CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
Featured Book
The Young Wizard's Hexopedia
Search Site
Interactive

Breathing Circle
Music Box Moment
Cautious or Optimistic
King of Hearts of War and Peace
As I Was, As I Am
Perdition Slip
Loves Me? Loves Me Not?
Wacky Birthday Form
Test Your ESP
Chess-Calvino Dictionary
Amalgamural
Is Today the Day?
100 Ways I Failed to Boil Water
"Follow Your Bliss" Compass
"Fortune's Navigator" Compass
Inkblot Oracle
Luck Transfer Certificate
Eternal Life Coupon
Honorary Italian Grandmother E-card
Simple Answers

Collections

A Fine Line Between...
A Rose is a ...
Always Remember
Ampersands
Annotated Ellipses
Apropos of Nothing
Book of Whispers
Call it a Hunch
Colorful Allusions
Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up?
Disguised as a Christmas Tree
Do-Re-Midi
Don't Take This the Wrong Way
Everybody's Doing This Now
Forgotten Wisdom
Glued Snippets
Go Out in a Blaze of Glory
Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore
How to Believe in Your Elf
I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought
Images Moving Through Time
Indubitably (?)
Inflationary Lyrics
It Bears Repeating
It's Really Happening
Last Dustbunny in the Netherlands
Miscellanies of Mr. Jonathan
Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led
No News Is Good News
Non-Circulating Books
Nonsense Dept.
Not Rocket Science
Oldest Tricks in the Book
On One Condition
One Mitten Manager
Only Funny If ...
P I n K S L i P
Peace Symbols to Color
Pfft!
Phosphenes
Precursors
Presumptive Conundrums
Puzzles and Games
Constellations
D-ictionary
Film-ictionary
Letter Grids
Tic Tac Toe Story Generator
Which is Funnier
Restoring the Lost Sense
Rhetorical Answers, Questioned
Rhetorical Questions, Answered!
Semicolon Moons
Semicolon's Dream Journal
Simple Answers
Someone Should Write a Book on ...
Something, Defined
Staring at the Sun
Staring Into the Depths
Strange Dreams
Suddenly, A Shot Rang Out
Telescopic Em Dashes
The 40 Most Meaningful Things
The Ghost In The [Scanning] Machine
The Only Certainty
The Right Word
This May Surprise You
This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea
Two Sides / Same Coin
Uncharted Territories
Unicorns
What's In a Name
Yearbook Weirdness
Yesterday's Weather
Your Ship Will Come In

Archives

July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006

Links

Magic Words
Jonathan Caws-Elwitt
Martha Brockenbrough
Gordon Meyer
Dr. Boli
Serif of Nottingblog
dbqp
Phantasmaphile
Joe Brainard's Pyjamas
Ironic Sans
Brian Sibley's Blog
Neat-o-Rama
Abecedarian personal effects of 'a mad genius'
A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
January 31, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"You must have plenty of ghosts in Greek and Latin, doctor."  From Gryll Grange by Thomas Love Peacock and illustrated by Frederick Henry Townsend, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Captain Marryat's Novels by Frederick Marryat, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
Lancaster Rose"A rose may be a rose, but children are not children." —Mary Jane Drummond, Assessing Children's Learning

How so?

Answer: Children are a heterogeneous crowd of unique individuals, onto whom we project our understanding of what it is to be four – or seven – or 11 years old. (The answer is in black text on the black background. Highlight it to view.)
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
To date we've never been menaced by books.  The artist could at least have magnified bookworms to dragon-like proportions.

From Verses for Grannie by S. Middleton Fox, 1899.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Imagination and Freewill, from Cassell's Library of English Literature, edited by Henry Morley, 1875.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 30, 2015

Someone Should Write a Book on ... (permalink)
Dan suggests a book someone should write:

I wonder if anyone has taken the trouble to catalogue English verbs that are used both transitively and intransitively and which exhibit a substantial difference in meaning between the two. "He drinks tea." "He drinks." That sort of thing. For all I know, that's the case with most of them, and the catalogue would be a weighty volume. Transitive verbs are apparently an irresistible source for neologisms. You just check to see whether an intransitive form exists and is doing anything in particular. No? Dude, that's low-hanging fruit. "He walked"; i.e., "He was acquitted." I'm not sure when that one first appeared, but I suspect it's modern. If I were going to waste my time on such a book, I'd print the intransitive expression on the right page, with a transitive continuation on the next page (following an ellipsis, perhaps). It would be an entertaining read, as you could almost physically feel the shift in meaning as you turned the page, and besides, some of them are quite whimsical. "They parked." A young lady's virtue hangs in the balance. Turn the page.  "...the car." She remains intacto. Even more fun would be a collection of transitive verbs currently lacking an intransitive use but listed as if they did, and letting the imagination land where it may. Practically poetry. "He brings." Roll it around on the tongue. Suggests to me a generous and helpful type of person. "I like Fred. He brings, you know?" "Yeah, I know what you mean. The world needs more bringers."

> read more from Someone Should Write a Book on ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the Ghostbusters theme (with the catchphrase, "I ain't afraid of no ghost"), from Thrilling Life Stories for the Masses, 1892.  The caption reads, "'I'm not afraid of no old ghostesses,' said Harold."
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Ingoldsby Legends by Thomas Ingoldsby, 1866.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
Asclepius [Aesculapius] originated as a sideshow attraction.  This we find documented in The Comic History of Rome by Gilbert Abbott A'Beckett, 1897.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Staring at the Sun (permalink)
"The ship that sailed into the sun," from Lilliput Lyrics by William Brighty Rands, 1899.
> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Ill-fame and innocence" from The New Hyperion by Edward Strahan, 1875.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 29, 2015

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
From In the Forbidden Land by Arnold Henry Savage Landor, 1898.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"His eyes rested on a form that made his blood run cold."  From The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Can you guess Major Twiggs' branch of the military?  From The History of Mexico and Its Wars by John Frost, 1882.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A poetical ruin," from Love Lyrics and Valentine Verses by Charles Maurice Davies, 1875.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
An illustration from an 1855 issue of Punch magazine.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 28, 2015

Puzzles and Games (permalink)
In the game Grand Theft Auto V, members of a Scientology-like cult called Epsilon pray to the god Kifflom. We can offer an internet exclusive in answering "What does Kifflom mean?" The sounds of Kifflom, spoken backwards, intone the word malefic (from the Latin meaning ill-doing).  Note that the "kiff" at the beginning of Kifflom is the "fic" of malefic, backwards.  The "lom" at the end of the Kifflom is the the "mal" at the beginning of malefic.  



There is actually a long history of such word reversals.  Consider, for example, the reversals of:

Tien (heaven in Chinese) into Neit (Egyptian goddess)

Mitra (Persian Venus) into Artim (the Greek Artimis)

Rama (love in Sanscrit) into Amor (love in Latin)

Dipuc (love in Sanscrit) into Cupid (Latin)

Chlom (crown in Coptic) into Moloch (king in Hebrew)

Sar (chief in Persian) into Ras (chief in Arabic and Hebrew)

Additionally, Melos refers to "the fearful sword of fire" that descends from "the gate of light," a coded reference to Christ in Abyssinian liturgical texts.  King Solomon, who figured highly in Ethiopian mythology, is said to have considered Melos to be a magic word.[1]  Note that Melos is a form of the name Solomon.  Solomon spelled backwards is Nomolos, which shortens to Molos and hence Melos.  (Another common variation is Nemlos.[2])


[1] Phillip Tovey, Inculturation of Christian Worship (2004)

[2] Alois Grillmeier, Christ in Christian Tradition (1975)

> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"A snow-wave in Cheshire.  Sketched from nature, January 28, 1865, after a strong breeze of wind."  From Frost and Fire by John Francis Campbell, 1867.

Jonathan Caws-Elwitt observes, "I like the way the village depicted under the tidal wave of snow sort of looks like it's preserved in an anti-snowglobe."
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The crystal ball turned inky black."  From Strange Stories, April 1939.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Nonsense Dept. (permalink)
"Random rubbish," from Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain, 1883.
> read more from Nonsense Dept. . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Baby's Museum by Uncle Charlie, 1882.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 27, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

"He is here now. Wicked doubter—beware!"  From The Land of the Living Dead by Neal Fyne, 1897.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"They danced in the moonlight on the sward," from Bladys of the Stewponey by Sabine Baring-Gould and illustrated by Frederick Henry Townsend, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


