CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
December 31, 2014

The Right Word (permalink)

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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From A History of Domestic Manners and Sentiments in England during the Middle Ages by Thomas Wright and illustrated by Frederick William Fairholt, 1862.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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The Right Word (permalink)
"In an atmosphere of Borrioboola-gha."  From Bleak House by Charles Dickens.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
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No News Is Good News (permalink)
"The unfinished entries in the diary."  From Nasby in Exile by David Ross Locke, 1882.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The hand of glory," from The Ingoldsby Legends by Thomas Ingoldsby, 1881.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Do you call this winter?"  From Uncle Chesterton's Heir by Joséphine Blanche Colomb, 1884.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
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December 30, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Now beat me, do beat me," from The Caxtons by Edward Bulwer-Lytton, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Book of Whispers (permalink)
"Anyone who has worked with groups will be aware of [the] phenomenon of a mental field and yet this may only be whispered in respectable scientific circles." —Barbara Dowds, Beyond the Frustrated Self
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.  No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Sledging in a snow-storm," from Siberia in Asia: A Visit to the Valley of the Yenesay in East Siberia by Henry Seebohm, 1882.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"And when we came at last to the five thousand cheeses, my mother burst out crying."  From The Personal History, Adventures, Experience, and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger by Charles Dickens.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A grand monarch and a little yellow imp," from The New Hyperion by Edward Strahan, 1875.  This should also be of interest: How to Believe in Your Elf.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Some of the many tools we use to create Abecedarian (in honor of Teresa Burritt), from Fra Det Moderne Frankrig by Richard Kaufmann, 1882.

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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December 29, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Out of the mouth of the pit ... sprang a vast column of water."  From Heart of the World by Henry Rider Haggard, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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The Right Word (permalink)
Futility Closet reminds us that titivil is the name for "a devil said to collect fragments of words dropped, skipped, or mumbled in the recitation of divine service, and to carry them to hell, to be registered against the offender." [OED]
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Strange Dreams (permalink)
From Midsummer Eve by S. C. Gall, 1870.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"They glared ferociously upon the Americans," from Nasby in Exile by David Ross Locke, 1882.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Tom immediately walked upon his hands to the window, and—if the expression be allowable—looked in with his shoes."  From The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
Momus suggests that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out.'"
Decide for yourself as we alter the opening lines of . . .

Finn by Matthew Olshan

"Angry angry angry, is what you are," they tell me, but I think I'm less angry than quiet, the kind of quiet that makes people nervous because they can't tell what you're thinking, and most of them assume the worst.  Suddenly, a shot rings out.

(Thanks, June!)
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December 28, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
"Keep on keeping on": We can do a bit better than Cassell's Dictionary of Slang, which traces that phrase back to the 1910s.  Consider Charles Haddon Spurgeon back in 1888: "I spoke about the difficulty of keeping on.  'Yes,' answered my friend, 'and it is harder still to keep on keeping on'" (Spurgeon's Gold: New Selections from the Works of C. H. Spurgeon, p. 30).
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to James and the Giant Peach, from The Child World by Gabriel Setoun, 1896.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Sketch-Book of the North by George Eyre Todd and illustrated by Alexander Stuart Boyd, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)

Momus suggests that there are "few tales which would not be improved by the addition of the phrase 'suddenly, a shot rang out.'"
Decide for yourself as we alter the opening line of . . .

Brighton Rock by Graham Greene

Hale knew, before he had been in Brighton three hours, that they meant to murder him.  Suddenly, a shot rang out.

(Thanks, June!)

> read more from Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out . . .
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from Earthquakes by Arnold Boscowitz (1890).  The caption reads: "A family wandering in the snow, to avoid an earthquake shock."
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from an 1885 issue of Arthur's Home magazine.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
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December 27, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to a Peter Lorre caricature, from The Farm Poultry, 1907.  (Peter would have been just three years old at the time.)

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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I cast myself with my face on the dewy earth.  The spirit of Stonehenge was strong upon me!"  From Lavengro; The Scholar, the Gypsy, the Priest by George Henry Borrow, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)

From La Vie à Montmartre by Georges Montorgueil, 1899.

