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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
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Today — February 19, 2020

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
Those fun moments when pretzel knots impersonate Aztec glyphs.  Pretzel knot diagrams from "Hyperbolic Pretzel Knots" by Jeffrey Meier.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
If we've said it once, we've said it a thousand times -- "Grab bags are dangerous."  From Unknown magazine, 1942.
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I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"Snicker if you like but [cryptozoologists] don't care."  They write stuff like How to Spot the Loch Ness Monster Every Time and A Field Guide to Identifying Unicorns by Sound.
From UFO Newsclipping Service, 1989.
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Yesterday's Weather (permalink)
"When I dance amid the striking lightning, he dances with me too."  He'll dance with anybody, but please don't prove that for yourself by going on during an electrical storm.  From Weird Tales, 1939, illustrated by Virgil Finlay.
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This May Surprise You (permalink)
Evicted by the divine landlord.  From The Varsity, March 31, 1976.
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Temporal Anomalies (permalink)
It is simultaneously 4:00 and 8:00 in this temporal anomaly from Serbia, documented by Bicanski.  We might note a bit of irony: although time at that clock tower is unstable, the numbers four and eight happen to be symbolic of stability, symmetry, and squareness in Chinese culture.  Though we weren't on location to discover the exact cause of this timely weirdness, we offer this photo to help hone the insights of would-be investigators of temporal anomalies.  The more clocks one sees that are "on the fritz" (Fritz being the German clockmaker who first went "cuckoo"), the better attuned one will be to time warps in the wild.
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Yearbook Weirdness (permalink)
From Medical College of Virginia's 1934 yearbook.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From The Lost Princess of Oz by L. Frank Baum, 1917.
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Yearbook Weirdness (permalink)
He's praying that an effigy named Cato will burn forever.  From Susquehanna's 1901 yearbook.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Le Journal Amusant, 1904.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Nebelspalter, 1895.
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Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
INSTRUCTIONS: An isolated pedestrian is on one page; click for the context on another.  From Eastern Kentucky's 1968 yearbook.

From Eastern Kentucky's 1968 yearbook
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Yearbook Weirdness (permalink)
We would have blogged this for Septober 31, but the computer doesn't recognize that as a valid date.  If it's not real, why does every Septober 31 play out like this cartoon?
From Tulane's 1921 yearbook. 
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Images Moving Through Time (permalink)
We spotted this satiated alligator at our local concrete statue shop.
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Yearbook Weirdness (permalink)
From Salem's 1907 yearbook.  See How to Hoodoo Hack a Yearbook.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
The old woman throws the milk at the fox.  From A Book of Fairy-Tale Foxes by Clifton Johnson and illustrated by Frank A. Nankivell, 1914.
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Yearbook Weirdness (permalink)
From North Texas State's 1920 yearbook.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Ric et Rac, 1931.
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Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Recueil d'Antiquités by Antoine Mongez, 1804.
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Is Today The Day? (permalink)
19
February 2020

“Today is the day to set up a plan for modifying your behavior.”

—Carlos Perex, Getting Off the Merry-Go-Round of Compulsive Behaviors, 2003

From the outrageous to the inspirational to the hilarious, here’s a daily reminder to break out of the old grind and do something unexpected, for the fun, the challenge, or the heck of it.

If today simply isn’t your day, click here to have a different day.


Music Box Moment (permalink)
Do you deserve a nostalgic breather?  Through the delicate workings of the music box, even the most dramatic compositions seem to play only for you.  You’ll hear even a very familiar piece in a whole new way.  Courtesy of home recording pioneer Ken Clinger, here’s today’s music box selection.  It will sound surprisingly good even through built-in computer speakers, and it will cut through the ambient noise of the office without being distracting.

Featured in Today’s Music Box:
Dorian Moment (Clinger)
performed by Ken Clinger
If you could use another Music Box Moment, choose a piece:


There’s a Signpost Up Ahead (permalink)
One's life path is marked by crossroads and signposts.  If you are confronted with making a choice today, perhaps the signpost displayed here will help to characterize your situation and guide you to make a decision.  If you need more guidance, refresh this page for another symbol.  If both signs are the same, perhaps any choice will lead to the same outcome.

The signs are inspired by a system of symbols entitled "Spiritual Diagnosis," developed by Dr. Robert McNary of Montana.  Dr. McNary actually creates nine-faceted mandala charts for people and interprets the symbols with uncanny accuracy.  Dr. McNary's web site is RockyMountainAstrologer.com.
> view a larger version of your signpost . . .
Yesterday — February 18, 2020

Restoring the Lost Sense (permalink)
From Frightful Plays by Charles Brooks, 1922.
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Copyright © 2020 Craig Conley