On One Condition (permalink)
Yes, you may . . . on one condition:

"Go to yonder point where the mountain ends and jump down from the precipice." —Perfect Relationship: Guru and Disciple
> read more from On One Condition . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I was touched," from Roughing It by Mark Twain.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
Clouds are named after bird formations, as we learn in Aide-mémoire du Voyageur by D. Kaltbrunner, 1881.  [For Gary Barwin.]
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The first illustration below is from Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.  The second is from Departmental Ditties by Rudyard Kipling, 1898, and its caption reads, "Pagett was dear to mosquitos, sandflies found him a treat." 
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 26, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"We must wish," from A Missing Witness by Frank Barrett, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It's Really Happening (permalink)
"I tell him to raise the music, and it's 'Hang on Sloopy,' my favorite song of all time, and I remember thinking, Oh my God, it's really happening." —Urban Meyer, qtd. in Buckeye Rebirth by Bill Rabinowitz

The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Cross, cadaverous, odd, and ill-natured," from The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Man in the Moon, Volume V.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"He melts, I think.  He goes like a drop of froth.  You look at him, and there he is.  You look at him again, and—there he isn't."  From The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
You've heard of sticking inhuman pins into a voodoo doll, but the old-school sticks human pins into a pseudo doll.  From The Baby's Museum by Uncle Charlie, 1882.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 25, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Leslie's Fate; and Hilda, or the Ghost of Erminstein by Andrew Charles Parker Haggard, 1892.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Thackerayana, 1875.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Arrested Development's Tobias wondering what his daughter is thinking.  The subtitle reads, "She lives her life, and I get the pleasure of guessing what that might entail."  The precursor appears in The Lady's Manor by Emma Marshall, 1896.  Its caption reads, "What is my little girl thinking about?"
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"Looking under sofas and easy-chairs in the company of a popular actress and a French maid," from Bushigrams by Guy Newell Boothby, 1897.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
From The New Hyperion by Edward Strahan, 1875.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from Daylight Land by William Henry Harrison Murray (1888).  The caption reads: "We were too astonished at what we saw to say a word.  We stood an gazed in silent amazement."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 24, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)

From Récits d'un Touriste Auvergnat by Jean Baptiste Maurice Bielawski, 1887.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

The Paper St. Journal reviews our imaginary Kafka parables, Franzlations.  "Sometimes maudlin, but always wise, Conley, Barwin, and Thomas induce you into a willing hypnosis as you ponder over the pithy blocked letters, scattered scraps of sentences, and gothic illustrations."  The reviewer, James Puntillo, credits us with constructing within the book "a firewall to protect against readers who won't delight so easily" in aphorisms*, and if it's indeed true that we did that then we'll figure out how to reverse-engineer our previous works, too.  Whew—it'll be a relief!

*This is what Jonathan Caws-Elwitt might call a Retroactive Lifetime Goal.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Staring Into the Depths (permalink)
Prof. Oddfellow narrowly averts self-hypnosis.  Hypno-Glasses by Accoutrements.
Marja writes: "Love the idea that you think you didn't hypnotize yourself."
> read more from Staring Into the Depths . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The child of the symbol," from Sebastiani's Secret by S. E. Waller, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It Bears Repeating (permalink)
"Be especially wary when working or recreating around water, which seems obvious but bears repeating."
> read more from It Bears Repeating . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Dans un pas-seul il exprime son extréme desespoir," from The Oxford Thackeray.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 23, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's some Droste effect from Mr. Sponge's Sporting Tour by Robert Smith Surtees, 1892.  We're reminded of a scene with Matt Berry in The IT Crowd (below).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Sappho from Comic History of Greece by Charles M. Snyder, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Discussing turnips," from Roughing It by Mark Twain.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"A witch taking Scotchmen to London," from Our Country by Benson John Lossing, 1875.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from When Life is Young by Mary Elizabeth Dodge (1894).
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them?