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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration by L. Du Guernier, 1714.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
An illustration from Our Earth and Its Story by Robert Brown (1893).  The caption reads: "Fig. 232 — Aurora borealis observed in Alaska, December 27, 1865."
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
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December 26, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Pride shall be overthrown," from By-Roads and Battle-Fields in Picardy by George Musgrave, 1861.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"Everybody had an excuse," from A Tramp Abroad by Mark Twain, 1897.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"From these strange essences of life / May crystallize the white pearl which I seek!"  From Symphonie Symbolique by Edmund John and illustrated by Stella Langdale, 1919.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The caption reads, "If you will give me home in your oven I will see to the baking of your bread."  From The Necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and Other Stories by Mary De Morgan, 1886.  This should also be of interest: How to Believe in Your Elf.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The sphinx, drawn from memory (apparently).  From Lehrbuch der Geschichte der alten Welt by Emylie Doering, 1880.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1888 issue of Punch magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 25, 2014

This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Yuletide" is an anagram of "Yeti duel."

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Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:
"Christmas tree" is an anagram of "Hermetic stars."
This will also be of interest: The Collected Lost Meanings of Christmas.

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
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Disguised as a Christmas Tree (permalink)
"He looked like a tree would if a tree looked like her husband, or her husband if he looked like a tree."

"Sam, please, I have no more time to be a Christmas tree": a moment from the classic sitcom Bewitched.
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Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)

Jonathan Caws-Elwitt shares a deleted scene from A Christmas Carol:

Behold! I am the Spirit in which the things you didn't take in the spirit in which they were intended... were intended.

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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Gryll Grange by George Edward Bateman Saintsbury (1896).  The caption reads: "He was recalled to himself by sinking up to his shoulders in a hollow."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1888 issue of Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours magazine.  The caption reads: "'Ring on!' he exclaimed, as the bells from many a church-dome rang out their merriest Christmas chime."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 24, 2014

The Right Word (permalink)

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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" -- the proposal occurred 52 years earlier, as we see in the Daily Colonist, 1900.  This will also be of interest: The Collected Lost Meanings of Christmas.

> read more from Precursors . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Bachelor's Christmas by Robert Grant (1895).  The caption reads: "The wreaths of holly were the nearest semblance to faces, and they seemed almost to grin at him."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Bachelor's Christmas by Robert Grant (1895).  The caption reads: "Alone in his bachelor quarters on Christmas Eve."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from an 1884 issue of Puck magazine.  The caption reads: "His Christmas Prayer: 'Oh! — — — —!'"  This will also be of interest: The Collected Lost Meanings of Christmas.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Under the Mistletoe": an illustration from an 1885 issue of Little Wide Awake magazine.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Five Little Peppers and How They Grew by Margaret Sidney (1909).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 23, 2014

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)

Someone should write an autobiography entitled, The Point I was Trying to Make All Along.  [Inspired by Jeff Hawkins.]

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The Right Word (permalink)

Our anagram recalls that episode of Seinfeld in which George tires of office Christmas parties and saves money by giving everyone a certificate that a donation has been made in their name to the (fictitious) Human Fund:

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Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
"Seven or eight times they passed through the fire," from The Dacoit's Treasure by Henry Charles Moore, 1897.
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Disguised as a Christmas Tree (permalink)
"When he returned from the ammo bunker, he looked like a Christmas tree with grenades, smoke canisters, and ammo bandoliers hanging all over him." —Jay Taylor, Point of Aim, Point of Impact
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Never shall I forget the repulsive sight that met my eye as I turned round."  From The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to 'We are all Santa' and 'Your face here,' from Some Account of Colton and of the De Wasteney's Family by Frederick Perrot Parker (1897).  The caption reads: "St. Nicholas."
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December 22, 2014

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

This anagram is in honor of Gary Barwin's The Porcupinity of the Stars.

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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
This elf below was returned back in 1896, but the things he learned while away!

Speaking of elves, see our unbelievably elf-centered publication, How to Believe in Your Elf. Its first review comes from G. Struijker Boudier in the Netherlands:

My ratings are always based on how much energy a product generates in me. Sometimes the trigger is usefulness, at other times it's the production quality or other things. That means that I ignore aspects of the product that aren't relevant to my focus.

In this case, the four stars are based on the fact that this book makes me muse about myself and my life and makes me smile at the same time.

