletubbies, from a camera advertisement in The Pharmaceutical Era, 1887.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
From Lavengro; The Scholar, the Gypsy, the Priest by George Henry Borrow, 1896.  The caption reads, "There is nothing like flinging the bones!"
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Australian absurdist pantomime performer Grahame Bond (of "Aunty Jack" fame), from A Series of Original Portraits and Caricature Etchings by John Kay, 1877.

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
Heraldic animals do not have rights, but the inhumane treatment of heraldic animals is inconsistent with armorial morality.  [Or something.]  Our illustration of an apparent heraldic animal farm appears in Berlin Under the New Empire by Henry Vizetelly, 1879.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

An illustration from Napoléon et Son Temps by Roger Peyre (1896).


[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 10, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Why, to shuck peas" ... because the who, what, where, when, and how of shucking peas are self-evident.  From The King's Own by Frederick Marryat and illustrated by Frederick Henry Townsend, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The "Tomte Gubbe," or old man of the homestead, from Peasant Life in Sweden by Llewellyn Lloyd, 1870.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


No News Is Good News (permalink)
"'Nuth'n', says Smith."  From Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain, 1883.
> read more from No News Is Good News . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
The idiom "wearing two [or many] hats" has been traced back to the Civil Service in 1950s England, though we know it actually goes back at least to 1884's A History of the Cries of London, Ancient and Modern by Charles Hindley.

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

"Can we be no more?"  From The White Cat by Ernest Warren, 1882.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 9, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"As she spoke, she dashed the contents of the water-jug she held ... right into the dark corner by the clock."  From The Duchess Lass by Caroline Masters, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The earth," from Coal, Iron, and Oil by Samuel Harries Daddow, 1866.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Robert Greene: His Life and Works by Nikolai Storozhenko, 1881.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Momus suggests that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out.'"
Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

Barefoot by Elin Hilderbrand

Three women step off a plane.  It sounded like the start of a joke.  Suddenly, a shot rings out.

(Thanks, June!)
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of The Lady's Realm magazine.  The caption reads: "Something appeared at the window."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 8, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Silence of Dean Maitland by Maxwell Gray, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to The Fly, from Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Masquers from The National and Domestic History of England by William Hickman Smith Aubrey, 1878.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from a 1900 issue of The Lady's Realm magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 7, 2014

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

In strict accordance with Newton's third law of mechanical toys, every jack-in-the-box triggers an equal but opposite reaction.

[For HBG2 and the Disneyland Haunted Mansion pop-up ghosts.]

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Puzzles and Games (permalink)
The longest tournament chess game took 20 hours and 15 minutes, but we know that one game of chess can actually last a lifetime, as we see in A Boyar of the Terrible by Frederick J. Whishaw, 1896.  The caption reads, "He suddenly died while playing at chess."  See If a Chessman Were a Word: A Chess-Calvino Dictionary.
> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

"Be the elephant you wish to see in the room." —Jacob Wren (via Gary Barwin)

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to that Fawlty Towers scene about life in California: "You can swim and sunbathe, and then after lunch, drive up into the mountains and ski."  From Roughing It by Mark Twain.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Southerly Busters by Ironbark, 1878.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from A Journey Round the World by Carl Marr (1888).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 6, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Ate her cake and drank her tea in a fairyland of enchantment," from Bushigrams by Guy Newell Boothby, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From A Tramp Abroad by Samuel Clemens.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
"Saint Satan," from The New Hyperion by Edward Strahan, 1875.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Meher Baba's "Don't worry, be happy," from Southerly Busters by Ironbark, 1878.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating that no time map, however elegant or compelling, can ever claim to be exclusive or definitive, especially in a society as dynamic as Rome's was in the half millennium before the birth of Christ."
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1887 issue of Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 5, 2014

Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: lunch or dinner?

Clue: This is according to humor historian Christopher Miller.