• 7-letter words: 14
• 8-letter words: 1

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 22, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Doleful begins to feel uneasy."  And Uneasy perhaps exclaims to Doleful, "Get your hand off me!"  From Handley Cross by Robert Smith Surtees, 1892.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I seed a passing of a many shadders," from Tales from the Veld by Ernest Glanville and illustrated by M. Nisbet, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

"You eat like a Saint of Good Nourishment and they think you're responding to the medication."
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Staring at the Sun (permalink)
Three suns from Bilder aus der Deutschen Kulturgeschichte by Albert Richter, 1882.
> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 21, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Comedian Stewart Lee would have us believe that Scotland hasn't changed much from this depiction in A Book of Scotish Pasquils, edited by James Maidment, 1868.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Call it a Hunch (permalink)
Call it a hunch, an intuition, a sneaky suspicion, or just plain being nosy.

A still from the classic Young Frankenstein.
> read more from Call it a Hunch . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
"Sarah Terwilligar's attempt to fly to heaven [as] the world [is] to come to an end," from Upper Canada Sketches by Thomas Conant, 1898.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Unicorns (permalink)
This unicorn in a silent forest appears in Das Deutsche Volkstum by Hans Heinrich Joseph Meyer, 1899.  This should be of interest: A Field Guide to Identifying Unicorns by Sound.
> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
An illustration by Lawrence Chaves (1932) for de Quincey's Opium Eater.

   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 20, 2015

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Sluggo's levitating hat, from The Up-to-Date Primer by John Wilson Bengough, 1896.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Nonsense Dept. (permalink)
"What nonsense, darling!" — a precursor to the unpublished comic novel Talk Nonsense To Me by Jonathan Caws-Elwitt.  From Thrilling Life Stories for the Masses, 1892.
> read more from Nonsense Dept. . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Gradually, however, they assumed a darker and more mysterious character."  From The Bride of Lammermoor by Walter Scott and illustrated by Fred Pegram, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Book of Whispers (permalink)
"The voices in the waves are always whispering to Florence," from the Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.  No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The chair was an ugly old gentleman; and what was more, he was winking at Tom Smart."  From The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but some people do it for attention."
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 19, 2015

Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
From Travels on Horseback in Mantchu Tartary by George Fleming, 1863.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Here's more proof that everyone's an art critic: "This is a terrible piece of work," from The Lost Gold of the Montezumas by William Osborne Stoddard, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Arise!  Arise!"  From The Decameron of a Hypnotist by Ernest Richard Suffling, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"But in the night he ran away," from Red Apple and Silver Bells by Hamish Hendry and illustrated by Alice B. Woodward, 1899.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I will bury myself in my books, and the devil may pipe to his own."  From Maud by Alfred Tennyson, 1878.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
"I dreamed a night or two ago."  (The awkward cropping at the top of the image is courtesy of the British Library.)  From Vagrant Verses by George Staunton Brodie and illustrated by Wallis Mackay, 1876.
If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 18, 2015

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Mount Rushmore, from Walt Mason: His Book, 1916.  The caption reads, "Like some lone mountain in the starry night."
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Thackerayana, 1875.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Life in Brazil by Thomas Ewbank, 1856.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Puzzles and Games (permalink)
An unknown game, from The History of Herodotus: A New English Version edited by George Rawlinson, 1862.

Jonathan Caws-Elwitt quips, "Looks like 'scissors cuts paper' to me!  I see that the judge's ruling on that play was overturned."
> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
If this is a depiction of the Mississippi River, then our best guess is Memphis.  From How the World Was Peopled by Edward Fontaine, 1872.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Once a proofreader, always a proofreader (apparently).  From Mark Twain's Roughing It.  The caption reads, "Needed marking."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 17, 2015

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Flat Stanley, from Blasts from The Ram's Horn, 1902.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Everyone called a different question to the parrot, from The Bookshelf for Boys and Girls: Little Journeys into Bookland, 1912.  [For Gary Barwin.]
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Your Ship Will Come In (permalink)
From Tales of Our Coast, illustrated by Frank Brangwyn, 1896.
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The phantom fight," from France by Leitch Ritchie, 1872.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Les Merveilles du Mont. St. Michel by Paul Henri Coretin Féval, 1880.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Going out with the key," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 16, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
This is the best "mustard walking in the snow" picture we've seen all year.  From American Cookery, 1914.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"He stood quite still and looked at me," from Ghostly Tales by Wilhelmina Fitzclarence, Countess of Munster, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It's Really Happening (permalink)
"It's really happening, just as the cards predicted."
—Laurie Faria Stolarz, Blue is for Nightmares