I'm a nut for off beat playfulness that balances between nonsense and seriousness. This book (as well as most book by Prof. Oddfellow) does just that. Obviously the 'One's elf/Oneself' is the running theme here. I can see how you can look at it as lame wordplay. To me it isn't. Something weird happens if you place your personality traits, ego and whatnot in the elf of your choice. One separates one's elf from oneself. Distancing yourself from yourself is always a good way to see bigger pictures and wonder about why you're behaving the way you're behaving. It opens up new possibilities and ideas.

Some examples:
What you do not wish done to your elf, do not to another.
Maturity consists of no longer being taken in by one’s elf.
If you be not pleased, put your hand in your pocket and please your elf.
Listen at the key hole, and you’ll hear news of your elf.

Can't help it, I just like this kind of lighthearted play with words, sense and nonsense that sometimes strikes an unexpected chord.

Meanwhile, allow us to recall this timely joke by scalawag Jonathan Caws-Elwitt:

Q: What do you call an urban elf?
A: A metrognome.

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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It's Really Happening (permalink)
"I'm not really sure at what point it's going to kick in that it's really happening— I'll let you know!"

The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Aurora transformed herself into a cavalier," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Somewhile in hell," from Broadway Ballads by Abel Reid (a.k.a. William James Linton), 1876.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
From Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.

There's a macabre old fairy tale about an animated fireplace poker entitled "The Cinder King."  The story's syntax is antiquated, but the plot is simple (if fantastic).  A sobbing woman named Betty watches the fireplace, expecting either purses of money or coffins to fly out.  It seems that Betty had recently been jilted by her lover, a tailor named Bob Scott.  He took another bride to the altar, so Betty has resolved to woo the dark Cinder King for his riches.  The clock is about to chime the hour of one, and the moment is described very evocatively: spent tallow-candle grease is seeping into the floor, a blue-burning lamp has wasted half its oil, a black beetle comes crawling from afar, and the red coals of the fire are sinking beneath their grate.  Betty's life is clearly descending to the Underworld.  When the clock strikes "one," it's not the cuckoo bird who sings but rather a grim raven.  Betty's cat wakes up but keeps its claws retracted.  The jack [which we here interpret as the figure of the man striking the bell on the clock] falls into a bowl as if it's time to dine.  The earth trembles, and as if empowered by the fuel of Hell, the fireplace poker animates in a burst of flame.  It shoots forth an enormous cinder that hisses three times like a serpent.  Where the cinder lands there appears a large coffin containing a "nondescript thing."  The thing croaks for Betty to embrace her true Cinder King, noting that three more kings (his brothers) are also waiting to greet her and will, at four o'clock, eat her.  He explains that he and his "element brothers" have a feast and a wedding every night and that they devour each other's new wives.  Betty begs not to wed, but cinders crunch in her mouth and cascade upon her head.  She sinks into the coffin, strewn with cinders, never to be seen again.


THE CINDER KING
by Anon., c. 1801

Who is it that sits in the kitchen and weeps,
While tick goes the clock, and the tabby-cat sleeps, —
That watches the grate, without ceasing to spy,
Whether purses or coffins will out of it fly?

'Tis Betty; who saw the false tailor, Bob Scott,
Lead a bride to the altar; which bride she was not.
'Tis Betty; determined, love from her to fling,
And woo, for his riches, the dark Cinder-King.

Now spent tallow-candle-grease fattened the soil,
And the blue-burning lamp had half wasted its oil,
And the black-beetle boldly came crawling from far,
And the red coals were sinking beneath the third bar;

When "one!" struck the clock — and instead of the bird
Who used to sing cuckoo whene'er the clock stirred,
Out burst a grim raven, and uttered "caw! caw!"
While Puss, though she woke, durst not put forth a claw.

Then the jack fell a-going as if one should sup,
Then the earth rocked as though it would swallow one up;
With fuel from Hell, a strange coal-scuttle came,
And a self-handled poker made fearful the flame.

A cinder shot from it, of size to amaze,
(With a bounce, such as Betty ne'er heard in her days,)
Thrice, serpent-like, hissed as its heat fled away,
And, lo! something dark in a vast coffin lay!

"Come, Betty," quoth croaking that nondescript thing,
"Come, bless the fond arms of your true Cinder-King!
Three more Kings, my brothers, are waiting to greet ye,
Who — don't take it ill — must at four o'clock eat ye.

"My darling, it must be! do make up your mind;
We element brothers, united, and kind,
Have a feast and a wedding, each night of our lives,
So constantly sup on each other's new wives."