Answer: Lunch is a funnier word, but breakfast is the funnier meal. (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)

Citation: Christopher Miller, American Cornball
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Seemed to hover in the air," from Ozmar the Mystic by Emeric Hulme Beaman, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Paris Herself Again in 1878-9 by George Augustus Henry Sala, 1880.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.  This should also be of interest: How to Be Your Own Cat.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Momus suggests that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out.'"
Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

Life changes fast.  Life changes in the instant.  You sit down to dinner and life as you know it ends.  Suddenly, a shot rings out.

(Thanks, June!)
> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but a lot of what you say, while it's inspiring, still sounds like a fairy tale."
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Sociable Ghost by Olive Harper (1903).  The caption reads: "Drat that toe! I'm sure I broke it off."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 4, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Again he raised the relic to his lips; the crew of the vessel crumbled into skeletons."  From The Phantom Ship by Frederick Marryat and illustrated by H. R. Millar, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
From Two Knapsacks in the Channel Islands by Jasper Branthwaite and illustrated by Victor Prout, 1897.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Fell in love with him because he always stood in the same place."  From The Works of G. J. Whyte-Melville, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Baby's Museum by Uncle Charlie, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the "Be Our Guest" segment of Disney's Beauty and the Beast, from Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
Don't take this the wrong way ... but is it possible you're imagining all of it?
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 3, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
Beachcomber's By the Way (1931) predicts a religion called "Gaga, Ltd. (see also Neo-Cretinism)," which "rejects belief in sin or hope" and in which "all things exist only in so far as they are self-conscious."
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"'Did you say yes or no?' inquired Newton, who had caught her eye.  'I'll change my mind,' said Isabel, smiling."  From Newton Forster by Frederick Marryat and illustrated by E. Sullivan, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
"Saint Unknown, by the Old Masters," from The Innocents Abroad by Samuel Langhorne Clemens, 1869.

Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


No News Is Good News (permalink)
"I can't a tale unfold," from Thirty-eight Years in India: From Juganath to the Himalaya Mountains by William Tayler, 1881.
> read more from No News Is Good News . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Singin' in the Rain.  The caption reads, "The desolate, black day touched him no more than a summer shadow touches a sunlit sea, for his whole soul was afire with the golden blaze of his song."  From Munsey's Magazine (1920).
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
The fine line between what's close and what's too close.
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from A Ramble Round the Globe by Baron Dewar (1894).  The caption reads: "A gentleman in red."  Speaking of which, what exactly are a snowball's chances in hell?  See A Snowball's Chance in Hell.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 2, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Other branches swooped down, coiling around him."  From The Deviltree of El Dorado by Frank Aubrey, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This "rising young Commercial, named Honeysuckle" reminds us of "somebody else's honeysuckle."  From Two Knapsacks in the Channel Islands by Jasper Branthwaite and illustrated by Victor Prout, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Chinese conjuring extraordinary," from The Book of Ser Marco Polo, the Venetian, Concerning the Kingdoms and Marvels of the East, translated by Henry Yule, 1875.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: What if we know all landscapes that we come across in life? Can anything new happen? (The Hourglass Sanatorium [1973, Poland.])

A: Even given the hypothesis of eternal recurrence, something new can happen, as P. D. Ouspensky explains in his novella Strange Life of Ivan Osokin.

> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The White Wife by Cuthbert Bede (1865).  The caption reads: "The Shaving Spectre."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

November 1, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Noted psychologists try the Realism Test," from The American Legion Weekly [Volume 2, No. 15 (May 7, 1920)].
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This glowing dog manifests itself in Captain Marryat's Novels by Frederick Marryat, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Divinities from Japan and Her People by Andrew Steinmetz, 1859.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Indubitably (?) (permalink)

From Cognitive Science and Psychoanalysis by Kenneth Mark Colby and Robert J. Stoller, 2013.
*If Merriam (or Webster?) is correct that indubitably is not the kind of word that gets used in everyday conversation, except perhaps for humorous effect, then insert comedy drum roll here.
> read more from Indubitably (?) . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The mended ghost": an illustration from The Sociable Ghost by Olive Harper (1903).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest



Page 0 of 828



Original Content Copyright © 2017 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.