The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Hepsworth Millions by Christian Lys, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"To his extreme horror finds every watch, every clock, and every chronometer pointing out a different hour; so that all the information he can get is, that the time is something between 12 o'clock to-day and 12 o-clock to-morrow."  From The Man in the Moon, Volume V.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The Lord of the World from Thirty-eight Years in India: From Juganath to the Himalaya Mountains by William Tayler, 1881.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 15, 2015

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Escheresque architecture, from Geschichte Oesterreichs by Alexander Patuzzi, 1862 (thirty-six years before Escher was born).
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to Chloe Meakin's poem "How I Came to Hate Bungalows," from Other Countries by William Morrison Bell, 1872.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Vision" (1879) by Odilon Redon.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Jest like as the dewdrops sparkle / In the sun of the mornin' skies."  From Grandma's Attic Treasures by Mary Dow Brine, 1882.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Story of Prince Hildebrand and the Princess Ida by Thomas Strong Seccombe, 1880.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids (permalink)
This puzzle grid contains several big words. Can you find them? One of the 7-letter words sounds like the C-word.

• 7-letter words: 13
• 8-letter words: 3

All letters in the word must touch (in any direction), and no square may be reused.

Click to display solutions
> read more from Puzzles and Games :: Letter Grids . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 14, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The fire instantly blazed up," from The Adventures of a Stowaway by Frederick J. Whishaw, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I ran on and on, calling and screaming until I burst a blood-vessel," from Paving the Way: A Romance of the Bush by Simpson Newland, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Man in the Moon, Volume IV.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Staring at the Sun (permalink)
"Worshippers of the rising sun," from from The Foreign Freaks of Five Friends by C. A. Jones, 1882.
> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Sham devils from Across Africa by Verney Lovett Cameron, 1877.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 13, 2015

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The internet is a haven for misattributed quotations, but all quotations attributed to Buddha are, due to a technicality, accurate.

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Idylls of the King by Alfred Tennyson, 1898.  A larger version of the image is here or here.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Ginx's Baby by Edward Jenkins, 1871.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
We know you've speculated, so here's what might be.  From A Tramp Abroad by Mark Twain.

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Unicorns (permalink)
From The Middle Kingdom by Samuel Wells Williams, 1883.  This should be of interest: A Field Guide to Identifying Unicorns by Sound.

> read more from Unicorns . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 12, 2015

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Prof. Oddfellow received a mysterious bottle in the mail, with a note explaining that the cord is tied to whatever is inside and that the bottle must never, ever be shaken or opened.  It's been said that the spirits that move the world are not the kind that come out of a bottle.  We'll see about that.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"For when it said 'Keep still!' I kept still."  From The Beetle: A Mystery by Richard Marsh, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"The storm," from The Story of an Ocean Tramp by Charles Clark, 1898
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It's Really Happening (permalink)
"I am so happy, I can't believe it's really happening!" 
"I can't believe it either honey!  I feel like I am dreaming."

The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Here Mr. Lorry became aware, from where he sat, of a most remarkable goblin shadow on the wall."  From The Works of Charles Dickens, Household Edition.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Right Word (permalink)
A thicket is a definite article.  From Fair Diana by Wanderer, 1884.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 11, 2015

Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to TED Talks.  The caption reads, "The living hand on the screen, shown during the course of a lecture delivered by Henry Morton at the Academy of Music, New York, February 3, 1871."  From Morton Memorial by Franklin De Ronde Furman, 1905.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
"And make the puppy dance a jig, / When he began to quote Augustine."  From Every-day Characters by Winthrop Mackworth Praed and illustrated by Cecil Charles Windsor, 1896.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Shadows and Other Poems by E. Samuels and illustrated by W. Fitzgerald, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"In the cabaret of death," from Bohemian Paris of To-day by W. C. Morrow, 1899.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Not calculated to tranquilize," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Brazil and the Brazilians by Daniel Parish Kidder, 1879.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 10, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Where the Morse Code is Buried, from St. Nicholas magazine.  In lieu of flowers . . .
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"It's a fine head, whatever."  From The Adventures of Prince Prigio and of His Son, Prince Ricardo by Andrew Lang, 1900.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
From Travels on Horseback in Mantchu Tartary by George Fleming, 1863.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the "great dorg" of a film Mannequin (1987), from The Tinted Venus by J. Bernard Partridge, 1898.  The caption reads, "'It is a miserable thing,' he was thinking, 'for a man to have a female statue trotting after him like a great dorg.'"
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"Waiting," from Australian Sketches Made on Tour by Harry Furniss, 1899.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Where go the good Days when they end?  Why do they never stay?  I often wish that God would send a nice bright Yesterday!"  From Red Apple and Silver Bells by Hamish Hendry and illustrated by Alice B. Woodward, 1899.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 9, 2015

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
What's weird about this signature of Treasury Secretary Jack Lew?  Too many letters!  (See more about this signature over at Futility Closet.)