In vain squalled the cook-maid, and prayed not to wed;
Cinder crunched in her mouth, cinder rained on her head.
She sank in the coffin with cinders strewn o'er,
And coffin nor Betty saw man any more.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
In came the Christmas goat, from Svenska Minnen och Bilder by Nils Petrus Ödman (1899).  This will also be of interest: The Collected Lost Meanings of Christmas.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 21, 2014

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

This anagram is in honor of Jonathan Caws-Elwitt's The Can of Yams.

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Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
"You see the light spread," from Gilbert Light Experiments for Boys, 1920.
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Precursors (permalink)

Here's a precursor to the space-folding "Holtzman Effect" from Frank Herbert's Dune universe (1965), as seen in Jeanne d'Arc et la Normandie au XVme Siècle by Albert Sarrazin, 1896.

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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I conducted her to the chamber, and bade her look intently on the polished mirror of the wall," from The Sphinx-like Head by J. Harry Sugden, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From America Revisited by George Augustus Henry Fairfield, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"'That is a black shadow to be following the girl,' said Steerforth, standing still; 'What does it mean?'"  From The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Svenska Minnen och Bilder by Nils Petrus Ödman (1899).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 20, 2014

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

This anagram is in honor of Martha Brockenbrough's The Game of Love and Death.

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A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
From My Northern Exposure: The Kawa At the Pole by Walter E. Traprock, 1922.  Thanks, Jonathan Caws-Elwitt!

A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
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Book of Whispers (permalink)
"I could not distinguish what he said," from The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells, 1896.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"It had come, the thing she asked, and now she could not face it; it was too much, too terrible."  From A Charge to Keep by P. A. Blyth, 1896.

As we learn in The Cat in the Hat, when we invite a Thing in, we may end up with more than we bargained for [Thing Two, to be exact].
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Midwinter comes tomorrow," from Songs of Three Centuries by John Greenleaf Whittier, 1877.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
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Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)

A candle from The Baby's Museum by Uncle Charlie, 1882.
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December 19, 2014

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: If the card game Pokemon has its own theme tune, why not Go Fish?
A: Why not, indeed!  And here's our solution, with mp3 and libretto:


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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From the Dept. of Life Lessons in David Lynch Films:

While fever-dreaming down your own Lost Highway, if you encounter a Mr. Eddy/Dick Laurent equivalent who offers you pornographic material, don't politely decline, because then you might learn that the Alice Wakefield in your life doubles as a Renee Madison, and you'll save yourself a headache of epic proportions.

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Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
You've heard of the optional Oxford comma, but do you know about the permissive Ottoman comma?  It can be removed with surgical precision.  For example, the caption below seemingly refers to "Turkish boy women," and we must say that the blue pencil is flattering.  From Turkey and the Turks; being the present state of the Ottoman Empire by John Reid, 1840.

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Nonsense Dept. (permalink)

"Brown, our one earnest member, begged us to be reasonable, and reminded us, not for the first time, and not, perhaps, altogether unnecessarily, that these meetings were for the purpose of discussing business, not of talking nonsense."
Jerome K. Jerome, Novel Notes

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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"At the banquet the guests in amazement were lost," from The Lion's Masquerade, 1807.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the tacky tourist postcard culture of Florida, from Camping and Cruising in Florida by James Alexander Henshall, 1884.
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December 18, 2014

This May Surprise You (permalink)
You've heard it said that people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones, but—as we see in this plan of the original Glass House, they can safely throw lumps of coal.  (Note the "Coal Hole" door facing the river.)  From Local Collections; or Records of Remarkable Events Connected with the Borough of Gateshead, 1837-1839.

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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

This anagram is in honor of recording artist extraordinaire Ken Clinger's Bovine Productions.  Ken is profiled here as "one of the most distinctive and identifiable" underground musicians ever.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"We have sealed the doom of the King of Spades," from The Trail of the Serpent by M. E. Braddon, 1861.  [For Gordon Meyer.]
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
From Hugh Trebarwith, A Cornish Romance by Edward Foskett, 1900.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Man in the Moon, Vol. IV.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
We found independent confirmation that there are more of them in the C.  From Voyage au Pays des Bachi-Bouzoucks by Ivan de Woestyne de Grammez de Wardes, 1876.
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December 17, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
Drew Mackey noticed a precursor to the world of Super Mario in the world of Kandinsky.

