CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, a “monk for the modern age” by George Parker, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.

Found 22 posts tagged ‘florida’


August 15, 2019 (permalink)

"Florida not alone."  From Florida Flambeau, 1959.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
#florida #vintage headline
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August 13, 2019 (permalink)

Florida is colder than Alaska.  From Florida Flambeau, 1959.
See also a book called Winter is the Warmest Season.
> read more from Yesterday's Weather . . .
#alaska #florida #vintage headline #cold weather
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June 1, 2019 (permalink)

Unbelievably, it's always June in Florida.  From The Judge, 1922.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
#vintage illustration #art #florida #travel poster #june
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January 30, 2019 (permalink)

The amorphous blob of politics is here very accurately depicted on the chalkboard.  While Florida is shown flatteringly thick and long, the peninsula in truth suffers shrinkage from all the surrounding water.  From Eastern Kentucky's 1975 yearbook.

*For some unbelievably weird yearbook imagery, see our How to Hoodoo Hack a Yearbook.

> read more from Yearbook Weirdness . . .
#vintage yearbook #politics #teacher #florida #political science
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February 4, 2018 (permalink)

All those bugs in Florida -- they're tourists, too.  From The Judge, 1913.
> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
#vintage illustration #anthropomorphism #art #insects #florida #bugs
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February 1, 2017 (permalink)

Here's the obsolescence of the sunset over Sarasota Bay.
> read more from Staring at the Sun . . .
#sunset #vintage postcard #florida #sarasota #obsolete #red sky
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January 28, 2017 (permalink)

Many are skeptical of "spirit photography," but here is what we know: (1) I took a photo of something "then," (2) linear time is an illusion, (3) you're seeing me take that photo "now," (4) there is a oneness.  Thank you for smiling.
> read more from Images Moving Through Time . . .
#sunrise #st. augustine #spirit photography #florida #photographer #ocean sunrise #atlantic ocean
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November 17, 2016 (permalink)

On this day in 1953, Clematis Street in West Palm Beach, Florida became obsolete.
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
#vintage postcard #florida #obsolescence #west palm beach
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October 8, 2016 (permalink)

"Cigar girl, Ybor City, Tampa, Florida."
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
#vintage illustration #art #cigar #vintage postcard #florida #ybor city #tampa
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June 28, 2016 (permalink)

INSTRUCTIONS: Click to deepen the sunset.

Lake Morton, Lakeland, Florida
> read more from Postcard Transformations . . .
#palm trees #sunset #vintage postcard #florida #lakeland #lake morton #gif
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May 25, 2016 (permalink)

INSTRUCTIONS: Click to bring on the night.

Collins Ave. looking south from 17th St., Miami Beach, Florida
> read more from Postcard Transformations . . .
#vintage postcard #florida #miami beach #night and day #gif #darkness and light
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April 13, 2016 (permalink)

The moonlight over Jacksonville, Florida is obsolete in this scan from the Boston Public Library.  (By the way, the phrase "obsolete moonlight" delivers no accurate Google results.)
[Inexplicable images from generations ago invite us to restore the lost sense of immediacy.  We follow the founder of the Theater of Spontaneity, Jacob Moreno, who proposed stringing together "now and then flashes" to unfetter illusion and let imagination run free.  The images we have collected for this series came at a tremendous price, which we explained previously.]
> read more from Restoring the Lost Sense . . .
#full moon #moonlight #vintage postcard #jacksonville #st. john's river #florida #obsolescence
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March 30, 2015 (permalink)


As we see in this vintage map, Florida once occupied most of North America.  But one could also make an argument that most of North America was once Scotland, just as absurdist playwright N. F. Simpson has argued that the Mediterranean could technically fall under Scottish law:

Lawyer:  It would be enough to show that it [the Mediterranean] is in what — for the present purposes — can be deemed to be Scotland, and here we might usefully explore the possibility that Scotland, as we know it, may not always have occupied the precise position north of the border that it is commonly thought of as occupying today.  We are assisted here by the known fact that the general configuration of the Earth's surface, such as it is, was not arrived at overnight.  It is the end product of a not unlengthy process involving widespread upheaval over a period of several millennia, during the course of which things were in a considerable state of flux ... and it should not be difficult to demonstrate as an a priori possibility that Scotland — or what was subsequently to become known as Scotland — might, in one of the remoter periods of geological time, have occupied, however fleetingly, and prior to making its journey northwards to the position on the map that it has occupied ever since, [the Mediterranean].  If so, there would be a strong prima facie case for a reappraisal of the whole situation with a view to bringing the whole matter fairly and squarely within the jurisdiction of the Scottish courts....
Senior:  Sounds promising.
Minister:  Yes — I think one could give voice to a tentative eureka there.
[From Was He Anyone?, first performed in 1972]

> read more from This May Surprise You . . .
#vintage illustration #art #vintage map #n. f. simpson #florida
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December 19, 2014 (permalink)

Here's a precursor to the tacky tourist postcard culture of Florida, from Camping and Cruising in Florida by James Alexander Henshall, 1884.
> read more from Precursors . . .
#vintage illustration #alligator #art #florida #open for business
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April 1, 2013 (permalink)

We always imagine that there's got to be somewhere else
better than where we are right now; this is the Great
Somewhere Else we all carry around in our heads. We
believe Somewhere Else is out there for us if only we
could find it.
Brad Warner, Hardcore Zen

Here in America's oldest city, a common answer to the standard "How's it going?" or "What's new?" is a non-ironic "Livin' the life!"  I love that "Riley" is understood, that we're all-encompassing Irishmen.  (Don't all the best umbrella terms emigrate from rainy climes?)  Granted, Saint Augustine is a quaint seaside village with picturesque harbors and Old European architecture, and its long history makes it unique in the nation; even the circling beam of its lighthouse seems to demarcate a Venn diagram with no overlaps.  But the age-old question in My Dinner With Andre begs itself: is a Himalayan mountaintop (as it were) a better spot for finding one's bliss than one's Lower East Side apartment?  Saint Augustine is one spot among oh-so many on a spinning sphere, so why do migratory Rileys come down to avoid riling up?  It would seem that by collective though technically unspoken agreement, New Yorkers (mostly) have decided that this is the place to escape, thereby creating an Otherworld, a B in contradistinction to A.  Sure, everybody leads a life, in the sense of "hypothetical."  But to live the life is to direct one's own script and also be one's own location scout.  Sure, it's chic to delegate, but Rileys know better.

Pictured: In the foreground, Prof. Oddfellow (Riley is understood) checks the GoPro camera while Michael focuses on a sundial at the center of historic Saint Augustine.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .
#st. augustine #florida #Saint Augustine #emigration #life of Riley #My Dinner with Andrew
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October 1, 2010 (permalink)



“By launching a number of vessels, you make it more likely that your ship will come in.” —Phil Fournier

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .
#boat #vintage postcard #florida #tarpon springs
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September 17, 2010 (permalink)



“Keep a tight lid on the boat, and your ship will come in.” —James Van Pelt

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .
#boats #vintage postcard #florida #tarpon springs
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September 10, 2010 (permalink)



“Your ship will come back to you laden with all the precious, divine gifts.” —Annalee Skarin

 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .
#boats #vintage postcard #florida #sponges #tarpon springs
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August 27, 2010 (permalink)

“The bottom of your boat must be protected by paint.” —Morton J. Schultz


 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .
#vintage postcard #florida #glass-bottom boat #silver springs
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August 13, 2010 (permalink)

“Your boat must be able to move in very light airs.” —Lin Pardey


 
* Our printed collection of vintage nautical postcards is entitled Your Ship Will Come In and is available from Amazon.com.
> read more from Your Ship Will Come In . . .
#vintage postcard #florida #silver springs
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Original Content Copyright © 2019 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.