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Fifty years before Phil Spector invented the "Wall of Sound," there was the sphere of sound, as we see in this illustration from the magazine Crisis, 1910.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"Things were gettin' awfuller and awfuller every instant," from A Story-Teller's Pack by Frank Richard Stockton, 1897.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
From The Jackdaw of Rheims by Thomas Ingoldsby, 1870.
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
"The dream-girl," from France by Leitch Ritchie, 1872.

If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Gower shooting at the world, from Cassell's Library of English Literature, 1875.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 8, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Enoch Arden by Alfred Tennyson and illustrated by Arthur Hughes, 1866.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"Smoothed his hat & talked about the weather."  From The Works of George John Whyte-Melville, 1898.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Right Word (permalink)
"Colon and Semi-colon," from Buffalo Land by W. E. Webb, 1873.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea (permalink)
"But through Duntullum's pile like witch's tooth / The ceaseless seawinds whistle without ruth."  From Dunvegan Castle by Harold Steward Rathbone, 1900.
   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(   ,(
`-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `-' `
"The sea is a cruel mistress. Yet again the sea has behaved unconscionably. It's time to address this terrible problem that is the sea." —Captain Neddie, from the hilarious BBC series Broken News
> read more from This Terrible Problem That Is the Sea . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


No News Is Good News (permalink)
"Nothing unusual," from Across Country by Wanderer and illustrated by Georgina Bowers, 1882.
> read more from No News Is Good News . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 7, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Jemmy Dodds peered into the body of the vehicle, and—."  From The Devil's Shilling by Campbell Rae Brown, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to David Copperfield's illusion of walking through the Great Wall of China, from Shrewsbury by Stanley John Weyman, 1898.  The caption reads, "In an instant I was on the other side of the fence."
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
Dreaming in (Venn) circles, from My Little Girl by Walter Besant, 1873.

If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
From Dore's illustrations to the Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The caption reads, "I suddenly arose in my ghostly attire and in a moment was upon him."  From "The Ghost in the Cemetery" in Allan Pinkerton's Criminal Reminiscences and Detective Sketches, 1878.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Haunted Major by Robert Marshall (1902).  The caption reads: "Hopped about in a grotesque and undignified ecstasy."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 6, 2015

Precursors (permalink)
♪ ♫  Tale as old as time
True as it can be
Barely even friends
Then somebody bends
Unexpectedly  ♪ ♫  

From Eric Brighteyes by Henry Rider Haggard, 1893.
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Right Word (permalink)
Thanks to Mike Kloran (author of Zombies: The Stinking Dead) for his review of our dictionary of One-Letter Words: "It’s a fun little piece that looks at all the many ways a single letter may be used as a unit of thought, or as we usually call them, words. And we’re not just talking about the article 'a' or the pronoun 'I.' No no. We’re talking about how all the letters of the alphabet have been used as words throughout literature. ... A really fun way to look at the language in a fresh light, even for tired teachers like you and me."
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"The mist has gone by, dear love!  The mist has quite gone by!"  From The Grey Man by Samuel Rutherford Crockett and illustrated by John Seymour Lucas, 1896.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Calton Ballads by Catter Thun, 1898.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Fine Line Between... (permalink)
"There can be a fine line between creative and nonsensical language."
A printed collection of A Fine Line Between... is now available from Amazon.com.
> read more from A Fine Line Between... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Everybody's Doing This Now (permalink)
"They jumped in all at once," from Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.
> read more from Everybody's Doing This Now . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
What if Bewitched's Endora had turned Darrin into a religious mendicant?  See caption (from Tent Work in Palestine by Claude Reignier Conder and illustrated by Josiah Wood Whymper, 1878).

> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 5, 2015

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

A detail from a window display photograhed by Hartwell.
The Guardian dubbed Dean Martin "St. Dean of the Whatever."
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
"Adela is fast asleep, her mouth half open, her face relaxed and absent; but her closed lids are transparent, and on their thin parchment the night is writing its pact with the devil, half text, half picture, full of erasures, corrections, and scribbles." —Bruno Schulz, Sanatorium Under the Sign of the Hourglass

If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"When Molly had let in a ray of light," from A Smile within a Tear by Helen Guendolen Ramsden, 1897.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


It's Really Happening (permalink)
"It's happening.  Yes.  It absolutely is."

The foreground of this collage is from the extraordinarily brilliant comedy series Arrested Development.
> read more from It's Really Happening . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"When taken to be shaken," from Poets' Wit and Humour by William Henry Wills, 1882.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Don't Take This the Wrong Way (permalink)
"Don't take this the wrong way, but I can tell you're not done with this. You still have things to discover, even though you don't know it yet."
> read more from Don't Take This the Wrong Way . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 4, 2015

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Into the mouthpiece of the machine I spoke, asking, 'Do you hear me?'"  From The Story Hunter or Tales of the Weird and Wild by Ernest Richard Suffling, 1896.  [For Gordon Meyer.]
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


A Rose is a ... (permalink)
York RoseA rose may be a rose may be a rose; but not this one.
> read more from A Rose is a ... . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Some of the marvels which Sir John Mandeville saw," from Half-Hours with the Early Explorers by Thomas Frost, 1873.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


The Right Word (permalink)
From Lays of Modern Oxford by Anon., 1874.
> read more from The Right Word . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Satan dressed as a lady of the eleventh century, from The National and Domestic History of England by William Hickman Smith Aubrey, 1878.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 3, 2015

Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
From The History of Springfield in Massachusetts by Charles Henry Barrows, 1921.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Devil's Case by Robert Williams Buchanan, 1896.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
Here's a precursor to the winged monkeys in The Wizard of Oz, from an ad in the back of the novel A Woman with a History by Weedon Grossmith (1896).
> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Two Sides / Same Coin (permalink)
"Silence! he roared out."  From The Newcomes by William Makepeace Thackeray and illustrated by Chris Hammond, 1898.
> read more from Two Sides / Same Coin . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
A flourish of trumpets from The Man in the Moon, Volume V.
> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 2, 2015

Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


This May Surprise You (permalink)
"Old comics would be even more cluttered with tin cans if comic-strip goats didn’t keep their numbers down." —Christoher Miller, American Cornball

> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"Consulting the god through a male medium," from Social Life of the Chinese by Justus Doolittle, 1867.  This should be of interest: Seance Parlor Feng Shui.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Precursors (permalink)
This precursor to Mary Poppins appears in Fra Det Moderne Frankrig by Richard Kaufmann, 1882.

> read more from Precursors . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"I say, Rawhead," quoth one of the Ghosts, in a hollow, sepulchral tone, "you're cheating!"
"I say, Bloodybones," quoth the other, "you're drunk!"
The Man in the Moon, Volume IV
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
An illustration from The Sociable Ghost by Olive Harper (1903).  The caption reads: "I won't play if such favoritism is shown."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest

January 1, 2015

Strange Dreams (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

"Sleep is a slow motion practical joke." —Gary Barwin

If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The cow went on before them," from The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe and illustrated by Walter Paget, 1896.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
The caption might be the opposite of, "Is it hot in here, or is it just me?"  It reads, "Would you like your overcoat, Colin?"  From A Double Mistake by Edith E. Smyth, 1898.
*Inspired by the world's only accurate meteorological report, "Yesterday's Weather," as seen on Check It Out.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Prickly Pear Blossoms by William Hamilton Nation, 1900.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
"The egg dance," from Round the World with General Grant by John Russell Young, 1879.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Strange Dreams (permalink)
The night-mare visiting after supper.  From Dicks' English Library of Standard Works, 1884.

If you have a strange dream to share, send it along!
> read more from Strange Dreams . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest


Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
Two shadows in conversation, from Cassell's Old and New Edinburgh by James Grant, 1880.

[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Google+ Pinterest



Page 0 of 967



Original Content Copyright © 2017 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.