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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

Our anagram is in honor of Gordon Meyer's delightful book of photographs, Las Vegas: Underfoot.
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
Here's King Arthur's round table, from The Book of South Wales, the Wye, and the Coast by Samuel Carter Hall, 1861.
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This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
Gerald Metcalfe's frontispiece for Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Poems (1907).
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
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Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
"I raised my gun, and then—"  From Blossoms by the Way by Carrie Adelaide Cooke, 1882.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Counting up time—which is money," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration by Lawrence Chaves (1932) for de Quincey's Opium Eater.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A Séance on the Ice": an illustration from The Children's Fairy History of England by Forbes Edward Winslow (1889).  The caption reads: "What!  Mesmerise you on the ice!  Well, I never!  Did any one ever hear of such a thing?  Oh, you all want it, do you?  Well, I will try.  You need not take off your skates.  I will mesmerise you skating, and we will be here, and there, and everywhere, at the same time.  Just come close round me and look at me; don't speak, simply watch my hands. * * * * * * *"
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 16, 2014

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We designed this plate with a vintage map of Saint Augustine, Florida, complete with mischievous mermaid.  Our map is meticulously accurate, but (forbid!) not in a literal way.  Though you can navigate by it, it’s not to what la-di-da cartographers would call "scale."



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No News Is Good News (permalink)
"I became once more the silent tomb."  From Baboo Jabberjee, B.A. by J. Bernard Partridge, 1897.
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the film Carry On Camping (1969), from All about Ramsgate and Broadstairs (1870).  The caption reads, "The gentleman who spends the morning near the ladies' bathing machines."
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to David Lynch's Twin Peaks, from A Voyage in the 'Sunbeam' by Annie Brassey, 1878.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The tragedy," from The Ingoldsby Legends by Thomas Ingoldsby, 1881.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Winter-Time": an illustration from The Jorrocks Edition by Facey Romford (1892).
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Across the Border by Edward Emmerson Oliver (1890).  The caption reads: "The Flying Throne of Star-taught Sulaimân."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 15, 2014

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

"There is no string around a ghost's finger." —William Keckler

Part of the context:

Death must be a ghost's second childhood.
It wanders far like a kite, then the string breaks.
It abandons the human form's cold bathtub.
There is no string around a ghost's finger.

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Lyon Pittoresque by Auguste Bleton, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A human tarantula," from Our Sister Republic by Albert S. Evans, 1870.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Seated on an upright tombstone, close to him, was a strange unearthly figure, etc."  From The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Daylight and darkness," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the Major Domo character from the film Captain Eo (1986), from Monographien Zur Deutschen Kulturgeschichte by Georg Steinhausen, 1899.  (Major Domo photo via Prop Store.)

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December 14, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"A tongue of pale blue flame shivered on the truck of the mast," from Ia by Q. [A. T. Quiller-Couch], 1896.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"He passed whole mornings in his study, immersed in gloomy reverie, stalking about the room in his nightcap."  From Nightmare Abbey by Thomas Love Peacock, 1818.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"Le genie de l'isle Percé," from Canada From the Lakes to the Gulf by Captain Mac, 1881.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Snarleyyow by Frederick Marryat (1897).  The caption reads: "Vanslyperken bent over the cur and kissed it again and again."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 13, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Heroes of the Dawn by Violet Russell, 1914.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
"Ah yes, the good ol' pull-the-tablecloth-off-the-table-without-sending-dishes-flying routine. The oldest trick in the book? Possibly." —Jeremy Korzeniewski

Our vintage illustration appears in Funny Books for Boys and Girls, 1856.
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Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)
Q: "Are all parents incurably mad?" —Rudyard Kipling, Stalky & Co.
A: "Not all parents are crazy, even if it seems that way sometimes. ('About 20% of parents fall into the lunatic fringe.' —Edes Gilbert, headmaster, the Spence School.)" —What Matters Most for School Leaders
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The miraculous head, from La Russie et Les Russes by Victor Tissot, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The Sphinx, drawn from memory (apparently), from Observations in the East, Chiefly in Egypt, Palestine, Syria, and Asia Minor by John Price Durbin (1845).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Have you noticed that in some books flocks of swallows are flying between the verses?  Stanzas of swallows.  You should learn to read from the flight of these birds."  This we learn in The Hourglass Sanatorium (1973, Poland), a dreamy film about bending time, the nature of death, eternal recurrence, and the atrocities of World War II.

Compare this to Gary Barwin's piece, below.
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December 12, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

From Voyage aux Pyrénées, Troisième édition by Hippolyte Adolphe Taine and illustrated by Gustave Doré, 1860.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Festival of Song by Frederick Saunders, 1866.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Man in the Moon, Volume IV.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
From The Nightingale by Richard André, 1899.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

The sphinx drawn from memory (apparently), from Ziemia Święta i Islam czyli szkice z pielgrzymki do Ziemi Świętej by Józef Sebastian Pelczar, 1875.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"Everyone always mistakes everyone for someone else." —Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, The Letter Killers Club (highly recommended!)
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December 11, 2014

Rhetorical Questions, Answered! (permalink)

Q: I still remember a can of "sunlight" some long-dead relative sent to my mom as a gag gift. She put it away in a dark drawer. What else can you do with such a gift? —William Keckler

A: Pair the can of sunlight with a basket of kisses as a gift to Rhoda "The Bad Seed" Penmark.


> read more from Rhetorical Questions, Answered! . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Annie Dillard's Teaching a Stone to Talk (1982), from St. Nicholas magazine (1915).  The text reads, "Is a stone alive?"
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Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

The text reads, "Each pea in a pod is engirdled by an imaginary line corresponding to the great circles of our celestial sphere.  This can be verified by anyone who wishes to take the trouble."

Our piece was inspired by an illustration in Illustrated British Ballads, Old and New, 1894.  Its caption reads, "Now when they got as far as the equator, they'd nothing left but one split pea."  That pea must have been split equatorially, eh?
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
La reine Marguerite and René Magritte, though this isn't either of them.

> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
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Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
Giving a warning too late to be of any help.  It's the oldest trick in the book.  The caption reads, "Take care, Mr. Malone, the stairs are slippery."  From Shirley by Charlotte Brontë, 1897.
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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We laud so many discoverers, but the discoverer of grapes surely deserves rhapsodies.  From Our Country by Benson John Lossing, 1875.

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
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December 10, 2014

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook.  [Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiring this one.  The hyphenated luminaries are, of course, in his honor.]

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"It removed my veil from its gaunt head, rent it in two parts, and, flinging both on the floor, trampled on them."  From Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë and illustrated by Frederick Henry Townsend, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
"You haven't got such a thing as a cigar?" reads the caption.

Our answer: "No, I'm partial to Camels."

From The Tragedy of the Korosko by Arthur Conan Doyle, 1898.
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to invitation-only blogs.  "He called aloud to me not to disturb his webs," from Gulliver's Travels.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 9, 2014

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"The New-York Anti-Orange-Peel and Banana-Skin Association, as they appear in their great humanitarian feat of clearing the side-walks."  From Punchinello, April 9, 1870.  [Via literary scalawag Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.]  [Notice all those hyphens in the caption.  Under a microscope, each hyphen is, in turn, a miniature orange peel and banana skin.]

> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
In this still from The Heart, She Holler (season three), we learn that "the impossible is possible if the reality that you are in creates another reality where the reality created in that reality creates that very reality that in and of itself created that first reality.  If they create each other then anything can happen."
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)

From Voyage aux Pyrénées by Hippolyte Adolphe Taine and illustrated by Gustave Doré, 1860.

*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Comic History of the United States by John D. Sherwood, 1870.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the buffet sneeze guard, from The Prince of Wales' Tour by William Howard Russell, 1877.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The Sisters": an illustration from Arthur's Home Magazine (1865).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 8, 2014

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The sublime absurdist playwright N. F. Simpson offers the best explanation we've encountered for how there are no rational grounds for rationalism and how belief in reason is pure superstition.  The following magnificence comes to us from If So, Then Yes:

The idolatry of reason indeed has a lot to answer for.  In the interests of reason, and pursuant on an enthusiastic and cocksure gullibility so fathomlessly idiotic that only the witlessly sophisticated can succumb to it, the world has been handed over irreversibly, lock, stock and barrel, to the sorcerer's apprentice.  For we belong, ladies and gentlemen, whether we like it or not, to a species so idiotically infatuated with itself as to act in perpetual disregard of its own fallibility.  In religion, in philosophy, in politics and now in science, together with its handmaiden, technology — which, both in themselves and in the ethos to which they give rise, combine all the fatuities of the other three with even grosser ones of their own — we luxuriate in abject folly.  A word for this folly already, as you must know, exists.  It is hubris.  But hubris is built into the human psyche, and there is no escape from it for any of us.  The fool, fixed in his folly, may think he can turn the wheel on which he turns, as it has been well expressed.  The best that in the light of this any of us can do is to turn aside from time to time as occasion offers from the brash and mindless pursuit of progress, and light a small candle to doubt and uncertainty, to mystery and awe and wonder and humility.  Or, if that should seem a wanton waste of good candle-grease, then to one or other of those more unassuming little certainties which, equally daft though they may be, are so much less stultifyingly dreary and destructive than the grandiose banalities behind which we all go marching, with bands playing and Professor Dawkins leading the way with boyish enthusiasm, faster and faster towards the abyss.

It was Wittgenstein, was it not, ladies and gentlemen, who remarked that to be religious is to know that the facts of the world are not the end of the matter.  There are, as John Cooper Powys among others so clearly saw, abysses of being and reality totally outside this "pinfold", in which, as Milton says, we are confined, adding that all the great urges of our spirit come nearest to the secret of the universe when they enjoy nature with the detachment of the pilgrim rather than analyse her with the curiosity of a scientist.  Any imaginative illusion, he goes on, by which a person half lives, any mythology in which a person half believes, is truer in the only sense in which truth matters, than the most authenticated scientific facts.  For scientific facts are the pabulum of the rational mind.  But the rational mind, ladies and gentlemen, is so irrational as to proceed with bland confidence on the basis of the unprovable, and therefore rationally untenable, assumption that the human brain is fully equipped to handle whatever the cosmos can throw at it.  The concept of unknowability, for which God has always been a convenient shorthand term, does not, even as a concept, begin to come within its remit.  But there are no rational grounds for the assumption that a consciousness which functions in such and such a way prevents a more valid picture of the universe than one which, functioning in some other, radically different, way, gives a correspondingly different picture.  Or that the brain of a man, though certainly larger and seemingly more complex than that of those other organisms, such as, let us say, the octopus, the slow-worm and the chimpanzee, with which he happens by chance to have become acquainted, vulnerable as it is to all manner of substances and other influences by which its functioning can be, and frequently is, radically altered, is necessarily presenting him at any given time with a uniquely definitive interpretation of the phenomena seemingly confronting it.  Or that what by virtue of it we perceive as the truth today is of more or less validity than what was perceived as the truth yesterday, or two thousand years ago; or than what will be perceived as the truth tomorrow, or in two thousand years' time.  The temporal parochialism in which we are all cribbed, cabined and confined blinds us to the fact that, as Kant has pointed out to us, space and time mark the limits of our human minds rather than those of the universe.  It is to the eminent biometrist, the late J.B.S. Haldane, that we are indebted for the observation that the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but, in his own words, "queerer than we can suppose."  For, as we learn from Holy Writ, God is not merely unknown, but unknowable.  A concept expressed in a slightly different form by Nietzsche, whose contention it was that all we can know of the world is the world as it appears to us.  H.P.G. Wells, likewise, reminds us that neither the pig's snout nor the human brain have been evolved for the purpose of discerning the ultimate truth of things.  It is well that it be borne in mind, however, that the arguments I and they have so persuasively deployed, together with those of others who take a contrary view, have been arrived at by means of the very instrument we are showing to be an unreliable one.  There are, in short, no rational grounds for reliance on the rational.  Belief in the paramountcy of reason is purest superstition.

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Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

Photo by Amorette Dye.
The patron saint of sweet potatoes lies in wait for Thanksgiving.  —William Keckler (paraphrased)
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"My eye was caught by the appearance of an extraordinary figure." From Ghostly Tales by Wilhelmina Fitzclarence, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"We were both very unhappy in those days," from The Romance of Mary Sain by C. H. Cochran Patrick, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"And the quiet lake shall feel / The torpid touch of his glazing breath, and ring to the skater's heel."  From Winter Pictures by Poet and Artist, engraved by Edward Whymper, 1881.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
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It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"It bears repeating that eating and dieting can be affected by things that seemingly have no connection to them."
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December 7, 2014

Precursors (permalink)
Here's the immortal Christopher Lee eleven years before he faked his birth.  From Shakespeare on the Stage by William Winter, 1911.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I did not like reviewing at all—it was not to my taste."  From Lavengro; the Scholar, the Gypsy, the Priest by George Henry Borrow, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"I believe I was treading a fine line between being the helpful 'voice of reason' and being a harsh 'get it together and smell the coffee' voice of reality."
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Paris Herself Again in 1878-9 by George Agustus Henry Fairfield, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"Cruelty," from Harper's Weekly, 1885.

   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"The most awful thing is that we become resigned to everything."
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December 6, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"When grammar tires and sums are hard," from Sedbergh School Songs, written and illustrated by Ralph St. John Ainslie, 1896.  This should also be of interest: How to Believe in Your Elf.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"There is a fine line between being open and being tiresome."
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The giant radish," from Our Autumn Holiday on French Rivers by James Lynam Molloy and illustrated by Liunley Sambourne, 1874.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From the Works of Charles Dickens, New Illustrated Library Edition.  The caption reads: "Mysterious appearance of the gentleman in the small-clothes."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 5, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's some vintage furniture paranoia, from The Duchess Lass by Caroline Masters, 1896.  The caption reads, "With a furtive glance round the room, as though she felt that the very furniture itself might rise up as witness against her."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

From Voyage aux Pyrénées by Hippolyte Adolphe Taine and illustrated by Gustave Doré, 1860.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Do I look like a rabbit, sir?"  From The Tame Fox and Other Sketches by G. Finch Mason, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds, from The Western World by William Henry Giles Kingston, 1874.  The caption reads, "A cloud of pigeons."
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Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
From A Dash for a Throne by Arthur Williams Marchmont, 1899.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Experiences of Loveday Brooke, Lady Detective by Catharine Louisa Pirkis (1894).  The caption reads: "He was still pale."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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December 4, 2014

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Of truth in things false, from Proverbial Philosophy by Martin Farquhar Tupper, 1867.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Baby's Museum by Uncle Charlie, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Colorful Allusions (permalink)
If he "killed brown every night," did he wake up with a black eye?  From Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain, 1883.
* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Fanny's new physician," from The Oxford Thackeray.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Hollywood's favorite fake lounge act, The Lampshades, from Young Americans in Japan by Edward Greey, 1882.
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Strange Dreams (permalink)
An illustration from Our Young Folks (1873).  The caption reads: "Jacky and the Sleep Angel."
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
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December 3, 2014

Puzzles and Games :: Which is Funnier (permalink)
Which is funnier: a tuba or a French horn?

Clue: This is according to humor historian Christopher Miller.

Answer: a tuba is funnier (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)

Citation: Christopher Miller, American Cornball
(Thanks to Jonathan Caws-Elwitt for inspiration!)
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Writing with a forked pen an oracle on sand," from Social Life of the Chinese by Justus Doolittle, 1867.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I know that I yearned," from America Revisited by George Augustus Henry Fairfield, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Gargantua and Pantagruel by Rabelais.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Henry Bouquet as depicted in History of the County of Westmoreland, Pennsylvania by George Dallas Albert, 1882.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The vast dim sphinx / Broods over all from its immobile throne," from Symphonie Symbolique by Edmund John and illustrated by Stella Langdale, 1919.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Otto of the Silver Hand, written and illustrated by Howard Pyle (1888).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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December 2, 2014

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)

From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook.  [Inspired by and for William Keckler.]  The text reads, "It would be wrong of us to interrupt the cat seance."  This should also be of interest: How to Be Your Own Cat.

Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Kulturgeschichte by Friedrich Anton Heller von Hellwald, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
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On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"You let me pay. It's the least I can do for all your help." —Treason's Reward by Annay Dawson
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
"This may surprise you, but something else I believe is essential in this battle is humor."
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Oldest Tricks in the Book (permalink)
How the journal was written — a word at a time (oldest trick in the book).  From A Voyage in the 'Sunbeam' by Annie Brassey, 1878.
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Strange Dreams (permalink)
"My dream," from Alter Ejusdem by James Archibald Sidey, 1877.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
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December 1, 2014

The Right Word (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook.  For Jeff Hawkins.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Now the moment for the giving of the Sign had come," from The Romance of Golden Star by George Chetwynd Griffith Jones, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Les magiciens," from A Travers l'Afrique by Verney Lovett Cameron, 1878.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Picket Pin and His Friends by Price Collier (1894).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
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Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out (permalink)
An illustration from an 1885 issue of Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours magazine.
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